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May 11, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

IE WEATHER
R; SLOWLY RISING
TEMPERATURE

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AnD NIGHT WE
t BBVICE

I

VOL. XXIX. No. 156.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 11, 1919.

PRICE THREE

r ,

RHNTZAN PHESENTS
T REATY DEMANDS

DECLARES REQUIREMENTS CAN-
NOT BE MET BY ANY
PEOPLE
"WEEK OF MOURNING"
DECREED FOR BERLIN
Goternment Bans Frivolity to Give
Expression to Sorrow Caused
By Peace Terms
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, May 10.-Count Von Brock-
dorf-Rantzau, a despatch from Ver-
sailes says, has presented to Premier
Clemenceau, chairman of 4he peace
conference, a note declaring that the
draft of the peace treaty contains de-
mands which could be borne by no
people. Many of the demands, more-
over, in the view o the German ex-
perts, are incapable of accomplish-
ineit.
The German program for a League
of Nations has also been presented to
Premier Clemenceau. Despatches from
Versailles say that the German dele-
gation complained that Germany was
asked to sign the Allied plan for a
league although not among the states
invited to enter it.
"Week of Mourning"
'A week of mourning" has been de-
creed by the government to give ex-
pression to the "sorrow and depres-
sionu" called forth by the announce-
ment of the peace terms. The week
wilt begin Sunday.
Frivolity Banned
The decree provides that public fri-
volity must be stopped for a period
of eight days. Its provisions affect the
first class theaters in the same man-
ner as the popular cabarets. Dancing,
horse-racing, and gambling will be
suppressed for the week, and the oc-
casion will be used to put a definite
end to the gambling trenzy which is
holding greater Berlin in its tenta-
cles. A season of soul searching would
seem .to be. the most probable reac-
tionto the frivolity and gambling
which has been in progress.
Paris, May 10.-The Allies can ad-
mit" of no discussion of their right to
(Continued on Page Six)
FRENCHAPROVE LEAGUE
OF NATION- RO ILLAIN
WILSON DID NOT CONSIDER SIT-
UATION, SAYS RETURNED
LIEUTENANT
"Contrary to the general 'belief, the
French people were heartily in favor
of the League of Nations project,"
said Lieut. Eugene Rovillain in talk-
ing to some of his former pupils Fri-
day afternoon.
"In the opinon of France, Wilson
made his big mistake in laying down
his 14 points without considering that
the whole European situation might
be changed when victory was finally
won-0
Explain 14 Points
Lieutenant Rovillain said that Wil-
son when he proposed his league plan,
declared that every nation should
make concessions; and that the United
States would suspend the Monroe
Doctrine and recognize the equality of
nations. Republican opposition in
this country forced him to tell Cle-
menceau that the United States could
mwt make their concessions. This gave
the "old fox" the opening that he
'wanted for the insurance of France's
safety in the future. But it also caus-
ed all sorts of other trouble for Japan
and Italy both declared their right to
annexations. Lieutenant Rovillain ex-
pressed the opinion that there was no
doubt but that Italy would get Fiume
in the end.
Lands Yank Soldiers
In speaking of the fighting ability
of American soldiers, Lieutenant Ro-
villain said that they did remarkably
well, considering their lack of tain-

lug and experience. They never were
minus courage and their main fault
was confidence, to the point where
they would not listen to the advice
of their more cautious French teach-
ers. The officers were so untrained
for fighting that in attacking a ma-
chine gun nest, for instance, they
would lose 1,000 men taking the posi-
tion where the French would lose but
100.f
"But the Americans always took
such positions," said Lieutenant Ro-
villain. "Often they would throw
away their guns and go after the
Boches with their sleeves rolled up."
He said that only about 250,000 Amer-
ican soldiers of the 2,000,000 in France
participated in the actual fighting.

"V"' LIBERTY LOAN
OVERSUBSCRIBED
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 10.-The fifth
and last popular war loan of the
United 'States has been oversub-
scribed.
Although the approximate total will
not be known for nearly two weeks
figures available tonight showed that
the American people had responded
generously to the appeal to "finish the
job."
Like all of its predecessors the Vic-
tory Liberty Loan on the last day of
the campaign suddenly jumped above
the mark set as its limit. The day
brought an avalanche of subscriptions
which banks could not attempt to
count until next week.
None of today's -harvest was includ-
ed in the total of $$3,849,638,000 of-
ficially tabulated tonight by the treas-
ury, and officials would not be sur-
prised to see the final figures grow
to nearly $6,000,000,000. Only $4,500,-
000,000 will be accepted.
A6NN UAL BOUNE
Six Acts Besides Musical Numbers Will
Form Entertainment at Hill
Auditorium
MAY 27 ANNOUNCED AS DATE;
PROCEEDS FOR NEW UNIFORMS
Participating in the entertainment
to be given under the auspices of the
Varsity band, Tuesday, May 27, will
be comedians, impersonators, and man-
agers wh, were ,prominent in past
Bounces or other entertainments pro-
duced by the students.
The six acts or more which togeth-
er with popular and college music by
the band, will form the program for
the evening which will be given by men
who have won applause for previous
performances in Hill auditorium. A
vaudeville skit, acted by leading com-
edian talent, and musical numbers,
given by talented musicians, are billed
for the entertainment.
Experienced Men in Charge
The production side is composed al-
most entirely of men, trained by form-
er band bouices. E. G. Edwards, '20,
manager of the band received exper-
ience in band work and H. S. Simpson,
'21E, assistant manager of the band
worked on last year's bounce. B. R.
D'Ooge handled the publicity and sales
policies of the bounces before, as he
will again this year.
John Kasberger, ex-'18, and Charles
Boos, ex-'18, director and assistant
director rpspectively, managed other
performances of a like nature and Kas-
berger has participated in several Un-
ion operas. Frederick Storrer, stage
manager, was employed in a like cap-
acity with the Spotlight vaudeville and
the Union opera this year.
Best Talent Secured
In, every respect the management is
endeavoring to make this entertain-
ment equal band bounces in past
years. The best available talent has
been secured for the occasion, and re-
hearsals will start soon.
The profit goes to pay the expenses
of the band during the past year and
will probably enable the members of
the organization to secure new uni-
forms. During the past year the Var-
sity 'hand has played at Chicago, Sgag-
inaw, and Detroit, at all of which plac-
es, it has won praise by its playing.
WILSON TO DIRECT
'14 POINT' REPLIES
(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 10.- President Wilson
will personally direct such answers

which may be decided on concerning
German inquiries into a peace treaty
differing from the President's 14
points.
This was announced in higher quart-
ers today, according to the instruction
which Chancellor Scheidemann has
given the German plenipotentaries at
Versailles to address a note to the
Allies comparing the terms of the
treaty with the 14 points and making
a counter-proposal for verbal negotia-
tions.I
Thus far, however, no such note or
counter-proposal has been received
and it is the present opinion that
nothing is likely to take such form for
a week, as the Germans probably will
wish to study the treaty before taking
action.
1,600 ARRESTED IN HAMBURG
FOR RIOTING AND PLUNDERING
Berlin. May 10. --More than 1,600
persons are under arrest in Hamburg
charged with rioting, plunder, and
disturbing the peace in connection
with recent disorders there.

BUCKEYE CONTEST,
LCALED BCAUSE
SOF WETGROUNDIS
OFFICIALS' ATTEMPT TO LOCATE
FIELD IN CONDITION, PROVES
FUTILE
THIRD GAME OF FOUR
DAY TRIP, CANCELLED
Wolverines Visit Notre Dame, Purdue
and 0. S. U. Without Being Able
to Play Single Game
Although more than 2,500 tickets
had been sold for the Michigan Ohio
State contest to be played at Colum-
bus yesterday afternoon, the game
was called because of wet grounds.
After a fruitless attempt upon the
part of the officials of both the home
team and the visitors, to locate a
field upon which to play the game, the
Michigan nine was forced to leave Co-
lumbus without having played the
Buckeye team.
Grounds Too Wet
An attempt upon the part of the
home nmanagement to secure the
American association field for the
game failed when the ground keeper
refused to let them play upon it be-
cause, as he said, it was too wet for
a game.
For the same reason the University
grounds could not be used.
Despite the fact that the game was
called, excitement concerning it was
running high in the Buckeye capital,
and there was talk of asking the
Michigan team to remain in the city
to play Sunday ball. f
Betting was running high, with the
Ohio State fans looking for all of the
money they could get. The Scarlet
and Gray fans were of the opinion that
they could win from the Maize and
Blue.
Third Game 'Called
This was the third game in a three
day trip taken by the Wolverines,.
that was called as the direct cause of
the weather. ThedNotre Dame contest
which was scheduled at South Bend,
and the Purdue game to have been
played at Lafayettee, were both called
off because of the condition of the
grounds.
Despite the fact that every possible
effort was made by both teams, to have'
the game at Columbus played, it was
necessarily called off. Coach Lund-
gren said last night that he was sorry
that he didn't get a chance to play the
Columbus team. Every member of the
team, also expressed his regret at hav-
ing been forced to return home with-
out playing a single game.
The team arrived at 10:42 o'clock
last night in the city from the capital
of the Buckeye state. The next oppo-
sition to be given the Wolverines will
be in Ferry field, Wednesday after-
noon.

By a resolution of the Congress of
the United States, on this, Mothers'
Day, all the people of the country are
requested to display the flag of the
United States as a suitable tribute to
the American motherhood.
Many of the Ann Arbor churches
will observe "Mothers' Day" with fit-
ting sermons and ceremonies. A spe-
cial service for Mothers' Day will be
held at 10:30, at the Church of Christ.
The West Side Methodist Episcopal
church has combined Bible school and
preaching service to honor mothers in
special exercise and song. Mrs. . V.

Palmer will speak on "A Mother's
Message to Mothers."
John Mason Wells, pastor of the
First Baptist church, will have as the
subject of his sermon, "The Glory of
Mother."
"On this day everyone is desired to
wear a flower in memory of the one
who brought him into being and car-
ed for him in helpless years of in-
fancy," is the keynote of the day.
The Ann Arbor floral shops report'
a good sale of flowers for today. Spe-
cial bouques and favors have been
made up and are at a premium among
the students.

Jiother's Day being Observed
In Ann Arbor And Entire Nation

COMMITTEE ANNOUNCES FINAL PLANS
FOR CLASH BETWEEN, LOWER CLASSES

SECTIONAL CLUBS
GAIN POPULARITY
Plans for reorganization of the In-
diana club are being projected by
University students of that state. It
is expected that a meeting will be
held some time within the next two
weeks to put the old Indiana club on a
firmer basis.
For some time Hoosier students have
been advocating such a *movement,
and they have finally gained the con-
sent of Prof. Jesse S. Reeves to pre-
side when a meeting is called. Pro-
fessor Reeves is an old Indiana man,
hailing from Richmond, and favors an
Indiana club. The exact date for a
meeting to reorganize the club will be
announced later.
Two more sectional clubs are to be
organized by the Y. M. C. A. Monday
night at Lane hall. All men from
Calhoun and Shiawassee counties are
asked to meet at the Y Monday even-
ing at 7 o'clock for a short but very
important meeting. The purpose is to

discuss plans for clubs from
counties.

these

TWO NAVY
REACH

PLANES
TREPASSY

EXPERIENCED ACTORS IN,
COMEDY CLUB. PLAY
RICHARD FORSYTH AND HELEN
CADY TAKE LEADING
ROLES
By no means lacking ing'dramatic
experience, is the cast announced for
the Comedy club play, "Green Stock-
ings" to be presented on May 22 at
the Whitney theater.
Carrying the leads are Richard A.
Forsyth, '20, in the role of Colonel
Smith, and Helen G. Cady, '20, who
will appear as Cecilia Faraday. The
former will be remembered for the
character interpretations given in
"The Tragedy of Nan," "The Silver
Box," under the auspices of the Ora-
torical association, and in last year's
Comedy club play, "Miss Hobbs." The
leading part in the Junior Girls' play,
"Gold," was credited to the latter this
year.
Union Opera Stars
In the supporting cast will be seen
Elizabeth Oakes, '20, whose work in
the Classical club plays of the last
two years will be recalled by many;
Gilbert R. Byrne, '19, the George Jes-
sep in "Miss Hobbs," and a member
of last year's Union opera, "Let's Go!"
and Mabel Bannister, '19 ,who played
the part of the Unknown Lady in "The
Silver Box."
Elwyn G. Davies, '21, the gruff, kind
hearted father in "Green Stockings,"
gave first proof of his ability in "Come
On, Dad," in which he appeared as the
irate wife, Mrs. Broadhead. Paul A.
Shinkmnan, '20, playing the part of
Henry Steele, was a member of the
"Let's Go!" company.
Remainder of Cast
The remainder of the cast, including
Marian Bath, '21, who previously play-
ed in "Green Stockings" in Muncie,
Ind.; Carrie C. Smith, '21; Joseph A.
Avery, '21; Frank Andrus, '21, and
Edgar L. Rice, '20, are of unproved
talent.

Talks and Pep Speeches Will Prepare
Fresh and Sophomores For
Interclass Games
CLASSES TO CHOOSE CAPTAINS
AT LARGE FOR CONTESTS
Final plans for pep meetings, this
week, of the freshman and sophomoi'e
classes, and arrangements for the
Spring games were decided upon at a
meeting of the Student council spring
games committee, Saturday morning
at the Union.'
All freshmen will meet at 7 o'clock,
Wednesday night in the West Physics
lecture room and the games will be
explained to them. Speakers have
been arranged for. Besides telling the
freshmen what to do at the games it
is planned to get them prepared for
the coming conflicts with a number of
pep speeches.
Captains to be Chosen
The sophomores will meet at the
same time and the same place the fol-
lowing night to be addressed by upper-
classmen. Although the procedure of
the games is already known to them
there are a few new quirks that need
explining. Captains will be elected
from the classes at large at the meet-
ings instead of proportioning them to
the engineers and lits.
Members of the Student council will
attend the weigh-in of the tug-of-war
men. Freshmen will be weighed in
from 10 to 12 o'clock Wednesday morn-
ing and from 4 to 6 o'clock the same
afternoon in Waterian gymnasium.
The sophomores will be weighed in at
the same time and place Thursday.
The three teams of 40 men each will
be of the following weights per man:
Lightweight under 135 pounds, mid-
dleweight between 135 and 160, and
heavyweight over 160.
The same site used in former years,
has been rented for this year's tug-
of-war. The contesting teams will be
arranged in the same manner as usual.
All men entered in this contest will
have to wear tennis shoes.
Tug-of-War, Friday
The tug-of-war is scheduled for 4
o'clock Friday afternoon and the bag
rush, cane spree, and the obstacle
races for 10 o'clock Saturday morning.
Carl T. Hogan, '20E, is chairman of
the Spring games committee and is
assisted by William W. Hinshaw, '20,
and G. D. Anderson, '20;
"'QUALITY STREET"
SHOWS LAST TIME
Ann Arbor was given a third oppor-
tunity to enjoy the quaint atmosphere
of old England at the time of the
Napolenoic wars, when "Quality
Street" was again presented by re-
quest yesterday afternoon in Sarah
Caswell Angell's hall
The first setting showed with what
skill and detailed care J. M. Barrie's
play had been worked out. It was a
typical eighteenth century living room
carried out in blue and gray. An old-
fashioned melodeon, now so rare, stood
In one corner and when the prim,
dainty maidens and gallant military of-
ficers entered the scene, no imagina-
tion was needed to carry one back to
the "good old days."
Every member of the caste from
Mary Overman, '19, the quaint little
Miss Phoebe in curls, down to Donald
Williams, the dunce of the school, for
"genteel children only," formed his
part in the life of "Quality Street."
Winifred Parsons, '19, as Phoebe's
timid maiden sister, and Mildred Rein-
del, '19, the "dashing" Valentine
Brown were well adapted to their
roles. These three leading members
of the caste were supported by others
who displayed professional ability in
their minor roles.

BOARD0ANNOUNCE
SIX PUBICATION
MEN WITH WAR REORDS RL
PRACTICALLY EVEliY
OFFICE
CAREY AND CHOLETTE
WILL HEAD THE DAIL
Millar and Fagerburg to LaNage '
slan; Bachman and Prather In
Charge of Gargoyle
Appointments to offices on the se
eral student publications for the e
suing year were made by the Boa
in Control of Studet Publications at
meeting held Saturday.
Harry M. Carey, '20, and Paul
Cholette, Jr., '20L, were elected ma
aging editor and business manager i
spectively of The Michigan Dai
Carey held the positions of night e
itor on The Daily in 1916-17, city e
tor in 1917-18, until he enlisted
November, 1917, in the aviation ser
ice where he received his commissic
He is now news editor. Cholette w
on the business staff of The Daily
1916-17, and was assistant busine
manager in 1917-18 up until .A
spring when he entered the artille
branch of the service.
M1llar Heads 'Ensian
Bruce Millar, '20, was elected
the office of managing editor of T
Michiganensian, and D. F. Fagerbi
'20, to that of business manager. M
lar was night editor of The Daily
1916-17, telegraph and news editor
1917-18 until December of 1917, wh
he enlisted in the aviation service, a
was telegraph editor this semester 4
fore becoming city editor, which po
tion he now, holds. Fagerburg w
on The Michiganensian staff in 191
18, and now holds the posti ooa
sistant business manager.
For the Gargoyle, Reed Bachma
'20, was chosen managing editor, a
George Prather, '21, business manago
Bachman held positions on the a
staffs of the Gargoyle and the Mb
Iganensian during the last two yeai
Prather, for two years was crec
manager of the Gargoyle.
Wolverine Staff Chosen
Mark K. Ehlbert, '20, and J.
Robinson, '21L, were elected managi
editor and business manager respe
tively of the Wolverine, the tri-weekl
of the summer session. Ehlbert w
on The Daily editorial staff in 191
17, night editor and acting news e
tor in 1917-18, and successively ass
elate, efficiency, and telegraph edit
this year. He is at present telegraj
editor. Robinson was acting-busine
manager on The Daily for part of t
year 1917-18.
For the Students' Directory, W.
Weathers, ex-'20E,'21E, was app
ed managing editor, and Alan F. l(
'20E, business manager. Weathe
held a position on The Students' I
rectory in 1916-17, and was on t
editorial staff last year. King h
also held a position on the Studen
Directory's staff.
Inlander Not Decided
A. E. Zigler, '21L, was elected bo
managing editor and business ma
ager of the Athletic Program. Zig]
was a. member of the business staff
the Michiganensian in 1917-18 up un
he enlisted in the aviation corps.
Elections for appointments to t
Inlander were not made at this time,
SUMMER SESSION OFFERS
MANY DEGREES TO STUDENt

Among the degrees conferred b
work in the summer session of t
Graduate School are those of aero
autical engineer, mastor of landsca
design, naval architect, and doctor
public health.
The Graduate School conducts t
graduate work in all schools and c
leges of the University.
EX-SERVICE MEN-NOTE!
All students who, by reason of
military service, were prevented
from graduating before, and who
expect to graduate after the sum-
mer session of 1919, are urgently
requested to notify the secre-
tary of their school or college at
once, in order to carry out the
instructions of the Board of
Regents. A H G
ARTHUR G. HALL,

(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 10.-Arrival at
Trepassy Bay, Newfoundland, of two
qf the three American navy sea-
planes which started from Rockaway,
New York, on the transatlantic flight
insures the success of the whole enter-
prise, naval officers here believe. When
the report reached the navy depart-
ment tonight that the second of the
planes, the NC-3, had reached Tre-
passy Bay in today's flight from Hali-
fax after it had been forced to turn
back because of a broken propeller,
officers were unable to conceal their
deep satisfaction.
While detailed reports from Com-
mander John H. Towers, commanding
the seaplane division on the flight of
the NC-1 and the NC-3 from Rockaway
to Trepassy Bay probably will not be
received for a day or so, it is be-
lieved he would have communicated
promptly had he encountered any se-
rious difficulty either with his ma-
chines or with the arrangements for
guiding the flight by radio-compass
signals.

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
10.30 A. M. Mother's Day-The Communion Service will be
observed at this service.

6:oo Prof. T. E. Rankin speaks to young people.

6:30 P. M. Young People's Evening Service.

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