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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 10, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDA

FFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
lished every morning except Monday
g the university year by the Board in
ol of Student Publications.
BER OF TH4 ASSOCIATED PRESS
e Associated Press is exclusively entitled
e use for republication of all news dis-
es credited to it or not otherwise credited
is paper and also the local news pub-
i herein.
ered at the postoficeat Ann Arbor,
gan, as second class matter.
>scriptions by carrier or mail, $3.59.
ices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
ones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414"
mmunications not oexceed 30y words,
,ned, the signature, not necessarily to ap-
in print, but as an evidence of faith,, and
,s of events will be published in The
at the discretion of the Editor, if left
mailed to the office..
signed communications will receive no
deration. No manuscript will be re-
d unless the writer incloses postage.
e Daily does not necessarily endorse the
nents expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
nee Roeser..........Managing Editor
M. Carey..............News Editor
e Millar ............City Editor
ai Marx............Associate Editor
ias F. McAllister...... .Feature Editor
K. Ehlbert......... Telegraph Editor
i B. Landis.............Sport Editor
uerite Clark.... ..... .Women's Editor
ha Guernsey..........Wommen's Editor
A. Shinkman........Dramatic Editor
Apel............. Music Editor
Dailey .............Exchange Editor
ard Wohl............. Literary Editor
ISSUE EDITORS
ert R. Slusser Paul G. Weber
ad Sherwood Edgar 14. Rice
W. Hitchcock J. P. Hart
William Clarkson
REPORTERS
as H. Adams John E. McManis
rd B. Marshall C. H. Murchison
Iillis Mary D. Lane
na Schermerhorn John I. Dakin
rt W. Brown Logan Trumbull
mersonBSwart Stewart Baxter
Crozier Muriel E. Bauman
BUSINESS STAFF
d Makinson.........Business Manager

L. Abele.. .Asst.
nd A. Gaines .. .Asst.
M. LeFevre....Asst.
A. Leitziger..Asst
i'M. Maor....Asst.
l'R. Schoffuer. .Asst.

Business Manager
Business Manager
Business Manage.
Business Manager
Business Manager
Business Manager

SENIOR STAFF
Mark B. Covell Fdward Priehs, Jr.
Robert F. McKean Henry Whiting II
George A. Cadwell J. Duane Miller
Maynard A. Newton R. A. Sullivan
JUNIOR STAFF
Curt P. Schneider Isabelle 'Farnum
Harold P. Lindsay Geo. R. Strimbeck, Jr.
Harper Moore Arthur L. Glazier
James A. Kennedy, Jr.
SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1919.
Issue Editor--Paul G. Weber
THE MEMORIAL THEATER
Of all the suggestions offered for a
soldier memorial on the campus, the
one of a campus theater seems to be
the best.
A campus theater would be a mem-
orial in more ways than one. First,
and most important of course, it would
fittingly commemorate) the heroism
and self-sacrifice of the boys who left
to fight for their country.
But it wouldalso be a memorial to
those who erect it, just as Alumni
Memorial hall honors not only the.
revered dead of the Civil' War, but,
too, those alumni who made it pos-
sible.
Whatever form the soldier memorial
shall take, it should posses usefulness
as well as enduring beauty. A cam-
pus theater would do this ideally.
There has long been a feeling that
in the matter of dramatics Michigan
has, fallen behind. The courses -offer-
ed are more or less theoretical in
character, and if dramatics are to be
taught at all, something more than
theory must be given. There must be
a "laboratory" in which to produce
actual plays, so that the real technique
of the theater may be learned.
At present, the-only way this actual
experience is to be had is in the var-
ious dramatic societies. These so-
cieties are necessarily limited in their
scope, and appeal only to a narrow..
circle. A campus theater could com-
bine all the various elements, and
make possible more complete produc-
tions. It could also, and this would be
its most important function, nake
possible those courses in play-writing
and play-production which are so pop-
ular in some of the eastern universi-
ties.
Michigan has long recognized the
need for a campus theater, and The
Daily is proud to be the first to link
it with the proposed soldier memorial.
"If those are the peace terms, then
America can go to -," says Luden-
dorff. We've been there, Ludie, all on
account o) you, and that's why the
terms are like they are.

SCORS "AD"TRADITION
MICHIGAN'S ATTITUDE TOWARD
WOMEN DISCUSSED IN LIGHT OF
OHIO STATE EDITORIAL.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
Prof. John C. Parker, in his remarks
to the students on Traditions' night
in Hill auditorium, made the state-
ment that there are different types of
traditions-some bad ones as well as
many good ones, and that it is the
dty and privilege of the student body
to support the good ones and exterm-
inate those which lack the basis of
fundamental worth-whileness.
And in the same week the Ohio
State Lantern and the Daily Illini
came forth with duplicate columns of
free publicity for a local tradition, that
were nether flattering nor true to
Michigan men, Michigan women, nor
Michigan spirit. To have other college
journals copying and spreading the
report that Michigan men are lacking
that "innate sense of respect and cour-
tesy due a woman," will not heighten
the national prestige of their alma
mater; to infer that Michigan women
tolerate such an attitude will not at-
tract the highest type of womanhood
to seek education on this campus; to
herald abroad the natural conclusion
that Ann Arbor is a pattern of small-
town stuff will be no particular tribute
to the wholesome fame of Michigan
"spirit."
And yet' the Lantern was justified in'
its editorial viewpoint-justified in so
far as it described a local tradition
which, superfically, at least, -still ex-
ists on our campus. Had the repre-
sentatives of the Ohio journal stayed
longer and seen deeper, had they se-
cured the opinions of men on the
campus who are Michigan men in the
truest sense of the word, the unsavory
tone, at least, of their comment, might
have been altered.
As it is, a certain minor faction of
men on the campus who have not out-
grown the obedient stage of looking
at traditions through freshman spec-
tacles just because some sophomore
once told them to, are responsible for
the type of publicity that is going to
brand the University of Michigan with
"small-town" calibre Wherever the
Ohio State Lantern goes over an ex-
change desk.I
,Most traditions are good; this par-
ticular one, however, is busy demon-
strating that it is inherently bad.
Why not eliminate it definitely and ap-
ply the energy we expend in banter-
ing it into continual focus toward un-
ited campus support of some worthier
tradition?
A SENIOR.
WHERE ARE CP AND SOWN?
SENIORS OF 1919 CLASSES FAIL
TO UPHOLD OLD ESTABLISHED
CUSTOM
Editor, The Michigan Dily -
Just a word or two about Michigan's
traditions-a point not brought out at
the Tradition-Pep meeting Wednesday
night.
It has been the custom in past years
for the seniors, after swing-out, to
,wear their caps and gowns on Wednes-
flays ahd Fridays. But this year there
has been a woeful lack of evidence
that a senior class even existed. We
expect the frosh to wear his gray pot.
It is a tradition, one of the first a
freshman learns. It is just as much
a tradition for a Michigan senior to
wear his cap and gown, and even more
obligatory. The whole campus has

been criticising the underclassmen for
not living up to Michigan's traditions.
They may be partly excused because of
their greenness and ignorance of our
traditions. But there is no excuse for
a man who has been on the campus
four years not to know our traditions,
and do all in his power to keep these
traditions going. Come through, class
of 1919. Wear your caps and _gowns

MARY PICKFORD
-in -
Frances Hodgson Burneft's
story
THE DAWN OFA
TOMORROW
METHODISCT CHURCH
SATURDAY-7:30 P. M.
Students Welcome
MASQUES MERiT THEATER

Acme White Lead and Color Works,
conferred with Prof. A. E. White, of
the chemical engineering department,
Friday.
Daily advertising is a direct means
toward a profitable end.Adv.

' the

Michigan Favorite College Song Book . . . .
Michigan "M" Book, looss Leaf, Large Size . .
Mighigan "M" Book, Loose Leaf, Small Size
Michigan Memory Book, Black Cloth Cover, loose leaf with 'M"
or seal in gold . . . . ,
Michigan Souvenir Photos of Buildings and Grounds

$3.00
$2.00
$1.50
$3.00
50c

College
Gossip"

Ichigan Banners, Pennants, Pillows, jewelry, etc.
in great bariety
R UNIVERSITY
BOOK STORE

I.

was on a still hunt for dress acces-
sories yesterday, for she thinks that

the little things often make or

SUCCESS OF "QUALITY
POINTS TOWARD A
NEED.

STREET"
CAMPUS

her appearance.

mar

II.~

Don't Fail to Visit Our New Lunch Room

. .

Try Our Strawberry Shortcake

Editor, The Michigan Daily:
If any one questions the advisabil-
ity of a Campus theater for our Uni-
versity, the doubts must have been
dispelled after witnessing the per-
formance of "Quality Stree," Friday
evening by Maques under the direction
of Professor Nelson. For if that lovely
bit of sweet gentility and subtle
humor, so Barrieesq .e in itsdstyle and
plan, could be so successfully staed
as Masques have given it, practically
without any of the equipment ade-
quate to the needs of a dramatic so-
ciety's ambitions, what would not the
future hold with the institution of a
Campus theater at their command.
Indeed, one may almost say that a
new ere in Campus recreational activ-
ities has come, for therewere all the
laughs, all the heart fiutterings and
all the charm of the so-called "tra-
ditional campus productions" minus
any bourgeois elements of varied at-
tempts to stage a "Follies," and plus
the additional element of an artistic
presentation of an artistic theme.
Another splendidly hopeful feature
of Masques' achievement is the co-
operative spirit manifested on the part
of the various groups and individuals
who had no little share in making
the play a success. The orchestra, the
best available from our numerous
groups of campus musicians, furnish-
ed delightful music, and what is equal-
ly significant, it vas' donated by Mr.
Gornetsky and his players. Thepre-
sence of the Girls' Glee club as a
part of the between-the-acts enter-
tainment marks another significant
aspect of the possibilities of campus
achievements through inter-co-opera-
tion; and the little children who
helped make the second act were the
last word in help and united effort.
One might comment thoughtfully on
the vacancy of even one seat at the
initial performance. Whether it was
because it was the "first night," or
because the absentee students could
not see in the posters possibilities of
plays which recently have impelled
them to plan "rushes" on the theater,
who shall say?
Masques, it was splendid! From the
programs to the dear old grandfather
clock your achievement merits all the
congratulations an appreciative mem-
ber of the audience can express.
BY AN ENTHUSIASTIC SENIOR.
Engineering News
The postponed meeting of the A.
S. M. E. will be held at 7:30 o'clock,
Monday in room 345 of the Engineer-
ing building. Election of officers will
take place and an interesting program
is billed. Prof. J. C. Parker, of the
electrical engineering department, will
talk on "Electricity in Mechanical En-
gineering." A. D. Althouse, '19E,
and two other students will talk on
"Car Performance." Dean Mortimer
E. Cooley, president of the ntional
society, will attend the meeting.
E. R. Youngs, '15E, of the Detroit
Steel Casting company, conferred with
Prof. A. E. White, of the engineering
department, Thursday in reference to
new lines of work which the company
is contemplating entering. They are
relative to the production of high
gradecastings which will resist osida-
tion and scaling.
A new boiler feed regulator has
been received from the Copes Pump
company. This will go on the new
experimental boiler which has been
bought with the idea of experiment-
ing on scientific lines. The regulator
will feed automatically and eliminate
any need of a fireman or engineer.

Anton Kaufman, '17E, of the Sagi-
naw Ship Building company, is work-
ing with calculating instructors of the
marine engineering department on
problems concerned with his business.
Dr. C. T. Hawley, chemist of the

i.

Everything the Best

Tuttle's Lunch Room

338 Maynard

Across from Arcade

=. .

First of all, she wanted a vestee for
her suit. She got a good looking tan
linen one, and then she saw a be-
witching affair of white Georgette,
which she couldn't resist be~ause she
knew it would take the place of a

rRAOC MARK REtL UIji PAT . P

Michigan

MEN'S SHOES

blouse.

She decided on a set of white or-
gandie collar and cuffs for her new
voile dress. She almost chose some
of flame colored organdie, but the three
ruffles of narrow lace on the white
one's finally decided her.
Before leaving, she bought a flat
purse of navy blue leather. She
didn't intend to do it, but it looked
so well with her suit, she couldn't re-

of Special Merit
Our Stocks complete
No necessity of misfitting
The limit of value at any stat ed priCe
We especially invite comparison of our $9.50 and $10.00 Brown calf
and Cordovan Oxfords. Every pair guaranteed satisfactory.

Ssit.

..I
" . ,
VII,

We Feature Fit

Walk

- Over Boot Shop

115 S. MAIN ST.

.

- - - .

When she stopped at the handker-
chief counter; she only intended to
buy one or two with colored borders
for herself, but before she got through
she had nearly . a dozen, in every
imaginable color to !natch all her

See the New Cigarette Cases
AT THE
CITY CIGAR-STORE
110 E. HURON ST.

Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES

They are both delicious and
Wholesome

dresses and ties.

Dependable, Scientific, Drugless
EYE
EXAMINATIONS

MADE' AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St

;
,, -

f

Phone 590 for appointment
Emil H Arnold
Optometrist 220 S. Main St
WILLIT"S
315 S. STATE ST.
Sunday, Dinner

every Wednesday and Friday
Commencement.

until

/ Women
Dean Myra B. Jordan will not be
in her office Saturday, as she is out
of town.
Girls interested in waiting table at
summer resorts or small hotels should
consult Miss Louise Potter in Barbour
gymnasium.
Those who have not paid their
pj ;7dges for Y. W. C. A. work in China
sould do so immediately.
Dr. Pillsbury Given Ypsi Appointment
Dr. C. B. Pillsbury, '18H, has Just
been appoin ted city physician at Ypsi-

Gloves were her next consideration.
Some chamoisette ones in pongee color,
stitched in black, she thought would'
be good }looking and practical for
school wear. Then she bought some
Kayser silk gloves, just because they
so cleverly combined black and white.
With a cry of delight she pounced
upon the very thing she had been
looking for in hose-drop stitch stock-
ings! They too were Kayser make,
,as were some with lace clocks which

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:Io a.
in., and hourly to 8:xo p. In.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. mi., 9:05 a.
m. and every two hours to 9:o5 p. in., to:5o
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:4s P. n., 12:20
a. m., z:ro a. m., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. in. and
I1:20 p. m.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m
Phone 1620-R

12 to 2

5to7

"Shoot me, but don't send me1
to Russia," said a Bolshevik in
cago. Why not let him stay in
cago?

back
Chl
Chi-

Soup
Cream of Tomato
-Wafers
Olives Young Radishes
Roast Sirloin of Beef,
Brown Gravy
Roast Young Chicken
with Sage Dressing
Cut Wax Beans
Creamed Potatoes
Bread or Rolls
Salad
Sliced Cucumber Tomato
Dessert
Green Apple Pie
Fresh Strawberry Short Cake
Vanilla Ice Cream
Tea Coffee Milk
.Price 75e
Our Beautiful New Dining Room
is Headquarters for
MAY F"STIVAL PATRONS

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Sayings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $660,000.00
Resources.........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

314 . State St

Ann Arboi

she almost bought.

Suffragists have adopted the code,
Don't gossip." The men will' now

ave one thing less to ta

1k about. lanti.
love is worth Results are Important. Advertise in
or selling? The Daily.-AdT.

4w

I

-- _

!.

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