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May 10, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-10

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ter- - -F-
THE WEATHER k4bASCAE 4)t PF.
FAIR; SLOWLY RISINGYADMOTW
TEMPERATURE t r J"AD IHT SERVICE I
VOL. XXIX. No. 155. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 10, 1919. PRICE THREE(

CUSHI TER S
OF TREATY STUN
HUN -PUBLICISTS
NEWSPAPERS AND STATESMEN
QUAIL AT SEVERITY OF
DOCUMENT
ALLIANCE WITH RUSSIA
HINTED AS SOLUTION
"Rather Anarchy Than Such Slavery,"
Opines Berlin; Premier Says,
"Mailed-Fif Peace"
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, May 9.-The parliamentary
leaders of all factions who are in
Berlin to attend committee meetings
admit they are stunned by the sever-
ity of the proposed peace terms. Be-
yond casual comment, however, they
declined to discuss the Entente's con-
ditions or details or to forecast the as-
sembly's probable attitude.
A leading member of the Independ-
ent Socialists declared the peace of-
fered was wholly dictatorial and that
revision was possible only through a
world revolution.
Paris, May 9.-German newspapers
continue to comment on what they
term the "crushing terms" of the
peace treaty and to speculate as to
the consequences of the refusal of the
government to sign the pact. It is
even suggested in some quarters that
the Ebert government refuse to ac-
cept the terms and "go down in a
blaze of glory" rather than submit to
"such slavery."
The Frankfurt Gazette says: "We
are -at the grave-side of right. The
only doubt is whether it is also the
grave-side of the German nation. Nev-
er has murder been committed in more
courteous form."
Anarchy Preferred
Reuterj' Berlin correspondent in a
review of German opinon says the re-
mark heard on all sides in Berlin is:
"Rather anarchy than such slavery."
He adds that all the people are dis-
cussing the consequences of a refusal'
by Germany to sign.
A Berlin d spatch quotes Herr Geis-
bert, one of the German delegates, as
suggesting an alliance with Russia and
a stand against the treaty by the com-
bined military forces of Russia and
(Continued on Page Six)
ARCHONS, HONORARY SOCIETY,,
INITIATES 11 FRESHMENi
Archons, junior law honorary so-
ciety, initiated 11 freshmen laws Fri-
day afternoon. The men -taken in
were: F. C. Bell, Ralph Gault, Thom-
as McAllister, Arthur Zigler, Paul'
Freeman, Selden Daume, A. W. Lock-
ton, John Watts, John S. Perrin,
James McClintock, Lewis H. Mattern.
Following the initiation a banquet
was held at the Union with George
Struckman as toastmaster. McClin-
ock spoke for the initiates and Cecil
Andrews answered for the upperclass-
nen.

WYVERN COMPLETE
FINAL ELECTIONS
Final elections for Wyvern, which
were held Tuesday, will add the fol-
lowing sophomore women to the ranks
of the junior girls' honorary society:
Loise Vries, Marcella Moon, Beatrice
Beckwith, Mary Dee Lane, Alice Com-
lossy, Marguerite Clark, Alice ;iink-
son, Helen Master, Esther Paffen-
bach, Alice Beckham, Martha Seely,
Josephine McGinnis, and Allis Hus-
sey. The newly elected members will
be initiated the last week in May.
BANDO PLAYS T FIRST
SENIOR1 SING OF YEAR
ONLOOKERS MANY, IN SPITE OF
UNFAVORABLE
WEATHER
Beginning with popular airs and
light music, and ending with "The
Victors," and the "Yellow and Blue,"
the Varsity band began its series of
weekly open air concerts, given Fri-
day evenings at the campus band-
stand.
Seniors Entertain Crowd
Between numbers a small crowd of
seniors upheld the custom of past
years: that of holding a sing in con-
junction with the concert. The se-
niors entertained the crowd which
thronged the walks about the stand,
with such light college airs as "Sam-
uel Hall," "Behind the Hill," and
"Hamburg Show." "The Yellow and
Blue" was sung as a finale.
The concert began promptly at 7
o'clock, and came to a close at 8
o'clock. The throng which had gath-
ered maintained a considerable size
throughout the whole proceeding.
Though some of the listeners had re-
mained for only a few minutes, their
places had constantly been filled by
newcomers.
Weather Not Ideal
Although the weather had threaten-
ed to prove unfavorable for the con-
cert, there was no rain, and the chill-
ing wind did not suffice to deter the
band from playing.
The occasion witnessed the second
appearance of the band during the cur-
rent week; the first having been at
the mass meeting Tuesday evening.
'The second out-of-door concert will be
given at 7 o'clock next Friday even-,
ing.
REGENTS COMPLETE
TABLED BUSINESS
Disposal of old business held up
from the last two or three meetings
by the work of choosing a new pres-
ident for the University was the or-
der of the day at Friday's meeting of
the Board of Regents.
All other business was put in a
state of readiness for disposal at the
next meeting, which has been set for
May 23.
COMPANY E WILL NOT PARADE
UPON RETURN TO ANN ARBOR
Company E, Ann Arbor's own, will
not stage a parade upon returning
to Ann Arbor. There will only be
the short march from the car at Hu-
ron and Main streets to the Armory,
where the men will meet their rela-
tives. The members of the company
asked that rather than have a parade,

they be allowed immediately to have a
reunion with their relatives.
The members of the company will
be brought here from Camp Custer in
a special car. A committee consisting
of Col. A. C. Pack, chairman; Mayor
E. M. Wuster, Sid Millard, Herbert
Tnney, and Chris Donnelly will greet
the boys in Battle Creek and bring
them to Ann Arbor. At the Armory
they will be allowed a reunion with
their relatives.

PIANES DELAYED AT KLIFAX RECAUSE OF
NI CESSIT ITY OF MAING ENGINE UREPAIRS
NEWFOUNDLAND TO BE LINKED TO AZORES BY CHAIN OF AMERI-
CAN DESTROYERS; LAST OF GUARD SHIPS LEAVE;
LOST PLANE IS SAFE

(By Associated Press)
Halifax, May 9.-The second leg of
the navy's transatlantic flight from
Halifax to Treppassey, Newfoundland,
a distance of 416 miles, was postponed
today because of the necessity of mak-
ing minor repairs to the sepplanes NC-
1 and NC-3 which flew here yesterday
from Rockaway Beach, Long Island.
Trepassey, New Foundland, May 9.-
Newfoundland will be linked with the
Azores tomorrow by a chain of Amer-
ican destroyers. The last of the guard
ships detailed for the third leg of the
navy's transatlantic flight left here to-
night for their stations. Navy officers
here expected the aviators could push
through from Halifax today because
of the unusually favorable weather. '
It is believed the stay here will be
kept to a minimum because of the de-
sire to take advantage of the help of
the moon, which becomes full May 14.
Night flying will be necessary on the
third leg of their voyage, which will
take the planes to the Azores.
Chatham, Mass., May 9.-The Navy
i UAITYSTREET
SETS STANDARD
Second Presentation of Barrie's Play
Redounds Even More Than First
Is Credit of Masques
SETTING, SCENERY, MUSICAL
,ACCOMPANIMENT, EQUALLY GOOD
More attractive rnan ever, if possi-
ble, was the second performance of
Barrie's "'Quality Street," presented
by Masques last night in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall.
' The play is artistic from beginning
to end, not only in the acting, which
is unusually well done for a college
production, but also in the settings
and the musical accompaniment. The
scenery is the equal of any profession-
al show. Between acts, and during
the action, the music played by A. J.
Gornetzky and his assistant added
greatly to the enjoyment, as did also
the two songs sung by the Glee club.
Mary Overman Pleases
Mary Overman, '19, as the dainty,
precise, little schoolmistress Phoebe,
quickly won the hearts of her audi-
ence, and takes first place in a com-
pany admirable in its portrayals. Win-
ifred Parsons, '19, as her sister Susan,
also plays a difficult role extremely
well.
Mildred Reindel, '19, was "dashing"
Captain Brown, and dashing and
handsome "he" surely was. It is some-
times hard to reconcile men's parts
when played by members of the other
sex, but the audience had no difficulty
with the captain. He could not be
more real.
Ensign Blades, as played by Melba
Bastedo, '19, and Patty, as given by
Blanche Howell, '19, also come in for
special mention. Their humorous
characterizations enliven the play to a
great extent.
School Scene a Novelty
A novelty much enjoyed was the
school scene in the second act, where
several children do a delightful dance
under the watchful eyes of Miss
Phoebe. The little boy who wanted
to be caned is a Barriesque touch that
delights the audience hugely.
Masques is to be commended for
presenting as delightful a play as has
been seen in Ann Arbor for many a
day. Though some members of the
company stand out, it is because they
(Continued on Page Six)

seaplane NC-4, which started out with
the NC-1 and NC-3 yesterday in their
successful flight from Rockaway Sta-
tion, N. Y., to Halifax, on the first leg
of the transatlantic flight attempt, was
towed into Chatham harbor by a mo-
torboat at 5:30 o'clock this morning.
After repairs here, the NC-4 is expect-
ed to resume its flight to Halifax to-
morrow.
The NC-1 and NC-3 reached Halifax
at 8 o'clock yesterday evening, leaving
the NC-4 to descend to the calm sur-
face of the ocean because of engine
trouble. Frantic search had been made
by the navy to locate the plane which
was missing from the time of its de-
scent until the docking this morning.
Sighted by Guard
The NC-4 was first sighted this
morning from the Chatham aviation
station by the guard. The members
of the crew reported that they had
passed a night on a calm sea. Only
one engine of the seaplane was in serv-
ice, the remainder of the power hav-
ing played out.
Trying to Reach Port
When sighted the plane was trying
.to reach port on her own power. Sea-
planes stationed here were immedi-
ately sent out to give any assistance
needed,but the crew of the NC-4 sig-
naled that all on board were safe, and
that, although three of the four en-
giens had "gone dead," they had been
able to make considerable progress
during the night on the smooth sea.
The motors were clogged with oil
and the radio was out of commission.
The-descent had been made 100 miles
northeast of the tip of Cape Cod.
PARIS WENT WILD
--SASRVILI
Pollus and Yanks Are Swamped with
Caresses When Armistice
Made Known
WORK COMES TO STANDSTILL
TRUCE SURPRISE YET EVIDENT
"Never before in al my life did
I receive so many kisses as on the
evening of the day the armistice was
signed," said Lieut. Eugene E. Ro-
villain, in an informal talk before his
former students Friday afternoon in
University hall.
"Paris went wild, expressing her un-
restrained joy after four and a half
years of intense suffering and priva-
tion. Celebrations of every kind were
held and the boulevards were throng-
ed with smile-arrayed faces. Allied
soldiers were constantly surrounded
with bevies of pretty girls who in-
sisted upon kissing them all - much
to the embarrassment of the Ameri-
cans.
"Work of all kinds came to a stand-
still from the very moment that the
armistice was declared," he continued,
"and officers deserted their tasks no
matter how important, and everyone
experienced the happiest day of their
lives."
Lieutenant Rovillain stated that the
.truce came with the greatest surprise
to the French people and to the en-
tire world, and even as yet the world
cannot understand the docile surren-
der of the German sea forces. -
Freshman Bible Editors Appointed
Appointments of the men in charge
of the 1919-1920 Michigan Handbook,
the familiar Frosh Bible, have been
made by the Y. M. C. A. cabinet. G.
G. Whitney, '21, is the managing edi-
tor, and Blake Vinkemulder, '20, will
be business manager.

T-SQUARE ELECTS
OFFICERS FOR 1920
T-Square, society for women in the
College of Engineering and IArchi-
tecture, elected the following officers
for next year at its meeting Thursday
night: president, Helen Smith, '20E;
vice-president, Lawrence Sims, '20E;
treasurer, Juliette Peddle, '22A; sec-
retary, Ethel Fonda, '22A; sergeant-
at-arms, Mary Hirth, '22E.
GUARANTEE TO FRANCE
*EXPLINED BY WILSON
PRESIDENT CABLES TO TUMULTY'
REGARDING TREATY
SUPPLEMENT
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 9.-In response to
an inquiry from Secretary Tumulty,
President Wilson cabled today that he
had promised France to propose to the
senate in connection with the peace
treaty "a supplement in which we shall
agree, subject to the approval of the
council of the League of Nations, to
;ome immediately to the assistance of
France in case of unprovoked attack
by Germany."
"Happily, there is no mystery or
privacy about what I have promised
the government here," the President
cabled. "I have promised to propose
to the senate a supplement by which
,we shall agree, subject to the approv-
al of the council of the League of Na-
tions, to come immediately to the as-
sistance of France in case of unpro-
voked attack by Germany, thus mere-
ly hastening the action to which we
should be bound by the covenant to
the League of Nations."
ITALIAN DISPUTE
STILL UNSETTLED
(By Assocate.Press)
Paris, May 9.-The Italian difficulty
is as far from settlement as ever, ac-
cording to the French press, which as-
serts President Wilson maintains his
position and that it is not believed
he will depart from it in the least. He
pas not adhered, it is said, to the pro-
posed compromise by which Italy
would administer Fiume as mandatory
of the League of Nations until 1923,
after which Fiume would revert to
Italian sovereignty, the Jugo-Slavs be-
ing given a port a few miles lower
down the Adriatic coast.
The Impression in French confer-
ence circles is that Italy is temporar-
ily abandoning her claims to Flume
and will exact full execution of the
Pact of London which, as it involves
not only Dalmatia but the Dodecanese
islands, will raise the whole Greek
problem and singularly complicate the
stiuation.
WESTERN RESERVE
LIBRARIANS HERE
Visiting Michigan for the first time
since their tours of inspection of dif-
ferent libraries were started, a party
of 23 students from the Library school
of Western Reserve university were in
Ann Arbor Friday. They were under
the supervision of Miss Alice S. Ty-
ler, director of the Library school.
The party was first taken through
Hill auditorium, and then were given
a 20 minute illustrated talk by William
W. Bishop, University librarian. They
also inspected the different depart-
mental libraries, and- were then taken
through the main library, and the

press and bindery rooms. The party
was the guest of the University at a
dinner held at the Union.
Homoeopatblc Hospital Given Victrola
The children's ward of the Homoe-
opathic hospital has been presented
with a victrola and a number of rec-x
ords, the gift of Mr. and Mrs. L. W.
Killmar, of Ann Arbor.

ELABORATE PLAN.
FOR AMPITHEATR~
BEFORERESENTE
FORMATION AT "CAT-HOLE" SUIT
ABLE FOR OPEN-AIR
THEATER
WOULD SEAT 10,0 0 0;
COST NOT EXTENSIVI
Idea Suggested in 1915 When Olmsted
Agrees to Co-operate with City
and University
As a grand culmination to the pre
sent ideal of a complete University
comes the announcement that a pro
posal has been submitted to the Boar
of Regents for the transformation o
the "cat-hole," the large depressioi
or ravine near the heating plant, int
a huge outdoor ampitheater, capable o
seating approximately 10,000 people.
At their meeting in February, the
Regents ordered the discontinuance
of dumping of cinders and rubbish i
the "cat-hole." The reason is to be
found in a recommendation made three
years ago by the landscape arch tect
Frederick Law Olmstead.
Plans Started in 1915
In June, 1915, the Regents joine
with the Ann Arbor Civic associatio
in an agreement with Mr. Olmstead, i
accordance with which he undertool
"to prepare preliminary plans and
report for guidance in the developmen
of the University and the city." Aft
erward he visited Ann Arbor, am
made a first-hand study of campus pro
blems. The results were in part em
bodied in a "Preliminary Report Upoi
the Development of the Northeast Por
tion of the University Property," whic
was made ready in August, 1916.
This report had, as its primary pur
pose, to supply an appropriate con
nection between the campus and the
lands owned by the University in the
northeast part of the city. In dealng
with that problem, the so-called "'cat
hole" claimed attention as an import
ant factor.
Outdoor Theater- Suggested
Mr. Olmstead's recommendatin i
regard to it was as follows:
comes the announcement that a prs
"For the central portion of the 'ca t
hole' we have studied somewhat care
fully the feasibility of securing a
moderate cost what has often beei
suggested in general terms, namely a
large outdoor auditorium or theater
On the basis of a hurried survey o
the existing space we have estimate
that such a theater, with a capacit:
for an audience of about 10,000 people
can be formed here in turf, by rehandl
ing about 5,000 yards of material al
ready on the spot and bringing i
about 6,000 yards of earth for surfac
ing. The storm sewer now being con
structed to Washington street - wi
make it possible to drain the theater
when graded as we propose, by ai
extension drain only 300 feet long
We do not propose an elaborate Gree
theater with masonry benches, be
(Continued on Page Six)

-

I

ANGELL GETS APPOINTMENT
Washington, May 9.-The Na-
tional Research council an-
nounced today the appointment
of Dean James Rowland Angell
of the Universit Vf Chicago, as
chairman of the council for the
year beginning July 1. The
council was organized in 1916 by
the National Academy of Sci-
ences as a measure of national
preparedness and was reorgan-
ized a year ago under a presi-
dential order. Dean Angell suc-
ceeds Dr. George E. Hale of the
Mt. Wilson, California Solar ob-
servatory.

PUBLICATION ELECTIONS
The following men are candi-
dates for student members of the
Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications:
Harold Makinson, '21M.
Earl Cress, '20.
David B. Landis, '20.
Karl H. Velde, '20.
Burton A. Garlinghouse, '20.
William M. LeFevre, '19-'23H.
Ralph E. Gault, '21L.
Cecil C. Andrews, '20L.
Joseph V. Tracy, '20E.
Three of them are to be elect-
ed at the All-Campus election,
on May 22.

..

. MNWI

TODAY
at 2:30 o'clock
Sarah Caswell

uaility

Street

MASQUES presents
A Special Matinee
Admission 35c
Children 25c

A FOUR-ACT COMEDY BY J. M. BARIRIE

Angell Hall

Tickets at Door

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