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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 06, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the university year by the Board in
Control of Student ublications.
VEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and also the local snews pub-.
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
dichigan, as second class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, 43.50.
Oficies : Ann Arbor Press Building.
Pnones: Business, 960a; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 3a9 words,
d signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
pear in print, but ~s an evidence of faith, and
notices of events ill be published in'The
Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
consideration. No manuscript will be re-
turned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
sentiments expressed in the communications.

10

EDITORIAL STAFF
Clarence Reeser............Managing Editor

band, and sung by Michigan's stu-
dents, then he is not of Michigan.
All men and women of Michigan will
be at the mass meeting tonight.
WOMAN TO AIO0 SOCIAL
SERIE WORK IN CITY'
MISS McHUGH, OF CHICAGO, WILLI
COME TO BOOST RED
CROSS
Miss McHugh, assistant director of
the department of civilian relief in
Chicago, will spend Thursday and Fri-
day, May 8 and 9, in Ann Arbor.
Through personal interviews, Miss Mc-
hugh hopes to interest students of
economics and sociology in home ser-
vice work. Appointments may be se-
cured at Dean Myra B. Jordan's of-
fice in Barbour gymnasium.
Will Conduct Two Institutes
Home service training will be provid-
ed for cgllege students in two insti-
tutes to be conducted this summer by
the department of home relief. These
institutes are a continuation of the,
special training courses conducted
during the war to train workers for
this branch of the Red Cross.
Definite Positions Offered
Definite positions for properly train-
ed students will be offered by Miss
McHugh. She will also explain the,
work of the institutes and the re-
quirements for entrance.
While in Ann Arbor, Miss McHugh
will be the guest of Martha Cook
dormitory. She will interview stu-
dents in Barbour gymnasium.

ENLISTED MEN NOW
PERMITTED TO FLY
Proving that Uncle Sam's word is
as good as his bond, exams were held
at Selfridge field last week for enlist-
ed men who wished to become pilots.
Several passed successfully.
Permission for enlisted men to fly
is included in an order recently issued
by the war department. Before this
practically all the pilots were com-
missioned officers.
The air service is now making a
drive for 15,000 men and all who can
qualify will be instructed in flying.
This will make the greatest air service
in the world it is thought.
Enlistments may be made for one
year with no further obligations by
those who have had military training,
and for those who have had no milit-
ary training, enlistments are made for
three years. Selfridge is the recruit-
ing station for this district.
Adams, 117, Returns from Overseas
Sergeant Frederick Adams, '17, has
returned to this city after more than
a year's service in France.
Sergeant Adams was in the Service
of Supply in Paris. He was one of
the students in the quartermaster's
school of the University at the first
of the war. His home is in Jackson.
CONNECT WITH THE CONNECTICUT
MUTUAL
Life Insurance Co., organized 1846. My
educational course free to the right
graduate. Don't see me unless you
think you are a salesman. J. Fred
Lawton, '11, General Agent, 610 Far-
well Building, Detrdit.-Adv.

W1omen I
Seniors and freshmen will have base-
ball practice at 4 o'clock Tuesday afte
ernoon on Palmer field.
The old and new Y. W. C. A. cab-
inets will meet together at 4 o'clock
Wednesday afternoon in Barbour gym-
nasium.
Those interested in civilian relief
may make appointments with Miss
McHugh, who will be here Thursday
and Friday. These appointments may
be made at the office of the Dean of
women in Barbour gymnasium.
RED CROSS WORKER TO TALK
ON SOCIETY'S SUIMER SCHOOL
Miss McHugh, of the Chicago Red
Cross, will be in Ann Arbor Thurs-
day and Friday, May 8 and 9, to ex-
plain the plan of the Red Cross sum-
mer school for social training, to be
held for three months next summer.
She will speak in particular to the
women in the University sociology de-
partment, but no one will be barred
from attending her talks.
The Chicago school will be held in
June, July, August and September, and
will aim to teach the essentials of so-
cial work and relationships. Students
from the various universities of the
middle west are to be given an idea
of the school and its purpose. Those
who already have a good foundation
in sociology and who understand the
present day problems are the persons
who will be sought.

IMichigans

Michigan Favorite College Song Book , , , . $3.00
Michigan "M" Book, Loose Leaf, Large Size , . . ' $2.00
Mighigan 'M" Book, Loose Leaf, Small Size , , , , $1.50
Michigan Memory Book, Black Cloth Cover, loose leaf with "M"
orsealingo , . , , $3.00
Michigan Souvenir Photos of Buildings and Grounds . , 50c
.Michigan Banners, Pennants, Pillows, fewelry, etc.
in great bariety
UNIVERSITY
BOOK STORE

t .. ...

ALWAYS ASKFOR

ry M. Carey................News Editor
ice Millar................. City Editor
on Marx..............Associate Editor
Xmas F. McAllister......Feature Editor
rk K. Ehlbert....... Telegraph Editor
id B. Landis .............$por& Editor
guerite Clark. ........Women's editor
rtha Guernsey......... Women's Editor

w~nOr

Paul A. Shinkman........Dramatic Editor
Edna Apel.........Music Editor
Ruth Dailey.............Exchange Editor
Bernard ohl.............Literary Editor
ISSUE EDITORS
Herbert R. Slusser Paul G. WVeber
Renaud Sherwood dgar G4. Rice
Hugh W. Hitchcock J. P. Hart
William Clarkson
- RECPORTERS
Thomas H. Adams John E. McManis'
Richard B. .Marshall C. H. Murchison
Irene Ellis Mary D. Lane
Katrina Schermerhorn John1 . Dakin
Arthur W. Brown Logan Trumbull
R. Emerson Swart Stewart Baxter
Marie Crozier Muriel 9. Bauman
BUSINESS STAFF
Harold Makinson .........Business Manager
Agnes 14. Abele......Asst. Business Manager
LeGraud A.Gaines... Asst. Business Manager
Win. M. LeIevre.... Asst. Business Manager
Wm. A. Leitzinger...Asst. Business Manager
Donald M. Major... .Asst. Business Manager
Donnell R. Schofine.. Asst. Business "Manager

wmhb,

I C E

C R E A M

Delicious and Refreshing

OREN'S

At The Union

SENIOR
ark B. CovellE
bert . McKean
orge A. Cadwell
.aynard A. Newton

STAFF
Edward Priehs, Jr.
Henry Whiting II
. Duane iller
R.A. Sullivan

JUNIOR STAFF
Curt P. Schneider Isabelle Farnum
Harold . Lindsay Geo. RI. Strimbeck, Jr.
Harper Moore Arthur L. Glazier
James A. Kennedy, Jr.
TUESDAY, MAY 6, 1919.
Issue Editor-Stewart Baxter
There will be a meeting of the en-
tire editorial staff at 5 o'clock Tues-
day afternoon in the reportorial rooms.
A straw Vote for 1919-1920 managng
editor will be taken.
A FITTING TRIBUTE
The affixing of the Governor's signa-
ture to the appropriation bills for
Michigan marks the final step of
President Hutchins' endeavors for a
better University. The new buildings
now assured, together with the in-
creased salaries for members of the
faculty, will stand as a perpetual mem-
orial to the President, 'and constitute
a fitting close to his administration.
Whatever benefits the new appro-
priations will bring must be credited
entirelT to President Hutchins. The
two houses of the legislature passed
the bills unanimously, as a personal
tribute to him. From being indiffer-
ent and even hostile to the University,
as has been the case in former years,
the legislature has changed to a state
of almost enthusiasm for the cause
of higher education.
What the President has accomplish-
ed is more than increasing the Univer-
sity appropriations to an amount com-
mensurable to its needs. The im-
provements now to be undertaken
mean a great deal to Michigan. But.
the new spirit of co-operation that he
has caused to spring up between the
state and its University is of infinitely
greater value.'
For from now on, the University is
assured of the wholehearted support
and backing of the people. Whatever
it will undertake, the state will spon-
sor. The credit is all due to President
Hutchins.
TONIGHT'S THE NIGHT
Tonight's the night of the biggest
mass meeting of the year.
Tonight's the night when Michigan's
spirit is due to come back. It has
long been dormant. But it is not
dead. The mass meeting tonight will
prove it.
Tonight the freshmen, many for the
first time, will learn about Michigan's
traditions. Those of us who do know
them; will learn more about them.
None of us can afford to say away.
Tonight we are going to sing all
the old songs that have been sung for
generations of Michigan men, songs
that have traveled over the world
wherever Michigan men have gone.
Tonight we are going to hear the
band-and Michigan sonjgs played by
the Varsity band is a combination
impossible to beat.
If one fails to be stirred by Mich-
igan's songs, played by Michigan;°s

Although the Union building is a
fire-proof structure, special care has
been taken in placing around the
building emergency hoses and fire
extinguishers. About 12 racks of hose
are in readiness to be unhooked at a
moment's notice and when the build-
ing is finally finished a large number
of chemical apparatus will be placed
on every floor.
The size of the building is made
more evident by the fact that between
50 and 60 people are now employed in
the upkeep even though the interior
and decorations are not finished. Ac-
cording to Homer L. Heath, secretary
of the Union, when the building is
finally ready for use about 200 men
and women will be needed to keep it
in running order. About 50 , of this
number will be student waiters who
work only in off hours but the re-
maining 150 will, be employed all the
time.
Five wagon loads of pinkish grey
marble arrived Monday morning for
the showers of the fourth floor of the
building. The marble was ordered from
a firm in Tennessee last spring and
'delivery was delayed until the work
on the fourth floor was far enough ad-
vanced to permit its installation.
SCIENTIST TO TALK
ON "ANIMAL LIGHT"
Prof. E. Newton Harvey, of Prince-
ton university, is to lecture at. 4:15
o'clock Tuesday afternoon in the audi-
torium of the Natural Science building
on the "Nature of Animal Light."
Professor Harvey is said to have
made an extensive study of the chem-
ical "cold light" of animals like the
fire-fly, and to have been able to im-
itate it by chemical means. The pos-
sibilities of coimercial utilization of
the method will be discussed in the lec-
ture.
Much of the material used in this
study was collected by Professor Har-
vey in Japan and the West Indies,
and some of the dried substance will
be used in the lecture to demonstrate
its luminous properties.
According to Prof. Paul S. Welch,
of the zoology department, the lecture
will be of especial interest from a pro-
fossional standpoint to students who
are taking courses in the biological
sciences, chemistry, physics, and the
branches of engineering dealing with
lighting. The discussion is to be semi-
technical.
ANCIENT PALACE OF CORTEZ
TO BE CONVERTED FOR MUSEUXM
Mexico City, May 5.-The palace of
Cortez, in the suburbs of Coyoacan, is
to be reconstructed by the government
and used as a museum for relics of the
Spanish conquest. The structure, 400
years old, has been allowed to fall
into ruins. In the court yard are
ancient trees, under which Heman Cor-
tez and his familiars were wont to
rest. These are hundreds of years
older than the ancient building itself.
The chapel attached to the palace is
still in good condition.
Results are important. Advertise in
The Daily.-Adv.

Students of the University of Michigan are cordially invited to
inspect our new lints of
PARIS FASHIONS

SERVE-SELF

1121 S. U.

Novelties in Tailored Suits, Gowns
and Dresses
Newest materials, newest models, newest colorings,
lowest prices

We do our olin Cooking and guarantee Courteous Service
Try our home-made Pies and Cakes
Open 6 A. M. to 12 P. M. Saturday night until 2 A. M.
Tel. 2642

I

and

Glasses for Log Log indicator just
received at Wahr's University Book-
store.-Adv.
BOARD
Breakfast Steaks
$4.50 $5.50
539 Forest Ave.

$500.00
AND EXPENSES

s iouu r
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Exceptional opportunity for col-
lege men and women. Congenia
and interesting work. Application
must be made at once. State age
class and department. Interna-
tional Press, College Department,
ioo Arch Street, Philadelphia.

WMQ III
'APO""""

.'

1

Dependable, Scientific, Drugless
EYE
EXAM INATIONS

Phone 590 for appointment
Emil H Arnold
Optometrist 220 S. Plain St
\ 1A

1

I

F

Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome

I

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e stiva

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MADE AND'SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 987 109 S. aIn St.
DETROIT UNIP! D LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8;ro a.
m., and hourly to 8:ro p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., 9:05 a.
m. and every two hours to 9:o p. m., 0:so
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11 :45 P. iM., =8:20
a. m., r :ro a. m., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m. and
11:20 p. M.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-

Cs:0

$14 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Aol'Arbor Savingfs Dank
Incorporated -1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources ......... $4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

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