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May 06, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E WEATHER
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WARMER

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

XIX. No. 151.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 6, 1919.

PRICE THREE

||||||||||||||||| | |PR IC|E|TH REE

HUNS TO REGEIVE
THATY DOC UMENT
WEDNESDAY P3 M.'
WILSON, CLEMENCEAUI, AND
LLOYD GEORGE EXPRESS
SATISFACTION

MEMORIAL TO COMMEMORATE MICHIGAN
WAR HEROES PLANNED FOR CAMPUS

ITALIANS RETURNING
TO PARIS CONFERENCE
Japs State Int'ention to Return Sha.n-
tung Peninsula in Full
Sovereignty
(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 5. - The time for hand-
ing over the peace treaty to the Ger-
mans was set today for 3:30 o'clock'
Wednesday afternoon. President Wil-
son and Premiers Clemenceau and
Lloyd George visited Trianon Palace
this afternoon to inspect the arrange-
ments. They expressed themselves as
satisfied.
Paris, May 5.-The announcement
that Premier Orlando and Foreign
Minister Sonnino, the leading Italian
delegates to the peace conference, had
left Rome for Paris, and the further
news that the Belgian crown council
had given its assent to the signing of
the peace treaty by the Belgian dele-
gates regardless of the unsatisfactori-
ness to Belgium of the financial ar-
rangements, have resulted in relieving
the embarrassments of the confer-
ences.
These developments had the effect
of producing a call for a plenary ses-
sion in the conference to be held to-
morrow for the purpose of laying the
treaty before - all the participating
countries.
Paris, May 5.-The policy of Japan
,is to return 'the Shantung Peninsula
in full sovereignty to China, retaining
only the economic privileges granted
Germany and the right to establish a
settlement under the usual conditions
at Tsing Tao, it was declared in a
statement issued today by Baron Ma-
'kino, head of the Japanese delegation
at the peace conference.
Regarding the railway which is to
become a Chino-Japanese joint under-
taking, Baron Makino said the own-
ers would use special police only to
insure the security of traffic and for
no other purpose. The force would be
composed of Chinese. Such Japanese
instructors as the railway directors
should select would be appointed by
the Chinese government.
LATE WIRE BRIEFS
New York, May 5.-Two naval avia-
tors flying a naval scout plane at the
Rockaway Beach air station today
were killed when the machine col-
lided with the top of a 100 foot high
hydrogen tank.
New York, May 5. - The transport
George Washington, with Secretary of
War Baker and 6,528 troops on board
arrived here today. The soldiers are
members of the 32nd division. .
Columbus, May 5. -n Onthe ground
that meetings held in other cities to
expound Socialist doctrines have cre-
ated disturbances, city officials today
ordered the police not to permit Scott
Nearing of Toledo to make a speech
in this city tonight.
Strassbourg, May 5. - Representa-
tives of the Democratic party of Low-
er Alsace at a meeting here Sunday
adopted a resolution expressing sat-
isfaction on the definite return of Al-
sace and Lorraine to France.

(T. F. M.)
The University of Michigan plans a
war memorial to its great number of
children who have served in the world
war. For the Civil war and the con-
flict with Spain, Alumni Memorial hall
stands as a splendid and fitting monu-
ment to the glory of Michigan col-
lege men, who were the fighting cham-
pions of battles long passed. Today, as
al other universities and colleges are
formulating plans to express in en-
during ways, their recognition for the
heroic dead, and the victorious living,
interested discussion is taking place
on the University campus, and ques-
tions are being asked concerning the
nature of the memorial to be raised to
the "Men of Michigan."
At the University of Minnesota a
most gigantic conception is in way of
becoming a reality. It is proposed
that such a memorial consist of three
parts, an auditorium with a seating
capacity of 8,000, a great wall 250
feet long, extending from the audi-
torium to the campus, and an im-
NAVY A9IRMEN SET
FOR OCEAN FLIGHT
Three United States Hydro - Air-
Planes Ready for Start
Today

DAMAGE DONE TO PLANES BY
FIRE PRACTICALLY REPAIRED
(By Associated Press)
New York, May 5. - A score of nav-
'al aviators-youths in the twenties
'and early thirties, yet experts at fly-
ing-navigation and motor mechanics
were ready tonight -for a start soon
after daybreak tomorrow in their at-
tempt to drive three giant hydro-air-
planes of the American navy across
the Atlantic. With favorable weather
officially predicted both in the vicin-
ity of the home station at Rockaway
-Point, Long Island, and along the
coast of Newfoundland, terminus of
the journey's first leg, the air met ex-
pected to launch at least two, and
possibly all, of the three planes sched-
uled to make the cruise.
The NC-1, whose starboard wings
were destroyed early today in a fire
which also damaged the NC-4, was
nearly fit for the flight again when
darkness fell on a small army of me-
chanics who had worked on the Graft
for more than 18 hours.. The NC-4
had been completely restored by mid-
:afternoon.
There was a possibility that the
NC-1 might be, delayed in her jump-
off a few hours or even a day or
more, if necessity of unexpected ad-
justments of the new wings developed
at the last moment, but the NC-3 and
NC-4 were scheduled to take the air
sometime between dawn and 7 o'clock.
SCENERY DESIGNED
FOR MASQUES PLAY
All the scenery and property to bej
used in "Quality Street," the. annual
play of Masques, has been designeda
and supervised by Prof. J. R. Nelson,
director. He has had to contend with
the disadvantages of the size and
equipment of the stage in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall but has producedk
some successful results with it.
Two rehearsals are being held
every day and the production is near-
ing completion and will be fully ready<
for its presentation on May 8 andt
9. In speaking of the work of thee
25 girls of the cast Professor Nelson
said yesterday, "The production of the1
play has covered six weeksAOf inten-
sive work and I have never seen
greater loyalty and devotion."
Tickets will be sold today, tomor-
row and Thursday in University hall
and may also be obtained at Wahr's
book store. Inasmuch as the cafaci-
ty of Sarah Caswell Angell hall is lim-
ited to 400, the public is urged to ob-t
tain tickets as soon as possible.
S. S. ATWOOD, '18E, LEAVES r
SCROOL FOR ACTIVE WORKf
S. S. Atwood, '18E has left the
University to do appraisal propertya
work for engineering concernsr
throughout the state; Since his dis-a
charge from the navy he has been en-t
rolled in the Graduate school.c

mense campanile with chimes and a
bronze memorial bearing the names of
Minnesota soldier dead. Plans have
already been drawn up by the archi-
tects and the alumni association has
already started the campaign.
Bronze Tablets at Princeton
At Princeton a chapel with chimes
and bronze tablets is proposed, but as
yet not determined, while Wisconsin
is to have a memorial union and as-
sembly hall given by the state, as a
memorial to all Wisconsin soldiers.
The University of Utah has also been
suggested as a site for a state memo-
rial. An elaborate grove and system
of parks is being planned by several
famous landscape architects for Kan-
sas. A memorial hall is being given
to the University of Pennsylvania by
the state. At Indiana, subscriptions
are being raised to erect a great me-
morial hospital at the university,
while Grinnell has approved the first
drafts for a campanile and chimes.
To sum up the fundamental quali-
fications of a memorial, it must be
dignified and symbolic, reminding the
campus of the memories and deeds it
seeks to perpetuate. Furthermore it
must be useful to the undergraduates
and have some important part to play
in the life of the campus. Further
than purely a memorial, it should
serve the pu'blic use, as the men it
commemorates have served.
Public Benefit to People
Not only should the memorial be
beautiful to look upon, dignified In
use, but of large public benefit that
the people may be reminded of what
it seeks to remind them, not only by
its appearance, but by the service it
will yield to them as long as it
stands.
By commencement time definite
ideas should be fairly well formed re-
,garding the memorial, for it will aug-
ment greatly for its success and early
.erection, if the first reunions of old
classes since the end of the war agree
upon the nature of the second great
war memorial in University history.
M' ' E. F. M N
TO EMBAK NEXT WEEK
SECRETARY BAKER REPORTS
RAPID HOMEWARD MOVE-
{ MENT OF TROOPS
(By Associated Press)
New York, May 5.-The one mil-
lionth man of the American expedi-
tionary forces will embark for the
United States next week, Secretary
Baker said today on his arrival home
from France. The homeward return
of troops is progressing in a most sat-
isfactory manner, and he added that
the 300,000 a month mark would be
reached in June.
Mr. Baker left here April 7, accom-
panied by Warren Pershing, the gen-
eral's only son.
Army in Good Condition
Speaking of his trip Mr. Baker said,
"The American army abroad is in
splendid condition. The third army
which I inspected on the Germanj
frontier is beyond doubt the best
equipped in the world.- It is every-
thing an army should be in all its
departments.
Rapid Movement of Troops.
"The men are anxious to get home
and we are moving them as rapidly'
as possible. I expect to see the 300,-
000 a month mark to be reached in
June." '
Mr. Baker said he visited only one
embarkation camp, Brest. "Its condi-
tion is ideal and you can get the same
expression from any doughboy on this

ship. I did not see any of the others,
but I was informed that the same gool
condition prevails at all."
GREEKS EXPRESS GRATITUDE
FOR SERVICE OF RED CROSS
(By Associated Press)
Xanthi, Greece, May 5.-Greece is
indebted to the United States for many
things, but she probably will remem-
ber longest the aid given by the Amer-
ican Red Cross to the 50,000 or more
refugees who have been coming back
from Bulgaria and Asia Minor over
every road and mountain pass.
King Alexander, Premier Venizelos,
and the Greek government have al-
ready testified their gratitude for this
assistance which was made possible
through the generosity of the Ameri-
can people.

Prof. Gordon, War
Prisoner, Lands
New York, May 5.-Capt. William H.
Gordon, formerly assistant professor
surgery at the University of Michigan,
arrived from overseas today on the
transport Alfonso XIII, which brought
3,000 men of the 82nd division. Cap-
tain Gordon was recently released
from a German camp after being held
captive seven months. He was one
of the first medical officers to be taken
prisoner.
VETERAN NURSE MADE
HEAD SERVICE WORKER
MISS L l. IHAVEY APPOINTED
AFTER LONG SERVICE
OVERSEAS
Miss . M. Havey who has spent a
year and a half with the American
army overseas, has been appointed
bead nurse for this country in the
recently organized home service work.
The home nursing idea is to be car-
ried out throughout' the country, the
low physical standards set by draft
registrants showing its urgent need.
Considered Great Task
Red Cross authorities consider this
work a greater undertaking than the
war work just completed.
The plan is such that several nurses
will be stationed in each county. They
will give lectures at the schools on
social hygiene, will instruct mothers
in home nursing and will be available
-at any time to give advice on public
health questions.
Washtenaw will have seven nurses,
three are already on duty, two in Ann
Arbor, and one in Ypsilanti.
Those Competent Will Qualify
The University recently graduated a
class of nurses who will form thei
nucleus for the various county or-
ganizations. Only the most competent
will be put in charge of the work. All
who attended the University recently,
taking the home nursing work were
required to be trained nurses before
they could enter and it is planned to
keep up these requirements.
This district, with headquarters at
Chicago, established a record during
the influenza epidemic last fall by
placing 1,000 nurses in the local train-
ing camps within a week. The local
district composed of seven states is
planning to make another record for
efficiency in the new work.
SENIOR WOMEN'S
PLAY BY MACKAYE
"A Thousand Years Ago," one of
Percy Mackaye's most successful
dramatic productions, has been chos-
en for the annual women's play by the
senior play committee. It will be pre-
sented on Tuesday, June 24, during
Commencement week. The play, the
setting of which is oriental, is par-
ticularly well adapted for such a pur-
pose, having a large cast of all major
roles and about 22 minor parts.
Prof. John R. Brumm is directing
the play, which, according to tradi-
tion, will be staged out-of-doors in an
improvised theater. The class com-
mittee in charge of the production is
as follows: Hannah Champlin, chair-
man; Idabelle Guthe, Frances McDon-
ald, Marian Ackley, and Ada Arnold.
Preliminary tryouts for the cast will
b~e held at 5 o'clock Wednesday after-

noon in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
DR. BOAK TO TALK
ON "ROMAN TOWNS"
"Roman Towns in the Rhone Val-
ley" will be the subject of an address
given atx 7:30 o'clock Thursday even-
ing, May 8, by Dr. A. E. Boak, of the
ancient history department, before the
Classical club.
Dr. Boak has traveled all over that

TRADITIONS' DAY
TODAY
Time...........8 o'Clock Sharp
Place ..........Hill Auditorium
Motto:
"SNAP AND PEP"
Let's Go Michigan
T IE
LOAN SILES LESS THAN
HALF Of TOTAL NEEDED
SECRETARY OF TREASURY ISSUES
APPEAL TO AMERICAN
PEOPLE
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 5. - Imperitive
need of increased activity during the
remaining five days of the Victory
Liberty Loan campaign was indicated
tonight by the treasury's report that
subscriptions to date amount to
$1,803,730,000, or only 40 per cent of
the aggregate needed. This was an
increase of $145,751,000 since Satur-
day.
A plea for larger Victory Liberty
Loan subscriptions was voiced in a
telegram received Monday by The
Daily from Carter Glass, secretary of
the treasury. The message follows:
"The Victory Liberty Loan cam-
paign is two-thirds over, but subscrip-
tions have been reported for little
more than one-third of the loan.
"Is it conceivable that the American
people, who with heart and soul wag-
ed the fight for freedom, will permit
this loan of victory and thanksgiving
to fail?
"Our sons gave of their health, of
their strength, and of their lives that
freedom might not perish. There are
one and a half million American boys
in France and Germany. Now that the
war is ended it would be as reasonable
for them to dishonor the nation by
'deserting the flag as for the nation to
dishonor itself by deserting them. Is
it a large thing that we are now asked
to lend our money to pay the cost of
victory? Is American money less will-
ing than American manhood?
"Let every one of the millions who
have bought Liberty bonds buy Vic-
tory notes, and success is sure."
PROGRESS IN WORK
ON OLD EDITIONS
"Photo-stat" work on copies of the
Kentucky Gazette for the years 1787
to 1800, which is being done by the
Library, is nearly finished.
Eight of the volumes are already
completed and there are three vol-
umes at the Library at present to be
worked upon. The work consisW of
making facsimile of the original
copies. A completed set is worth $800.
There are at present 14 subscribers.
Special boxes were constructed by
the University shops for bringing the
papers from Lexington, Ky., where
they were kept, toAnn Arbor. Spec
ifications for the boxes included the
requirement that they could withstand
a railroad wreck. Two thicknesses of
pine are covered with asbestos and
that is covered with heavy. galvanized
iron, making a practically impregnable
case.
K. L. WEHMEYER, EX-'18, NOW
AT SCHOOL IN GLASGOW

Karl L. Wehmeyer, ex-'18, who serv-
ed more than a year overseas with the
American Expeditionary Forces, has
entered the University of Glasgow,
wnere he is taking special work. He
was formerly in charge of transporta-
tion in Devonshire, with headquarters
at A. R. C. base hospital 21.

NEWEST OF WOLVERINE TRADITIO NS
TO BE INAUGURATED TONIGHT WITH
FORMER ANTE BELLUM ENTHUSIAS

MARTIAL AIR OF "THE VICTORS"
WILL OPEN PROGRAM
OF EVENING
"ED" SHIELDS TO MOUNT
PLATFORM FOR ALUMNI
Meeting Will Take Permanent Piece
in List of Michigan Student
Events
LET'S GO, MICHIGAN
With a message of vital interest to
every student, alumnus, and member
of the faculty of the University, the
speakers at the first Tradition's day
mass meeting, to be held this even-
ing at Hill auditorium, will inaugurate
the newest Wolverine tradition. +
Starting with "The Victors," and
ending with the "Maize and Blue," the
-program of the evening will take lit-
tle more than an hour, while it will be
filled with spirited talks, yells, and
music, to once more instil Michigan
spirit in the student body.
Balcony Reserved for Women
Every student and member of the
faculty in the University, including the
women, are expected to be present,
according to the promoters of the
proposition, and for that purpose, the
first balcony has been reserved, es-
pecially for the women.
"Everything is set," said Ralph
Gault, '19, chairman of the meeting,
"for the program to start promptly at
8 o'clock."
"Ed." Shields on Program
"Ed." Shields, representative of the
alumni for the occasion, will arrive in
the city this afternoon, primed for the
event. His reputation as one of the
"big men" of the state, alone provides
a big drawing card.
Prof. John C. Parker will represent
the faculty. Ralph Carson, gryd., the
student speaker, having had the dis-
tinction of winning honors in the ora-
torical field of endeavor, promises
some pep in his address this evening.
"Snap and Pep" Is Keynote
All of the speeches will be short
and to the point. "Snap and pep" will
be the keynote of the whole affair.
With the band and Glee club on the
platform to assist in the musical part
of the program, and with a cheer lead-
er ready to keep the crowd on its
toes all of the time, the "snap" is as-
sured.
Assured as Annual Event
Tradition's day, which, according to
Gault, is assured as a permanent an-
nual affair from now on, will inaugu-
rate the. spring games this year. With
this in mind, the speakers of the
evening will urge the proper promo-
tion of the traditional events in the
University.
With Tradition's day an established
event, it will be changed to the fall
of the year in the future, that the foot
ball season may reap benefit from it.
,as weal as it being used for the pur-
pose of giving the year a flying start
in the field of student activities.
OPERA MEN GUESTS
,T UNION BANQUET
To celebrate the success of the 1919
Mimes' production, "Come On, Dad,"
and to thank the various men of the
cast, chorus, orchestra, and commit-
tees, the Union has sent invitations
to the 125 men to assemble at the
Union at 6 o'clock Tuesday evening
for a banquet.

F. C. Bell, '21L, general chairman
of the opera, will preside as toast-
master at the banquet, and a number
of the actors will be called on for
talk. Phil Diamond will entertain the
asse blage with some choice bits of
jazz. Knight Merrieless will render a
few songs. An assortment of im-
promptu numbers are'-planned.
Immediately after the banquet,
which is under the control of' the

BAND TRYOUTS
All men wishing to tryout for
assistant managerships of the
Varsity bando report to Edward
Tevis Edwards, '20, at room 328
Natural Science building be-,
tween 3 and 4 o'clock this after--
noon.

section of France, collecting a great
deal of interesting and valuable mate-
rial and doing a great deal of research
work, which will form the basis of his
lecture.
The nominating committee appoint-
ed at the last meeting will report and
officers for the coming year will be
elected. Because of this fact all mem-
bers are requested to be present.

Wehmeyer will return this summer Board of Directors of the Union, 25 of
and will re-emter the University in the the show men will be initiated into
fall. He was night editor on The the Mimes. The names of the neo-
Daily during his last year at Ann Ar phytes will not be announced until the
bor. dinner is over.

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