100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 03, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY

ie MhditigaD oUd
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
'UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
'ublished every morning except Monday
ing the university year by the Board in
trol of Student Publications.
,MBER OF TF ASSOCIATED PRESS
he Associated Press is exclusively entitled
the use for republication of all news dis-
ches credited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and also the local news pub-
Led herein.
ntered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
higan, as second class matter.
ubscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.5..
fces: Ann Arbor Press Building.
'hones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
eommunications not to exceed 3a words,
igned, the signature not necessarily to ap-
,r in print, but as an evidence, of faith, and
ices of events will be published in The
ly at the discretion of the Editor, if left
or mailed to the office.
Insigned communications will receive no
ssideration. No manuscript will be re-
ned unless the writer incloses postage.
he Daily does not necessarily endorse the
timents expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
rence Roeser ...........Managing Editor
ry M. Carey................News Editor
ce Millar .................City Editor
ton Marx.............Associate Editor
)mas F. McAllister......Feature Editor
rk K. Elilbert......... Telegraph Editor
id B. Landis................Sport Editor
guerite Clark............Women's Editor
tha Guernsey..........Women's Editor
i A. Shinkman., ........ Dramatic Editor
a Apel................Music Editor
:h Dailey.......... .. Exchange Editor
nard Wohl .............. Literary Editor
ISSUE EDITORS
bert R. SIusser Paul G. Weber
Laud Sherwood Edgar L. Rice
h W. 1itchcock d. P. Hart
William Clarkson
REPORTERS
mas H. Adams John E. McManis
hard B. Marshall C. H. Murcison
is Ellis Mary D. Lane
rina Schermerhorn ;john I. Dakin
hur W. Brown Logan Truniiu11
Emerson Swart Stewart Baxter
ie Crozier Muriel E. Bauman
BUSINESS STAFF
old Makinson........Business Manager
es L. Abele......Asst. Business Manager
rand A. Gaines...Asst. Business Manager
. M. Lel evre....Asst. Business Manager
. A. Leitzinger...Asst. Business Manager
ald M. Major.... Asst. Business Manager
Snell R. Schoflner. .Asst. Business Manager

APPOINTMENT OF MANAGERS
OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
Appointments of managing ed-
itors and business managers of
the following student publica-
tions will be made within the
next two weeks by the Board in
Control of Student Publications:
The Michigan Daily,
The Inlander,
The Michiganensian,
The Gargoyle,
The Students' Directory,
The Athletic Program,
The Wolverine.
Any student wishing to apply
for any of these positions should
send his application in writing
to Prof. E. R. Sunderland, Law
building, with a statement of his
experience and qualifications for
the place. All of these positions
carry salaries.
Jagnazine Review

I''

/ IW~LomenI
Juniors will practice baseball at 4
o'clock Monday afternoon either on
Palmer field or opposite the gymnas-
ium. A notice will be posted in Bar-
bour gymnasium in regard to this..
Regular attendance atrclass practices
is necessary in order to make the
team. Sophomores will also practice
at the above stated time.
Class baseball practices for this
"week will be held each day at 4 o'clock
as follows: Seniors, Tuesday and
Wednesday; juinors, Monday and
Wednesday; freshmen, Tuesday and
Thursday.
A baseball game between Helen
Newberry residence and Kappa Kappa
Gamma will be played at 5 o'clock
Monday afternoon either on Palmer
field or opposite Barbour gymnasium.
HEALTH SERVICE REQUESTS TO
REGENTS GET POSTPONEMENT
Action on the two requests of the
Health service which were placed be-
fore the Regents May 1, was postpon-
ed by the latter until May 23. The
requests were the authorization of the
Health service to inspect rooming
and boarding houses, and to make an
approved list thereof, and the addi-
tion of another doctor to the Health
service staff to take care of all the
eye and ear cases.
Chemistry Library Has New Books
New books received at the chemis-
try library include "Chemical Con-
trol in Cane Sugar Factories," by H.
C. Prinsen Geerligs, Ph.D., "Research-
es in Explosives," by Noble, and "Oil,
Paint, and Drug Reporter" for 1918.
The Students patronize The Daily
advertiser.--Adv.

College Students

Special

Sale

will enjoy

Madge Kennedy in
The Kingdom of Youth
ALso
Thomas Jefferson Morgan,
P.J. Q.
METHODIST CHURCH
Tonight at 7:30
Tax? "As You Like Is"

ONE WEEK ONLY

1000 Popular Copyright Novels
at 49c each, Regular price 75c
Come early and stock your library

WAH R'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

tlI

SENIOR
k-B. Covell
ert 1.AMcKean
rge A. Cadwell
nard A. Newton

STAFF
Edward Priehs, Jr.
henry Whiting I
. Duane Miller
R. A. Sullivan

3JUNIORSTAFF,
curt P. Schneider Isabelle Farnum
arold P. Lindsay Geo. R. Strimbeck, Jr.
Harper Moore Arthur L. Glazier
James A. Kennedy, Jr
SATURDAY, MAY a, 1919.
Issue Editor-Paul G. Weber
IS MICHIGAN UNSPORTSMANLIKE?
Michigan's athletes have always
been known as the best of sports-
men. Wherever they have appeared,
the most friendly feeling has existed
between them and their opponents.
This is as it should be in intercol-
legiate athletics. There is no rea-
son for intense, bitter rivalry. Both
sides should act toward .each other
in a gentlemanly manner, and in the
friendliest spirit. Michigan's athletes
have always done so.
The exact opposite is true of Michi-
gan's spectators. The worst kind of
spirit has been shown at the various
games, and the recent baseball games
are excellent examples.
A Michigan player is encouraged no
matter what he does on the field., A
player on the opposing team is hoot-
ed. Is this sportsmanship?
There should be enthusiasm at a
ball game. It can help a great deal to
bring about victory, and a team can
play its utmost when it knows the
students are behind it.
On the other hand, jeering the oth-
er fellow is the lowest kind of amuse-
ment, How would the Michigan stu-
dents feel if they saw their team
laughed and hooted at in a visited
ety' x
This form of unsportsmanlike con-
duct has become so marked in the last
few games, that the authorities have
threatened to take some action un-
less better spirit is shown.
It must be remembered that the
games are between colleges, and not
between professional teams. Profes-
sional players also act in a sports-
manlike manner, but it is not of that
high calibre that distinguishes the
college player. Why should not col-
lege spectators act in a like high-
minded manner?
The most noticeable trouble-mak-
ers at the games are the freshmen.
It is a unique play that does not call
forth some sort of remark by a first-
year student. The remark is then
taken up by others, until it amount
to an uproar.
This is not Michigan spirit and the
freshmen and others who practice
it should learn that it is not. Michigan
welcomes its visiting opponents as it
would like to be welcomed by them.
Both sides are friends. If the spec-
tators are ont sportsmen, they
do not represent the true Michigan.
Ann Arbor has the best milk in
southern Michigan. In fact, cream's
not In it.

The 1919 Michiganensian is expect-
ed to be on sale within two weeks if
nothing interferes to delay the press
or binding work. About two-thirds of
the printing has been done, and the
remainder is being hurried off the two
presses at a rapid rate.
Unforeseen difficulties arose tq de-
lay the book, and its delivery has
been held up considerably. Two press-
es are being run at present to speed
the work which had been retarded by
the mechanical complications.
This year's Michiganensian will be
an exceptional book, according to the
pages already printed. It is consid-
erably different than it has been in
the past. There are more than three
times as many illustrations, and the
general tone of the book is different.
It is military in most parts, but the
peace-time campus has not been neg-
lected.
The best part of this year's book is
that it will be up-to-date at the time
it is delivered. Events that are hap-
pening now on the campus are being
given space in the Michiganensian,
and there are writeups on even the
Soph prom and Frosh frolic. The
editor has held certain sections open
until the last minute so that the book
will be complete. The 1919 baseball
and track season events will be pre-
sented as well as the football and
basketball.'
For the first time in the history of
the book, the new members in the
campus societies and fraternities will
be run.. Ordinarily their names do not
appear until the following year. Ev-
erything has been used that will make
the publication 'typical of Michigan.

s a
Masques Assure
P'lay's Accuracy
With brilliant costumes and uni-
forms, imported from Chicago, "Qual-
ity Street," to be presented by
Masques on May 8 and 9, will portray
the military life of the Napoleonic
period, with professional accuracy.
While the play is not essentially a cos-
tume play, as its merits lie in its
characters and plot, yet the gowns are
an important feature.
The costumes are by Fritz Schaultz
of Chicago, whose library on cos-
tumes is probably the most complete
of any in this country, a fact which
assures a historical accuracy in the
reproduction' of the Napoleonic cos-
tuces. The military ball in the third
act affords an opportunity to use some
elegant uniforms and gowns which
will form a contrast with the simple
dresses worn by the quaint old ladies
in the other acts.
"Quality Street" is one of Barrie's
earlier plays and has been played over
650 times with unusual success. Miss
Maude Adams enjoyed a brilliant re-
vival of it last winter at the Empire

I Dont Fail to Visit Our New Lunch Room I

Tuttle's Lunch Room

338 Maynard

Across from Arcade

::=

McGregor Colf Clubs
Lee, Wright & Ditson and Spaulding
Rackets

Tennis'Ealls

Rackets Restrung

Try Our Special Sunday

Dinners

I AFTER EASTER SALE I

GRAHAM, formerly Sheehan &e Co.

Everything the Best

.....
r

Greatest Offering of the present season in
TRIMMED HATS
Come In and Let Us Show You

theater in New York. Masques
pay $100 royalty for the use of
play.

will
the

I Sunday Dinner

12 to 2

5 to 7

STEVENS & PERSHING,
1028 W

618 PACKARD
NEAR STATE.

IN

MWA

Soup
Willits Best
Wafers
Olives Young Radishes
Roast Sirloin of Beef,
Brown Gravy
Fricasseed Chicken with Biscuits
Early June Peas
Creamed Potatoes
Bread or Rolls
Salad
Sliced Tomato Read Lettuce
Dessert
Raisin Pie
Fresh Strawberry Short Cake
Vanilla Ice Cream
Tea Coffee Milk

I

I

Price 75c
A La Carte Service in Connection
After Party Lunches and
Banquets by Appointment

JACKSON
GIRLS'

SECURES
GLEE CLUB

Under the auspices of the Teachers'
club of Jackson the University Girls'
Glee club will sing at the Westside
Intermediate school in Jackson,
Thursday evening, May 22.
The personnel of the Glee club in-
cludes the following: Agnes Abele,
'20; Edna Apel, '20; Gertrude Benson,
'20; Winona Beckley, '19; May Blakes-
ley, '20; Dorothea Bristol, '20; Eila-
dean Brown; Helen Butler, '21; Flor-
ence Crozier, '20; Roberta Deam, '20;
Helen Davis, '19; Hilda De Barr, '19;
Elsie Erley, '20; Carrie Fairchild, '21;
Margaret Harrison, '20; Esther Hol-
lands, '21; Gretchen Jones, '20; Louise
Kreger, '19; Mildred Kirkpatrick, '19;
Beatrice McKnight, '19; Emily Loman,
'19; Jean McClellan; Bernice Nickels,
'21; Anne Noble, '20; Frances Glenn,
'19; Dora Osterberg, '20; Mary Lohr-
storfen, '21; Irma Robinson, '19;
Gladys Schultz, Ora von Eweyen, '21;
Marjorie Vftn Norman, '20; Endema
Williams, Rose Sturmer, '20, and Es-
ther Payne.
Emily Powell, '19, will be the ac-
companist.
Y. X. C. A. OFFERS ODD JOBS;
DEMAND FOR STUDENTS GREAT
Posing for an' art class three days
a woek is the most unusual of the
jobs offered by the employment secre-
tary of the University Y. M. C. A. In
a, dition to this winner, he has a few
b, rd jobs, a place soliciting insur-
anc. and many odd jobs that can be
done i spare moments in the morn-
ing.
The ermp'loyment secretary will be
in Lane hall every morning from 8
to 9; every afternoon from 1 to 2,
and 4 to 5:30, and will be glad to see
any students who wish to talk over
employment at these hours.
Keeley's Old-Fashioned Chocolates:
always fresh; 65c the pound. BUSY
BEE.-Adv.

I

WILLITrS
315 S. STATE ST,
Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES

ay

They are both delicious and
Wholesome

e

I

aI?

I

MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 8. MaIn St.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:io a.
in., and hourly to 8:io p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7 :48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., 9:05 a.
m. and every two hours to 9:os p. m., Io:go
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11 :45 p. In., 12:20
a. mn., i :zo a. in., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m. and
11:20 pi m.
WA T KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m.,to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-B

i

814 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

I

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The AnnArbor Savings Dank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources ........$4,000j000.0
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

I

I

1

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan