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May 03, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-03

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THE WEATHERI
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WARMEIL

LY

Sirtiawn, 4I atj

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIM
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 149.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 3, 1919.

PRICE THREE

HUNNA1VY TO BE
DISPOSED OF AS
VICTORS DECREE
WARSHIPS NOT TO BE SUNK; AC-
CORDING TO TERMS OF
TREATY
KIAO CHOW COMPLAINT
EXPECTEDFROM CHINESE
Italy to Accept Compromise Making
Flume Free Port, British
Officials Believe
(By Associated Press)
Paris, May 2. - The naval terms
to be embodied in the peace treaty
with Germany, which finally have been
completed, do not provide for the
sinking of the larger German war-
ships. The disposition of these ves-
sels is left to be decided on later by
the Allied and associated powers. .
The Chinese delegation to the peace
conference is expected to issue a
statement today concerning thessettle-
ment of the Kiao Chow dispute effect-
ed by the Council of Three. It is
understood the Chinese representatives
=will express their dissatisfaction with
the decision.
No formal program was announced
for today's session of the Council of
Three, but it was said unofficially that
the meeting was being devoted to odds
and ends and lesser details remaining
to be putinto shape for the final com-
pletion of the peace treaty. .
Rome, May 2.-The Italian Neuva
news agency declares it understands
the Italian Peace Delegation has re-
ceived assurances from Paris that the
conflict over Fiume and Dalmatian
territory has been settled in accord-
ance with Italy's desires.
It is possible that following a series
of conferences in Rome, Wednesday
and Thursday, Premier Orlando has
submitted to the Council of Three. a
compromise which is acceptable.
Paris, May 2.-That Italy will ac-
cept a compromise by accepting Fiume
as, a free port was the opinion ex-
pressed in British official circles to-
day.
President Wilson suggested that
Flume be' made a free port in his re-
cent manifesto on the Italian situa-
tion,
Paris, May 2.-If the work of carry-
ing out the last phase of the peace
negotiations progresses according to
the program outlined in Paris dis-
patches, the treaty ending the great
war probably will be signed early in
the week beginning May 25.
The treaty will be handed to the
Germans next Monday. Reports from
the Peace Conference indicate that it
is to be a "Victors' peace," and there
will be no oral conversations, except
the merest formalities, when the
treaty is handed to the enemy. Fifteen
days will be given the Germans to
consider the treaty, wth an addtional
five days or a week for the exchange
of views between the Allied and Ger-
man delegations.
Expect Peace May 27
Thus, at the latest, if present plans
are followed, May 27 should see peace
reigning once more between Germany
and the Allied and associated powers.
A secret plenary session of the con-
ference will be held Saturday, while

Monday a meeting will be held for
the organization of the League of Na-
tions.
Invites Italy's Delegate
Italy still is not represented at the
conference, but her ambassador is in-
vited to attend such conferences as
the regular peace delegation from that
country would attend. He has been
asked, formally, to be present Monday
to represent his nation at the fora;al
launching of the League of Nations.

Russ Ultimatum
Asks evacuation

SUCCESS MARKS
C, LOSE OF UNION'S
3-DAY CAMPAIGN

(By Associated Press)
London, May 2. - The Russian So-
viet government has sent an ultimatun
to Rumania demanding the evacua-
tion of Bessarabia. A despatch fro:
Moscow says that the Rumanian gov-
ernment is giving 48 hours in whic
to make a reply.
Bessarabia is a former Russia
province populated mostly by Ruma-
nians and to which Rumania has laid
claim. On the retirement of the Ger-
mans after the signing of the armis-
tice, Rumanian troops occupied the
territory. Four or five weeks ago
Russian Bolshevik troops after fight-
ing their way through the Ukraine
reached the Dniester river, the east-
ern border of Bessarabia. A Bolshevik
official statement reported that the
Rumanians had been defeated along
the border and were retiring to the
interior. The Rumanian government,
however, denied that its troops were
evacuating the province.
The Russian ultimatum to Rumania
may have been made in view of the
successful Rumanian campaign against
the communist government in Hun-
gary.
UNIVERSITY BAND TO
PLAY TODAY AT GAME
PROGRAM WILL BE OPENED BY
RENDITION OF "THE
VICTORS"
The Varsity band will play for the
first time at a baseball game this year
when it will appear on Ferry field
this afternoon during the Michigan-
Chicago game. As usual, the program
will be opened by the playing of "The
Victors."
The band will play two minutes be-
tween the half innings, which is the
amount of time that has been allot-
ed to it. The band will sit in-the
north stand throughout the game.
Members of the band will meet in
front of University hall at 2:15 o'clock
this afternoon and march to Ferry
field. Owing to the All-Nation Hulla-
baloo Friday night in which the band
took part, the previously announced
band concert was not given last night.
1922 ENGINEERS TO
INAUGURATE STEP
With the Armory decorated in the
class colors, grey and yellow, the
1922 engineers will give their first
Annual Step on Friday, May 16. Ike
Fisher's eight piece orchestra has
been secured for the occasion.
The dance will be semi-formal, men
wearing white trousers. There are
to be 160 tickets sold, though if the
demand is sufficient this number will
be increased to 200.
The class intends to make this an
annual affair during its career at col-
lege, and it is hoped that coming
freshman engineering classes will
follow suit. Tickets may be secured in
the following manner:-
Freshmen engineers whose names
are included between Abbott and
Foote, phone Eugene Harbeck, 1072M;
from Foster to Larson, phone Rus-
sell Persing, 885R; from Laurence to
Rubnikowicz, phone Wocester, 63;
from Rummler to Zidow, phone Dean
Ellerthorpe, 1741J.
PROFESSOR CROSS
BACK FROM ITALY
Capt. Herbert R. Cross, professor of
Fine Arts, who has been doing Red
Cross work in Italy during the past

year and a half, arrived in Ann Arbor
Thursday. While in the service, Cap-
tain Cross was absent on leave from
the University.
Pr'fessor Cross will take charge of
the fine arts department again at the
beginning of the summer session.
ORATORY RESULTS DELAYED
Up until this edition of The Daily
went to press, no word had been re-
ceived con ^erning the results of the
Northern Oratorical association con-
test in Evanston, fII.
An expected telegram from Prof.
T. C. Trueblood telling the outcome
of the contest failed to appear. Miss
Hoelzle and Professor Trueblood will
arrive in Ann Arbor tonight.

lW.

P. FAVORITE, 20E, LEADS IN.
DIVIDUAL RACE WITH
TWENTY-NINE

WAR DEPARTMENT PLANS FOR EARLY
RETURN OF YANKS FROM GERMANY
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 2.-The determination of President Wilson, indicated
in press advices from Paris, that no American troops shall continue on
German soil for a longer period after the signing of the peace treaty than
may be necessary to embark them for home, is born out by present plans
of the war department which expects the return of the entire American
Expeditionary force by September. Because of this, General March, chief
of staff, is making every effort to speed up the demobilization in this coun-
try.
An official announcement today as to the accumulation of surplus
clothing for the troops states that theestimates were based on "troop with-
drawal to be completed in September." The September date represents es-
timates by embarkation officials as to the maximum speed possible in
withdrawing the entire force in Europe, including the troops holding the
Coblenz bridge head sector on the Rhine. Officers anticipate that the move-
ment will be accelerated rather than retarded. The schedule has been ex-
ceeded recently with increasing measure from week to week, and with an
indicated monthly movement of 450,000 men, the best predictions of General
March, and his aides bid fair to be more than realized.

SCOUNT SHOWS 800 NEW
- MEMBERS; EXPECT MORE
Secretary Says Spirit of Undergrad.
uates Assures Completion of
Building
. That the undergraduates want the
[ new Union building finished as soon
as possible, has been shown during
the past three days by the outome
of the life membership campaign.
Results tabulated at a late hour Fri-'
day night indicate that more than 500
life memberships have been taken ot.
SThe campaign was to end at 11
o'clock Friday night but due to so
t many other activities at that time the
-final count will be made Saturday at
noon.
Expect at Least 900
"We aimed for 1,000 life member-
ships," said Clayton S. Shoemaker,
'20E, chairman of the campaign, "in
order to spur on all the men solicit-
ing. We may not make the mark
but we are sure getting over 900." An
accurate estimate of the number of
cards not yet turned in can not be
made as many of the men are count-
ing on bringing in many at the last
minute. -The keenest of competition
is shown by the men on the various
teams and the chart at the Union desk
is constantly watched to see which
team is ahead and which man has
turned in the largest number.
Team Competition Shown
So far, the team captained by W.
R. Frazer leads with 106. D. J. Port-
er, '21, on Frazer's team was high man
with 28, but at 10:30 o'clock W. P.
Favorite, '20Ejumped into first place
with 29. Running a close second to
Frazer's crowd is the team under W.
B. Weathers, '21E, with 102 to its
credit. R. F. Grindley, '21E, is after
the scalp of the first two teams with
100.
Next in importance to the leading
team are the leading men. Those who
have turned in more than 20 are:
Favorite, 29; Porter, 28; T. R. Gus-
tafson, 24'; E. H. Juers, '21; 23; H.
C. Skinner, '21, 22.
Completion of Union Seen
A small 'riot is predicted by those
in charge of the campaign about 11:30
o'clock Saturday morning when the
final tally is being made. Rumors that
some of the dark horses will appear
with pockets laden with paste boards,
adds spice to the contest which is be-
ing played to a finish.
"The whole-hearted support that the
men on the campus are giving in this
campaign practically assures the com-
pletion of the building within a rea-
sonable time," said Homer L. Heath,
secretary of the Union. "When com-
plete results are made known and the
alumni realize what the Union means
to the undergraduates they will un-
doubtedly do their best in aiding us
to finish the building."
SUMMER LIBRARY
WORK EXTENSIVE
"Success" will be the one character-
izing word of the courses in library
methods that will be given during the
coming summer session if present in-
dications hold true.
Librarian W. W. Bishop has an-
nounced that already a large number
of inquiries have come to him regard-
ing these courses. On account of this
fact and because of the varied and
large number of courses to be given,
he believes that this coming summer's
work will be the most successful of
any up to this year.
The courses will include all phases
of library work and will be given by
W. W. Bishop, F. L. D. Goodrich, W.
C. Hollands, Dr. Laura Benedict,

Misses F. B. Gillette, and E. A. Smith,
and assistants of the Library' staff,
besides Miss Sarah C. N. Bogle, prin-
cipal of the Training School for Child-
ren's Librarians maintained by the
Carnegie library at Pittsburg. Lec-
tures will be given by Prof. A. S. Root,
librarian of Oberlin college, Mr. S. H.
Ranck, of the Grand Rapids public li-
brary, and others. Visits will be made
to Ypsilanti and Detroit libraries.

DAEADEVILOF AIR
TO SP1AKTONIGHT
Captain Rickenbacker to Tell of Ex-
periences; Lecture Starts at
8 O'clock
RECEIVES THREE HONORS IN
MONTH'S SERVICE AT FRONT
Credited with the defeat of 26 ene-
my planes and honored with the
American D. S. C. with nine citations
for bravery, the French Croix- de
Guerre with three palms, and the Le-
gion of Honor, is the record of Capt.
Eddie Rickenbacker made with but
one month's service at the front.
Captain Rickenbacker will tell of
his adventures in the "Arena of the
Skies" at 8. o'clock tonight in Hill
auditorium. Besides the lecture, many
slides picturing Rickenbacker, his
machines, and his friends, some of the
latter being the most noted of air
fighters, will be shown. There will
also be shown a motion picture of an
actual air duel between a Hun and a
Yankee pilot. This is said to be the
only picture of its kind in existence.
Dare Devil in Air
It was just a year ago the first of
this month that Rickenbacker brought
down his first plane for which on May
14, 1918, he was given the French
war cross. May 17 he attacked single
hande three enemy Albatross machines
shooting one down and forcing the
others to retire. May 22 he attacked
three Albatross monoplanes and, after
crashing one to the ground, drove the
other two back.
On May 28 he went alone after six
planes, one of which he succeeded in
destroying. May 30 he was again suc-
cessful in shooting one down out of
a squadron of five which he had at-
tacked single handed.
These are but the most daring of
Captain Rickenbacker's exploits in the
air, more excitement crowded into one
month than many a person has in a
life time.
Pershing Commends Him
General Pershing cabled Secretary
Baker on the eve of the banquet held
in the Waldorf Astoria in honor of the
Ace on his return, saying, "The his-
tory of the American Air service on
the western front is as remarkable
for its sound and successful devel-
opment of aviation tactics as for its
spirit of unselfish devotion and dare-
devil gallantry, which is unsurpassed
by anything that the great war has
produced. Captain Rickerbacker has
written some of its brightest pages,
and on the behalf of the American
Expeditionary forces I am proud to
bear witness to our admiration for the
air service and for him."
70 KILLED, 500 INJURED IN
SAN SALVADOR EARTHQUAKE
San Salvador, May 2.-Seventy per-
sons were killed and more than 500
injured as a result of the earthquake
of April 28. The damage was exten-
sive in this city and nearby towns to
which the earth shocks were confined.
Washington, May 2.-Reports to the
state department on the earthquake
at San Salvador say the shocks con-
tinued until yesterday. Property de-
struction was great and the American
legation building was damaged, but no
Americans were hurt, the dispatch
adds.
The American charge at San Sal-
vador has been instructed to expfess1
the sympathy of the American govern-
ment and people to the the San Sal-

vadorian government.

HOULBALOO WINS
BIG ACCLAMATION
Entertainment of Cosmopolitan Club
Proves Unprecedented
Success
BULL FIGHT, NOVELTY DANCES
AND "JAZZ" VIE FOR HONORS
(M. M.)
A bull fight with real Spanish trim-
mings, a novelty dance, and some
modern "Jazz" vied for first honors
in tfie All-Nation Hullabaloo given by
the Cosmopolitan club Friday evening
in Hill auditorium.
The immense audience found it hard
to choose between them, and each of
these acts almost stopped the show.
All the other numbers ran them close
seconds, however, in one of the most
varied and entertaining evenings seen
in a long time.
Real Bull Fight
A real bull fight, with picadors and
matadors and all the rest was the
feature of the show, with the bull fin-
ally succumbing to the wily arts of
its tormentors. Not a little credit for
the act must be awarded the bull,
which played "Its" part admirably.
Gornetzky and company in some
syncopated melodies drew so much
applause that they had to be recalled
three times. Later, Gorney had an-
other chance to show his ability, when
Knight Mirrielees sang a few of his
songs. "Blue Book Blues" and "Come
On, Dad" were sung as only Mirrie-
lees can sing them. Then he and
Gorney composed a number of their
own, which went so big that they found
it hard to get away.
Polish Dance Novelty
The novelty of the evening was the
dancing of Miss J. Kruszka. Her first
number was a Polish dance, which was
followed by a Pierrot number with a
charming assistant not named on the
program. The act was one of real art,
and worthy of the regular stage.
N. R. Chavare gave an exhibition of
Indian mind-reading, Max Jaslow por-
trayed a vagabond to perfection in a
dramatic sketch, Knut Jensen played
two numbers on the flute, and a sex-
tette gave some string music.
Black Art Mystifies
"Chinese Black Art" was demon-
strated by S. Q. Wong, and to say
that the audience was mystified would
be to put it mildly. He makes skele-
tons appear and alarm clocks disap-
pear before you can wink your eye.
The Varsity Glee club made its first
appearance of the season, opening the
show with "The Victors' 'and "Var-
sity," and "'Tis of Michigan We Sing."
It made a good showing, and gave
pleasing promise of what will come
later.
A Success
The Hullabaloo was a success in
every way, and shows what the stu-
dents of the Cosmopolitan club are
capable of. The novelty of seeing
some of them in their native dress,
coupled with the real talent display-
ed, made the evening one long to be
remembered, and it is hoped the club
will give a similar performance every
year.
DANCING TO FEATURE MIXER
OF CATHOLIC STUDENTS CLUB
Members of the Catholic Students
club will hold a mixer and business
meeting at 2:30 Saturday afternoon in
the St. Thomas Parish hal. Dancing
will be the feature of the afternoon,
the business meeting occupying but a

short time during intermission. All
Catholic students are urged to be
present

HICGO DEFEATED
IN EARLY CONTEST
BY SCORE OFr7-1
MIDWAY DIAM6ND MEN FAIL T4
CONNECT WITH PARKS'
DELIVERY
MAROONS HERE AGAIN
FOR THIS AFTERNOON
Victors Rally In Eighth Inning Fail
to Bring Them Within Distance
of Winning Game
Michigan's 1919 ball team took on
step more towards the Conference ban
ner by defeating Chicago 7 to 3, Fri
day afternoon in the first of the tw
Maroon matches scheduled for the
week end at Ferry field.
Parks who held the mound for the
Ann Arbor nine was working too wel
for the Midway batsmen and present.
ed the latter with five hits scattere
throughout the game. A total of 1
visitors, forgetful that the plate pos
sessed corners that were being cross-
ed consistently, fell before the Wol-
verine pitcher on the strike out sys-
tem.
Tally Runs for Every Hit
On the other hand, Lundgren's out-
fit found Crisler early in the after-
noon and aided by clouts for extra
sacks and the unsteadiness of the
Chicago infield, counted runs for all
aits.
Captain Knode further upheld and
increased his slugging reputation by
pulling a single and a double out o
four official times at bat. The Maine
and Blue leader registered a sacrifce
hit and a stolen base and contributed
two runs towards the general suc-
cess. Of Chicago, Curtiss alone seem-
ed satisfied with Parks' particular
style of delivery and profited. b the
latter for three of the five hits re-
corded by his team.
Teamwork Good
Although Michigan was chalked with
six errors against the five earned by
the Maroons, the general teamwork o
the nine was good. A decided im-
provement in batting was shown over
the performance in previous games and
a run getting ability displayed itself,
which added a professional finishing
touch to the 1918champions.
The Maroons handled themselves i
a more unsteady manner, until the
eighth, when an air tight infield com-
bined to stop three successive Wol-
verines after infield drives.
Chi Scores in First
Cahn who opened the game at the
plate fell victim to Parks on strikes
and Mochel travelled the same route,
Curtiss, third on the list, delivered his
first single and Hinkle, the Visitors'
cleanup man reached first after hi
short drive had been slowed up In
the infield. Curtiss took third on the
last play and crossed the plate when
an attempt to catch the double steal
failed. Hinkle was tagged before he
could recover first.
(Continued on Page Three) '
LIBRARY SECURES
FIVE RARE BOOKS
Rare books, printed at an early
date, on mathematics and astronomy
have just been purchased by the Uni-

versity library for the departments
of mathematics and astronomy.
There are in all five books, one of
which is by an Englishman, John
Bradwardine, entitled "A Treatise on
Trigonometry" and two others. are
works of John Hollywood, who wrote
under the title of "Saccra Bosca," the
Latin form of his last name.
The librar'y is rapidly securing a
large and fine collection of books
along the lines of the above type.
The previously mentioned books
were inspected by the librarian in
New York.
FRESHMENI SOPHOMORES!
Eight freshmen or sophomores
are wanted -to work on The
Daily. See Millar today between
12:45 and 2 o'clock.

PARLIAMENT DISSOLVED
London, May 2.-King Alfonso
of Spain has signed a decree
dissolving parliament, says a
dispatch from Madrid. The dis-
patch adds that general elec-
tions will be held June 1.

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