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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 02, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WURMAY, MAY g, 11.

T

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ublished every morning except Monday
ing the university year by the Board in
itrol of Student "Publications.
MBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
he Associated Press is exclusively entitled
the use for republication of all news dis-
ches credited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and also the local news pub-
ied herein.
ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
higan, as second class matter.
ubscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.5a.
)fhces : Ann Arbor Press Building.
hones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
ommunications not to exceed 3oe words,
igned, the signature not necessarily to ap-
r in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
ices of events will be published in The
ly at the discretion of the Editor, if left
or mailed to the office.
nsigned communications will receive no
sideration. No manuscript will be re-
ned unless the writer incloses postage.
he Daily does not necessarily endorse the
iments expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
rence Roeser ...........Managing Editor

y M. Carey................News
:e Millar .................. City
on Marx...............Associate
mas P'. McAllister.......feature
k K. Ehlbert......... Telegraph
d B. Landis...............Sport
guerite Clark............Women's
ha Guernsey............Women's

Fditor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Edit6r
Editor
Editor

al A. Shinkman..........Dramatic
na Apel...............aMusic
h Dailey.............Exchangey
nard XWohl. .............. Literary

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

ISSUE EDITORS
Herbert R. Slusser Paul G. Weber
Renaud Sherwood Edgar L. Rice
Hugh W. Hitchcock J. P. Hart
William Clarkson
Ri4PORTE~RS
Thomas H. Adams John E. McManis
Richard B. Marshall C. H.Murchison
Irene Elis Mary D. Lane
Katrina Schermerhorn John I. Dakin
Arthur W. Brown Logan Trumbull
R. Emerson Swart Stewart Baxter
Marie Crozier Muriel E. Bauman
BUSINESS STAFF
Harold Makinson .........Business Manager
Agnes L. Abele......Asst. Business Manager
LeGrand A. Gaines...Asst. Business Manager
Wm. M. LeFevre.... Asst. Business Manager
IWm. A. eitzinger....Asst. Business Manager
Donald M. Major....Asst. Business Manager
Donnell R. Schoner..Asst. Business Manager
SENIOR STAFF
Mark B. Covell Edward Pries, Jr.
Robert . McKean ilenry Whiting II
,Ge~rge A. Cadwll J. D uane ~iller
Maynard A. Newton R. A. Sullivan
JUNIOR STAFF
Curt P. Schneider Isabelle Farnum
Hiarold P. Lindsay Geo. R. Stribeck,. Jr.
Harper Moore Arthur L. Glazier
James A. Kennedy, Jr.
FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1919.
Issue Editor-Renaud Sherwood
LITERARY WORK FOR ENGINEERS
The engineering college is consider-
ing whether its students should take
literary work in connection with their
technical training. The suggestion,
coming at this time, is worthy of very
thoughtful consideration.
The engineer has been coming more
and more to the front in the world's
affairs, and he will play a most vital
part in the reconstruction work now
in progress.
Engineering has advanced to the
front rank of professions. As such,
it has the right to demand men not
only well versed in their own line of
work, but also well educated in a
broad and general way.
If engineers are to take their places
beside the members of other profes-
sions, they must not be behind in gen-
eral learning and culture. A doctor
who knows nothing but medicine will
not make the best doctor. Neither will
a lawyer who knows nothing but his
law. Obviously, the same applies to
the engineer.
The engineer should take his lit-
erary work before he begins engineer-
ing. Law and medicine have found
this the best method. If the engineer
waits until he is a grad'uate before
taking his year in the literary college,
he may not care to continue, and more-
over his highly technical training will
most likely have unfitted him for study!
in the brother college. Nor do the
two lines of work go hand in hand
very well.
Let the engineer begin his University
course by a year or two in the liter-
ary college. Then he can go into eng-
ineering, better fitted both to be a
member of his profession, and a more
valuable member to society.
A professor at the University of
Minnesota asked ninety normal stu-
dents to spell ten words. The words
were: repellent, collectible, picnicking,
inoculate, consensus, inferred, sacri-
legious, dissipate, bilious, and vilify.
The best record was seven of the ten
spelled correctly. Are you a normal
student?
A negro proved his Americanism by!
showing a razor he had taken from a
dead German soldier. We'll bet he
proved it without. any argument on the
other side.
Chicago bakers want higher wages.
Evidently the dough is hard to raise.
A dozen strikes are on in Detroit.

The Bolsheviks have gone a-Maying.
Have you a little bomb in your i

APPOINTMENT OF MANAGERS
OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
Appointments of managing ed-
itors and business managers of
the following student publica-
tions will be made within the
next two>weeks by the Board in
Control of Student Publications:
The Michigan Daily,
The Inlander,
The Michiganensian,
The Gargoyle,
The Students' Directory,
The Athletic Program,
The Wolverine.
Any student wishing to apply
for any of these positions should
send his application in writing
to Prof. E. R. Sunderland, Law
building, with a statement of his
experience and qualifications for
the place. All of these positions
carry salaries.
iy
'Y'NOMINATIONS EADY
FOR CAMPUSELECTION
Nominations of officers for the Uni-
versity Y. M. C. A., to be voted on at
the all-campus election to be held on
May 22, have been made by the "Y"
cabinet and approved by the eligibil-
ity committee.
J. E. Goodwillie, '20E, and R. J. Mc-
Candiss, '21M, will contest for the
presidency, while H. B. Vinkemulder,
'20, and D. M. Thompson, '20, will run
for the vice-presidency.
Secretarial nominations are L.
Frost, '20, and W. K. Chidester, '20.
G. G. Whitney, '20, and E. Miles, '21,
are the candidates for councilmen at
large.
Owing to the fact that the existence
of the S. A. T. C. here this fall made
impossible a regular "Y" membership,
the election this year will be cam-
pus wide among the men students.
ENSIGN BRODERICK
RETURNS TO CITY
Ensign Joseph H. Broderick, '19, of
the United States navy, came on leave
Tuesday to Ann Arbor for the purpose
of making arrangements to continue
his course in the University. Hein-
tends to graduate with his class in
June.
Although still in active service, En-
sign Broderick stated that he expects
his release within the next week. He
is stationed at Hampton Roads, Va.
Ensign Broderick enlisted in the
navy last summer at Detroit and was
assigned to the Great Lakes naval
training station. Before beginning ac-
tive duty he was ordered to the Uni-
versity where the naval unit was or-
ganized. After two weeks of school
he was sent to an officers' naval train-
ing station where he received his
commission.
DETROIT CHARITY WORKER TO
TALK TO MENORAH SOCIETY
Miss Blanche J. Hart, superintendent
of the Detroit United Jewish Chari-
ties, will address the Michigan Me-
norah society at 8 o'clock Sunday
evening, in Lane hall. Her talk will
deal with practical social service work
in a big city, and she will lay stress
on the opportunities for worth-while
work on the part of sociology stu-
dents. Following her speech, Miss
Hart will conduct a discussion an-
swering questions on social service
matters.
Miss Hart is one of Michigan's fore-
most social workers, and is an offi-
cer of the National Charities' asso-

ciation, having been a delegate to the
convention of that body held in At-
lantic City last month. She is well
known by the faculty members of the
sociology department, and all are urg-
ing their students to attend the lec-
ture.
Bay Rum Barred in West Virginia
Charleston, W. Va., May 1. - The
sale of bay rum in West Virginia,
except when denatured, is in violation
of the state prohibition law, according
to notification sent to all druggists
by State Tax Commissioner W. S.
Hallaman.
The commissioner states that he has
not been disposed to interfere with the
sale of bay rum for legitimate medic-
inal purposes, but in view of contin-
ued complaints that are made re-
garding the sale of the preparation,
he is forced to place it under a ban.
Bay rum may be sold, said Mr. Halla-
man, when it has been denatured so
u t. make it absolutely impossible
as 4 beverage.
California Women Aid Dormitory
The debt on Alumnae dormitory was
decreased by $75 by an appropriation
made at a meeting of Michigan wom-
en held recently in Oakland, Califor-
nia.
Michigan women of the San Fran-
cisco, Oakland, Berkeley group, meet-
ing at the home of Nellie Hamilton
Ornhaum, '03, voted the money to-
wards the Alumnae dormitory debt.

Engineering News
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley and Prof.
H. C. Anderson of the engineering col-
lege are in Newark, N. J., testifying for
the Public Service company in a rate
case before the public utilities com-
mission.
The monthly meeting of the A. S.'
M. E. will be held at 7:30 o'clock
Monday evening in room 445 of the
Engineering building at which time
election of officers for next semester
will take place. Other important bus-
iness will come before the society.
Students and faculty will contribute
to the program. Prof. J. C. Parker
of the electrical engineering depart-
ment will talk on "Electricity for
Mechanical Engineering," and "Car
Performance," will be the subject of
talks by A. D. Althouse, '19E; P. W.
Steelsmith, '19E, and R. C. Voorhees,
'19E. Slides will be shown to illus-
trate the talks.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley, president
of the national society, will be present
at the meeting.
Louis A. Hopkins, secretary of the
engineering college is in receipt of a
letter from the American-Scandinavian
foundation, asking him to recommend
four students of good scholarship for
participation in 10 fellowships to Scan-
dinavian schools which are being of-
fered by Americans interested in de-
veloping a closer feeling between the
two regions.

WaomenI
The board of directors of the Wom-
en's league will hold a special meeting
at 4:30 o'clock Friday afternoon in
Barbour gymnasium.
Y. W. C. A. pledges for Chinese work
are overdue and should be paid at
once to Huldah, Bancroft in Barbour
gymnasium.
Courses in technological subjects
are offered such as physics and chem-
istry, hydro-electrical engineering,
mettallurgy, forestry and lumbering
which are particularly well taught in
those regions. A fellowsip of $1,000 is
given. Anyone may apply for this op-
portunity even if not recommeded.
COMPLETE ANNOUNCEMENTS OF
SUMMER SESSION READY
Complete printed announcements of
the summer session appeared yester-
day afternoon, five days ahead of time.
Due to the present limited number
they may be obtained only at the of-
fice of the summer session. How-
ever, the first of next week they will
be distributed to the offices of the va-
rious schools and colleges.
Michigan's paper for Michigan men.
Four thousand students read it every
morning.-Ady.

WAHR'S

For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come n denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.

S*pecial

Y

Sale

ONE WEEK ONLY

1000 Popular Copyright Novels
at 49c each, Regular price 75c
Come early and stock your library

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

ASK US

Farmers Mechanics Bank
101-10$5 . Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

FRESH EVERY FRIDAY

MARTHA WASHINGTON CANDIES

T I C E 'S, 117 South Main St.

r
t

McGregor Golf Clubs
Lee, Wright & Ditson and Spaulding
Rackets

What is it?
A MAY DANCE

Tennis Balls

Raokets Restrung

Where is it?

GRAHAM, formerly Sheehan & Co.

ST. THOS. HALL
When is it?
Friday, May 2, 1919,081:30 p.m m
mrusic--Phil Diamond and other jelvels.

CONNECT WITH THE CONNECTICUT
MUTUAL
Life Insurance Co.,organized 1846. My
educational course free to the right
graduate. Don't see me unless you
think you are a salesman. L. Fred
Lawton, '11, General Agent, 610 Par-
well Building, Detroit.-Ady.
Student' read The Daily.-AdY.

I

BOARD
Breakfast SteaksI
4. 0 $5.50
539 Forest Ave.

This Invites Everyone

Admilston Sic

WANmi

THE RAINY
SEASON IS HERE

t
UWA

2700 WITH
2100Y1U

I

Call Us
A Trial Solicited
INDEPENDENT

TAXI CO.

I

Shorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping

a

C

I

0

H-amgilton Business
SCollege
State and William Sts. I
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8 :xo a.
m., and hourly to 8: ro p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6 :ooa. M., 9:os a.
m. and every two hours to 9:05 p. in., io:5o
p. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. m., 19:20
a. m., x :io a. m., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. m. and
11:40 p. im.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1420"B
514 8 State St. Ann Arbor

Cl

I

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The AnnArhor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1868
Capital and Surplus, $56,000.00
Resoares $........ $4~000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

NNW

I

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