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May 02, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NI

.... .

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WARMEXI

it I m&i

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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VOL. XXIX. No. 148. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 2, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

CLEVELND SOCIALISTS RN AMUCK IN MAY-DAY
DEMONSTRA TION: NUMEROUS CSUALTIES ENSUE

Ann Arbor Drinks Purest Milk Of
Any City In Southern richigan

DEAN J. R. ANGEL APPEARS BEFORE REGENTS;
NO ACTION TAKEN ON PRESIDENCY QUESTI

MAN KILLED, 11 POLICEMEN SHOT
100 SERIOUSLY WOUNDED I
GENERAL MELEE
60 RIOTERS ARRESTED;
TANKS DISPERSE MOBS
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, May 1 .-An unidentifie
man was killed by a detective's bullet
11 policemen were shot and beaten
and about 100 persons seriousl
wounded in general rioting late thi
afternoon which marked a Socialis
May day demonstration here. Abou
30 persons injured are in hospitals
while scores of others, including wom
en, were trampled by rioters and club
bed by the police.
Socialist headquarters were wrecked
by civilians bent on putting an end
to the demonstrations.
Army Tanks In Play ,
Socialists and sympathizers in the
public square were ridden down by
mounted police and by soldiers in army
tanks and trucks.
Sixty of the rioters were arrsted. A
score of them were found to have
weapons on them.
The trouble started on Superior ave-
nue where the head of one of the
five Socialist parades scheduled to
meet at Public square was stopped and
the Liberty Loan workers tore a red
flag from a man at the head of the
marchers.
In less than 10 minutes riots had
developed at several other points.
The trouble in the square started
when an army man tore the red flag
from several Socialists on the plat-
form. Several of the men fired shots.
Mounted police and several soldiers
manning an army tank and two big
trucks charged pell mell into the bat-
tie, dispersing the mob.
New York May 1.-The offices of the
New York Call, the Socialist local
newspaper, were raided late today by a
crowd of soldiers and sailors who de-
clared their attention was attracted
by Bolshevist poster on the outside of
the building.
Detroit, May 1.-Ten thousand men
are now idle in the city, 6,000 of whom
declared a 24 hour strike. Employ-
ers expect all of the May-day demon-
strators back to work tomorrow morn-
ing. The radicals attempted a parade,
but were d sjersed semi-peacefully by
the police.
Chicago, May 1.-A score of arrests
were made in May-day demonstrations
of radicals in Chicago today. An all
day reign of police activity had the
effect of quenching any revolutionary
movement that may be struggling for
admission.
LIFE MEMBERSHIPS
IN UNION AT $45
Freshmen, sophomores, and juniors
who wish to subscribe for life mem-
berships in the Michigan Union dur-
ing the present campaign may begin
payments on their $50 fee at once, ac-
cording to Don Springer, '19E, pres-
ident of the Union.
The first of the five annual install-
ments may be paid the present school
year and the others each succeeding
year, with the exception that during
the students' senior year the install-
ment will amount to only $5 rather
than the $5 fee that the student pays
with his tuition in his senior year,
thus making the total cost of life
membership, $45 rather than $50.
The $5 fee paid with the student's
tuition during his freshmen, sopho-
more, and junior years will not be
deducted in the installments paid dur-
ing those years.
ORDER INVITATIONS
Senior lits may place orders
for invitations and announce-
ments for the last time from 9

f to 12 and 2 to 5 o'clock today
in the wating room of Dean Ef-
finger's office. No orders will be
accepted later than this after-
noon.

,
BELIEVE ALL BOMBS FOUND
Washington, May 1. - Belief
was expressed by postoice of-
ficials tonight that most, if not
all, the bombs mailed from New
York as part of the anarchist
May-day plot against the lives of
d ( public men had been found.
t ( Unusual precautions were tak-
en in Washington today to pro
tect cabinet members and court
s officials from bomb attacks.
t There were similar precautions
t in other cities. Meanwhile the
, entire postal service was seeking
- and watching to pick up stray
infernal machines.
3 I --
OHIO STATE PRESIDENT
NAMD JUNE SPEAKER
WILLIAM OXLEY THOMPSON TO
DELIVER FAREWELL ADDRESS
TO 1919 CLASSES
William Oxley Thompson, president
of Ohio State university and an or-
dained Presbyterian minister, was an-
nounced yesterday as the speaker who
will deliver the baccalaureate address
to this year's graduating classes. The
farewell sermon will be given on Sun-
day, June 22, in Hill auditorium.
Since 1899, President Thompson has
been the executive of the Ohio univer-
sity, and on two different occasions
during this time the University of
Michigan was fortunate in having him
speak here. At the commemoration
exercises of the seventy-fifth anniver-
sary of the University, which was held
during the commencement week in
June, 1912, he spoke as the represen-
tative of the state universities of the
country.
In the exercises for the graduating
rclasses in June, 1915, , President
Thompson delivered the commence-
ment address. Atthis time the Uni-
versity conferred upon him the hon-
orary degree of doctor of laws, rec-
ognizing him as "an educator of sterl-
ing worth and large and varied ex-
perience."
President Thompson had been a
minister and a missionary, and presi-
dent of Lonmont college and Miami
university before becoming president
of the Ohio State university.
MORE DAILY CUBS
GET FREE SODAS
Graduation exercises for eight mem-
bers of the Michigan Daily Cubs' club
were held yesterday afternoon in a
local soft-drink emporium. The spoon-
fuls were interspersed with short talks
by various members of the staff.
The eight men who completed their
novitiate as cub reporters are: Thom-
as H. Adams, '22; John I. Dakin, '22;
Brewster Campbell, '22; Walter X
Brennan, '22E; William H. Riley, '22;
J. E. Johnson, '22; Arthur W. Brown,
'20; and Logan Trumbull, '21.
OFFICERS COMMISSIONED AT
SHERIDAN TO MEET AT UNION
Men who received their commissions
at Fort Sheridan will meet at 7
o'clock Tuesday, May 6, in the room
across from the billiard room in the
new Michigan Union building.
Plans for a smoker and election of.
officers will be among the matters up-
on which action will be taken. Sev-
eral informal talks will be given by
overseas officers. It is estimated that
there are at least 60 men on the cam-
pus who reecived their commissions
at Fort Sheridan.
Arrangements Made for B. V. D. Dance
Arrangements for the B. V. D. dance
to be given Friday, May 9, in the
Union are being made by the commit-
tees of the three societies. It has not
yet been definitely decided whether or
not the dance will be informal or not.

Feature entertainments are being
devised by the committees. An Ann
Arbor orchestra has been hired for the
occasion and will probm'hly play from
9 to 1 o'clock.

Examinations, made at least three
times a month, of the Ann Arbor milk
supply show it to be the best of any
city in southern Michigan.
Of the 2,500 gallons of milk used
daily in this city about 90 per cent go
through the Ann Arbor dairy, the re-
maining portion being distributed
mostly by the McCall Dairy company
and a small amount by private deal-
ers.
Milk is divided into three classes,
certified, inspected, and market milk.
Certified milk first came into existence
in 1892 when Dr. Coit of Newark, New

Jersey, wanted pure milk which had
not been pasteurized for his baby. To
obtain this he made certain agree-
ments with a afrmer who did what
Doctor Coit wanted.
Those requirements were increased
until they now include that all cows
must be tested for tuberculosis, that
the cows shall not be allowed to graze
in the fields, not even in summer for
fear they might pick up some, disease.
Theytalso require that all stables be
well ventilated and lighted, having a
specified amount of window space for
(Continued on Page Six)

SPIGGAE'E
MEETING TO ROUSE
STUDENT SPIRIT,

VAUDEVILLE AT ITS
BEST IN TONIGHT'S
BIG "HULLABALOO"

HILL A UDITORIUM SECUREID
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
OCCASION

BY

ACTS VARY FROM MYSTICS
INDIA TO BULL FIGHTS
OF SPAIN

OF

TUESDAY NIGHT SET I
AS DATE FOR EVENT
Freshmen Especially Urged to Attend
for Instruction in College
Traditions
A monster mass meeting in which
the entire University will participate,
will innaugurate the spring games
this year. the Student council has an-
nounced.
Plans are on foot for making the
meeting the largest and most import-
ant of the year, and for this purpose
a special program is being arranged.
By virtue of the lack of spirit in
the University caused by the distract-
ing influence of a warring nation, the
council has come to the conclusion
that a mass meeting of this kind is
the only thing that will again waken
the spirit of the University.
Date Climged to Tuesday .
The original date has been changed
it was announced yesterday and the
meeting will be held 'Tuesday night
of next week. Hill auditorium has
been obtained for the occasion.
Speakers will be announced later,
with more details of the program. The
University band will be one of the
features that is expected to arouse a
great deal of spirit with the same
music that has stirred conventions in
many parts of the state. Besides a
series of cheers, which will be in ord-
er for the evening, Theodore Harrison
of the University School of Music, will
direct the singing and music.
Ralph Gault, '19, president of the
(Continued on Page Six)
Griffins Welcome
Q New Initiates
Griffiins, all-campus honorary so-
ciety, welcomed the following in their
spring initiation yesterday afternoon:
Nicholas Bartz, '20; Lawrence But-
ler, '21; Uri Carpenter, '20; Joseph
Baker, '20; J. P. Hart, '20; Peter Van
Boven, '20; Arthur Karpus, '21E; Rob-
ert Parks, '19E; and Gilbert Shafer,
'20E.
Following the initiation a banquet
was held at the Michigan Union at
which toasts were responded to by
Abraham Gornetzky, '19L; Gilbert
Shafer, '20E; Prof. I. Leo Sharfman,
Cedric Smith, '19E; Carl Johnson,
'20; and Prof. John R. Brumm. An-
gus Goetz, '22M, acted as toastmaster.

FIRST APPEARANCE OF
VARSITY GLEE CLUB
Many of Actors Well Known to Cam-
pus; Popular Songs and Music
Add Final Touch
All is in readiness for what will
perhaps be the most unique collection
of vaudeville acts Ann Arbor has ever
seen - "The All-Nation Hullabaloo,"
which the Cosmopolitan club is pre-
senting at 8 o'clock Friday night in
Hill auditorium.
The program will be opened with
Frenzied Fingers" by a real Hawai-
ian string sextette composed of J. L.
Bruno, Pedro del Valle, William del
Valle, P. Theron, G. Smit, and M.
Miller. Following this number, Nil-
kanth Chavre, Hindoo mystic, will give
an unusual) demonstration of mental
telepathy which he learned in India.
The Varsity Glee club has consent-
ed to appear on the program and the
campus will be given its first oppor-
tunity to enjoy the talent of the new
personnel.
"All-American Jazz";
No Michigan vaudeville is complete
without its Jazz and consequently
"Abe" Gornetzky, one of that art's
greatest exponents, will be on hand
with his "All-American Jazz" to furn-
ish "Syncopated Melodies." It is said
the act will carry some "Big Time"
features.
Max Jaslow has a dramatic sketch,
"The Vagabonds" and will be accom-
panied on the Frieze organ by Vernon
Johnson.
What he calls "Old Stuff" but what
will really be something ultra-mod-
ern, is, Knight Mirrielee's act as-
sisted by Gornetzky at the piano. Mir-
rielees will be remembered for his im-
mortal "Blue Book Blues" and "Come
On, Dad" numbers.
"The Spanish Bull Fight"
Clear the ring-here come the ban-
derilleros, picador, and matador to
appear before a Spanish official in the
national sport - bull fighting! Two
toros, or bulls, will be disposed of dur-
ing the evening.
"The Magic Flute" played by Knut
Jensen is described as an Indian in-
strument on which an Australian with
a Norwegian name plays Venetian
music.
Next on the program is Prof. H. Q.
Wong in experiments in "Chinese
Black Art," assisted by K. Wu and
N. H. Kwok. Wong has had broad ex-
perience in the field of mystery both
in America and in China. Carlos
(Continued on Page Six)

16 DROWN IN SINKING
Washington, May 1.-Two of-
ficers and 14 men of the crew of
the naval tug Gypsum Queen
were drowned when the ship
struck a rock and sank off the
Icoast of France on April 28.
while returning to Brest ater
assisting a fleet of mine sweep-
ers in distress. Three of the
sweepers foundered during a
severe storm. All members of
their crews and 17 officers and
men of the Gypsum Queen were
reicued by tugs and destroyers.
"NOS INTIMESP'" PLAYED
WITH GENUINE SUCCESS
UNIQUENESS OF PLOT BROUGHT
OJT BY CLEVERNESS OF
FRENCH STUDENTS
(J. I. Dakin)
"Our most intimate acquaintances
are not always our best friends." This
final speech struck the keynote of Vic-
torien Sardon's "Nos Intimes!" which
was presented Thursday evening in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall under the
auspices of the Cercle Francais.
It is the story of the trials and trib-
ulations of Monsieur Caussade, a
wealthy and open-hearted Parisian of
the middle class who gets into com-
plications because of the fact that he
is not careful enough in his choice of
friends. His wife, Cecile, is made
love to by one of his intimates who is
recovering from an illness at Caus-
sade's country home and a group of
meddlesome guests do their best to
make matters as bad as possible.
Caussade finally discovers that the
doctor, Tholosan, whom he disliked,
is a real friend. He gets rid of his
now unwelcome guests and the play
ends happily as a comedy should.
The acting was uniformly good.
Berenice Warsau, '22, who played the
part of Cecile, is worthy of especial
mention not only for her acting but
for her speech and accent. Lawrence
H. Seltzer, '20, A. J. Himmelhoch, '20,
A. W. Wilson, '21E, I. Victor Brock,
'19, Joseph Fredman, David A. Watts,
'21, and Norbert Lambert, '22, all were
In roles that required much stage pres-
ence and exceptional acting and they
filled thema in an unusually capable
manner.
Helen H. M. Roelofs, grad, as the
ingenue Benjamine, proved a delicate
foil for her dark-haired stepmother,
Cecile. Nora Wilson, '21, as Jenny, the
maid, and Marion Hayes, '19, as Ma-
dame Vigneux, played their parts well.
Between the acts, Marjorie West, '21,
sang three solos in French.
ORDERS BEING TAKEN BY CITY
FORESTER FOR SHRUBBERY
Orders will' be received by the city
forester's office during the next two
weeks for shrubs, hedges, and trees.
About three shipments have already
been received and more are on the
way. All the plants will be put in
as soon as they arrive by the corps
of men under Ray M. Bassett, forester
for the city of Ann Arbor.h
About 2,000 trees and shrubs were
sprayed during the last two weeks.
Next month during the blossoming
season the same trees and as many
more as possible will be sprayed.
U. S. GRANTS ITALY NEW LOAN
OF $50,0009000 TO PAY DEBTS

CHICAGO DEAN SAYS HE WAS
MISQUOTED ON ATHLETId MAT.
TERS
DECISION TO BE GIVEN
OUT TO PUBLIC SOON
(T. F. X.)
No action was taken upon the mat-
ter of the presidency of the Univer-
sity at the first May meeting of the
Board of Regents Thursday. Coming
from Galesburg, Ill., where he had
attended and addressed a meeting of
college heads the day before, Dean
James Rowland Angell, of the Uni-
versity of Chicago, arrived in Ann Ar-
bor in the morning, and after appear-
ing before the session of the board,
left for Chicago early in the after-
noon. It was the first campus meet-
ing of the Regents that Dean Angell
has attended since the presidency was
offered him two months ago.
Announcement to Come Soon
It was stated after the adjournment
of the session that the definite an-
nouncement regarding the result of
the past month's consideration and
negotiation of the question, would be
given out by President Harry B.
Hutchins within a short time.
When seen after the discussion with
the members of the board, Dean An-
gell appeared in his usual good humor,,
and being asked concerning a reput-
ed outline of his address at Galesburg
on collegiate athletics, as published by
one of yesterday's Chicago papers,
said that he had been persistently mis-
quoted throughout the entire artcle.
Approves of Sport
In regard to the intercollegiate
system of sports, Dean Angell replied
no one but a crazy man would favor
the abolition of intercollegiate athlet-
ics. He said it with a sparkle in his
eye, for it will be remembered that
during his four years in college at
Michigan, he held the University sin-
gles tennis championship, and during
the last two years was a memb'er of an
unbeatable Varsity tennis doubles
team. No further statement was made
concerning the situation.
After the meeting the members of
the board, with President Harry B.
Hutchins and Secretary Shirley Smith,
made a visit to the University hospi-
tals, and considered suggested loca-
tions for the site of the new hospi-
tal, the funds for which were appro-
priated by the present legislature. The
Regents adjourned until May 23.
FROSH PLAN JAZZ
MUSIC AT FROLIC
"Jazz, and lots of it!" will be the
slogan adopted by the Ponchartrain
orchestra at the 1919 Frosh Frolic on
May 16 in Barbour gymnasium.
All the variations of the trombone,
saxophone, violin, traps, and piano
will make the event a gala occasion.
Barbour gymnasium will be the scene
of the festivities, due to the fact that
the guest accommodations are larger
and additional features can be pro-
vided. Two hundred tickets will go
on sale Friday afternoon in U-hall
from 1:30 to 3 o'clock.
The ball room will be decorated in
green and white, with tints blending
with the general color scheme. Addi-
tional features are now being arrang-
ed by the social committee, who will
make public their decision later in
the week.
ENVOYS GIVE CREDENTIALS
IVarsailles, May 1.-In a ses-.
Ision beginning at 3:10 o'clock'
this afternoon and lasting barely
five minutes the German pleni-
potentiaries to the peace con-

STAG DINNER, Tonight p. n
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
BRUMM and PARKER will speak
For any men who want to come (Phone Reserbations to 2573)

Washington, May 1. - Italy has
been given a new loan of $50,000,000
by the treasury to cover a number of
obligations incurred by the Italian gov-
ernment on contracts for war mate-
rials and food stuffs from American
producers. The credit extension brings
Italy's total borrowings from the Unit-

gress presented tneir credent-
ials.
It was the first step in the
peace negotiations. The German
credentials were presented to
representatives of the Allies and
the United States.

Soc a plate

Over by 7:45

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" - t LU ei O+ ,. , .1 171 Uflfl (IIXA.
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TONIGHI
8:00 p. m.
35 cents

All Set for Tonight's
Big Show in Hill Auditorium
Old Favorites and New Stars toig Acts
All Nation Hullabaloo

Tickets from
Wahr's, Slater's
Sheehen's anld
at Box office

U

k ..:: -

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