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April 30, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-30

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THE WEATHER i IjT&-' ' ASSOCIATED
PROBABLY RAIN '~ PRESS
TOD~ ~i~d' ADAY AND NIGHT WIRE
W SERICE
VOL. XXIX. No. 146. ANN ARBOR, ICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

t

PRESENT RUSSIAN
CONDITION DUE TOU
MASS ILLITERACY

80 PER CENT OF PEOPLE
ILLITERATE AND
HELPLESS

AREI

DR. EGBERT SPOKE ON
HUN MENACE IN RUSSIA
Germ an Exptltdon to Be Feared If
World Looks Other
Way

CAMPUS THEATRE NEC
PROPER EDUCATI(
(T. F. M.)
For many years there has been a
rather feeble campaign carried on by
a few enthusiastic devotees to augment
the literary curriculum in order to in-
clude courses in dramatic composi-
tion, writing, criticism, and the study
of the mechanics of play presentation;
Discussion for the most part has been
confined to the artistic sanctuaries of
its protagonists, and little has been
publicly done or said in its regard, ex-
cept about opera time, when the mat-
ter has been given a scant, transient
bit of consideration.
Nevertheless, the need remains, and
with the growth of the University, and
the variety of new studies introduced,
the importance of such a subject has
increased. Perhaps the most difficult
phase of the question is concerned
with the specific methods to be used
in attaining the end in view.
Campus Stage Needed'
Speaking on the subject, Prof. Thom-
as E. Rankin, who has carried on the'
work to a necessarily limited degree,
in summer schools at the University,
remarks that what this community

(By A. W. Brown),
"The cause of the present conditions
of anarchy and bolshevism in Russia
may be attributed to the illiterate con.
dition of the masses," said, in effect
Mme. Breshkovsky, last night in he
address in Hill auditorium upon the
subject, "Reclaiming Russia."
Untold Possibilities
"If you could but know my people
as I know them, you would see what
children they are: good children, with
untold possibilities, undeveloped ca.
pacities; industrious, bright, devoted,
fearless children; but children in the
dark; easily misled because of their
ignorance.
"As I travel through your wonder-
ful America and see so many beauti-
ful schools and universities, so many
lleautiful public edifices, so many hap-
py people, I cannot but rejoice; but
at the same time I must grieve for
thinking of the pitiaby contrasted
conditions in my poor, torn country.
Great Contrast
"You have so much of comfort, you
are so strong and happy. You are
thinking people, for you are educat-
ed'; you may satisfy the greatest hu-
man longing; the longing to create, to
do something admirable, praiseworthy;
the longing to develop and diffuse your
innate capacities; but my people -
they can but drudge, they have never
been allowed to think, to expand, to
give themselves self-expression. Not
less than 80 per cent of all my peo-
ple are illiterates. That is, after all,
the greatest tragedy.
"And if I come to you with amy
message at all tonight, it is that you
must aid my country, my people, in
gaining that which they have never
had, opportunity for full development.
"We need educators, business men,
all that machinery which will furnish
a foundation for the economic and ed-
ucational future of Russia."
Dr. Egbert Speaks
Dr. Edward H. Egbert, who preceded
Mme. Breshkovsky with an address
upon the subject, "Reclaiming Rus-
sia," said:
"Russia's problem is the Russian
problem, and the Russian problem is
the world's problem, for Russia makes
up one-sixth of the total earth's area
and her population numbers 180,000,-
(Continued on* Page Six)
PUBL IC SPEAING WORK
WILL BE REORGANIZED
In order to get only those really
interested in campus oratorical work
in charge of all campus public speak-
ing affairs, a re-organization of the
University board in control of orator-
ical work is planned. The contem-
plated change in doing away with
class representatives on the oratorical
board and in their stead instituting a
board of about 20 men elected from
the student body.
The administration of campus or-
atorical work would thus be central-
ied, as it is planned to have each
member of the proposed board be a
chairman of a certain committee.
Among the 20 odd committees would
be ones such as lecture, social, intra-
mural debating, and finance commit-
tees.
No change in the membership of the
University Oratorical association is
contemplated, all students and facul-
ty still being eligible to membership.
The proposed plan has already met
the approval of the present oratorical
board. A meeting for general discus-
sion of the measure will be held next
week, and the final vote will be taken
at the campus elections held next
month.
TO RETURN CABLES MAY 2
{ Washington, April 29.-Post- fI
master-General Burleson issued
an order today returning the
American cable systems to their

owners, effective at midnight,
May 2. The postmaster-gener-I
al's order was issued at the di-
Irection of President Wilson. E

S
a
t,
r
e
e
It
h
e
r
Y
t
r
i
z
r

needs most
is an Art
cial feature
and stage

of all at the present time
Alliance building, a spe-
of which would be a hall
for the presentation of

MASS MEETING TO
OPEN CLASS GAMESi

Numerous Events to Take Time
Students May 11-18; Annual
Day Planned

of

CHANGE CAP NIGHT TO DAY
OF HIGH SCHOOL TRACK MEET
A giant mass meeting to inaugurate
the activities of Spring games week,
May 11 to 18, was planned by the Stu-
dent council Tuesday night for either
May 12 or 13. This type of get-to-
gether will probably resolve in the
annual holding of a Traditions' day.
Freshmen, sophomores, and all con-
cerned with under graduate events
will be kept busy during that week
with a sophomore meeting, a fresh-
man meeting, the numerous events of
the games, and now an All-campus pep
meeting wherein the wishes of alumni
and returned students will be realized
by an en masse exhibition of Michigan,
spirit.
The date of Cap night was changed
from May 29 to May 23 by the council
because a number of men will be in
town then for the Interscholastic track
and field meet and a larger crowd of
visitors will be able to attend. C. E.
Bottum, '20, was appointed chairman
of Cap night.
A motion was passed by the coun-
cil to the effect that there be not more
than three nominations for the same
office at the All-campus election.
WAR POSTERS HELP
FRENCH TO VICTORY
"Everyone in France, even the
schoolchildren were mobilized," said
Prof. Philip E. Bursley of the French
department during his lecture Tues-
day afternoon in Alumni Memorial
hall on his collection of French war,
posters. "The children up to 16
years of age were encouraged to en-
ter contests for the best posters that
they could draw or paint." In this
way the artists of the country were
aided in their efforts to convince the
people of the necessity of purchasing
war loans and to keep the hatred
against the boche at boiling heat.
Noticably striking among the 150
posters in the collection were those
issued by the league aginst renewing
relations with the Germans. The
dastardness and cruelty of the enemy
were flaunted in bright colors and
boldly called to the attention of all
li large type.
Small posters of the children and
the masterpieces of the artists, ac-
cording to Professor Bursley, paved
the way for each of the four French
war loans and a new set now plac-
ard the buildings of Paris for the
pres nt loan, which greatly resembles
our ictory loan.
"Fr mn the very first day of the con-
flict in August, 1914," said Professor
Bursley, "the French have been think-
ing of Alscex Lorraine and many of
the pictures on the posters show char-
acters or scenes from these places."
The coming of the Americans to
France was depicted in a series of
four posters.
One of the posters used . for the
second loan was enscribed "We will
have them" and lately the catch word
is "We have them."

CESSARY TO GIVE
)N IN MODERN DRAMA
plays. He goes on to say: "This gen-
eration is extremely rich in its dra-
matic heritage from the past, and,
furthermore, within the memory of
even middle-aged men, there have been
a score or more og dramatists who to-
gether have written a hundred or
more of plays, which will never cease
to be read by lovers of literature."
But, it is observed, these plays are
not being produced in our theaters, and
the public is being robbed by the fail-
ure to produce them just as much as
the Elizabethan public would have
been robbed if the theatrical managers
of their day had failed to produce the
plays of Marlowe, Shakespeare, and
Ben Jonson. At present the theater is
a business; but drama is only an art.
Depends on Native Ability
That is concerned with the apprecia-
tion and enjoyment of the drama. As
to the study and making of dramas,
it is a different matter. It is hardly
disputed that from the great number
of students in literary work very few
indeed could attain preeminence in
plays writing. It is a subject which
depends upon the native ability, nat-
ural taste, discrimination, imagination,f
And sense of values - in atword, the
genius of the student. 'In the actualt
teaching of the drama, little can be
done. For it is something so entirely2
a part of the writer, himself, that itf
cannot be taught.
In this regard, Professor Rankin isr
inclined to think that no undergrad-r
uate student should be permitted toi
enter a course in dramatic writing inv
a college unless he has already shown1
strong authorial ability of some sort.
The most successful of all American
playwrights once said that he neverc
spent less than two entire years up-i
on any one of his plays. That an un-t
dergraduate studyent can create a
drama within the course of one semes-
ter, is a matter which Professor Ran-
kin doubts, and, in general, he be-
lieves dramtic writing should be con-
fined to graduates.i
Many Can Write
However, there are many studentsn
who have the ability to write plays,
and who, because of circumstances,a
are unable to realize their possibili-
ties. For them, teaching drama is not
necessary. To study mere stage ef-n
fects, to secure instruction in the me-c
chanical details of presentation, to bea
taught the basic rules of dramatic ac-b
tion would suffice those who have the n
special talent. Stage driection is a'
thing that can be taught, and the prin- b
ciples and framework of the drama t
are as susceptible of study, as gram- b
mar or bridge building. C.
At Harvard and Vassar much has u
been accomplished working in this, di-
rection. Of necessity, the methods em- n
ployed are those of the laboratory. a
"The Work Shop" is the name of the s
class, that carries on these experi- c
ments, and an important feature of the o
system is the study of the mechanical P
elements that make a paly. C
Members Would Be Interested i
Such a course could be pursued at C
e
vichigan. Many student writers, prize$
sssay and poem competitors, members
f student publications, and independ- s
nt college quillmen would be deeply
nterested in such convenient facilities b
for this study. Undoubtedly, in time, S
ome playwrights, even great ones,
ould be produced. The enthusiasm isJ
present; we have able men to guide
Lid assist in the instruction. There is
nly one element lacking, and for
Yichigan it is now the most important
Alement -- we have no suitable labor-
itory.
The solution is a campus theater at d
;he University. t
n
PONTIAC CLUB TO BOOST a
MICHIGAN IN HOME TOWN7
S
Boosting the University in Pontiac t

YANKS IN RUSSIA 0. K.

W ashington, April 29.-Brig-
adier General Richardson, com-
mander of the American forces
in Northern Russia, in an official
reportto the war department to-
day, said he had visited all the
detachments in the Archangel
region and had found the health
and spirits of the men good.
There was no apprehension at
headquarters, he said, respect-
ing the morale of the American
forces.
IL L
PRESIDENT HUTCHINS
ENDORSESHULLABALOO
PROCEEDS OF ENTERTAINMENT
TO SUPPORT FIELD SEC.
RETARY
"My attention has been called to the
fact that an entertainment under the
auspices of the Cosmopolitan club of
the University of Michigan is to be
given in Hill auditorium, Friday, May
2, 1919, at 8 o'clock. I am glad to
give my approval of this entertain-
ment, for the Cosmopolitan club is a
most useful organization and the ob-
ject of the entertainment is a most
worthy one. I trust that the club will
be favored with a large audience. A
generous portion of the money re-
ceived is to be used toward maintain-
ing an European traveling secretary
to promote the cosmopolitan spirit
among the colleges and universities
in Europe.
(Signed) HARRY B. HUTCHINS,
President."
The foregoing endorsement by Pres-
dent Harry B. Hutchins 'of "The All-
Nation Hullabaloo," which the Cos-
mopolitan club is presenting Friday
night in Hill auditorium, should do
much to fill the building with a cap-
acity audience.
The Corda Frates association of Cos-
mopolitan clubs of which the local
qlub is a member, held a convention
at the University of Chicago, Decem-
ber 26-28, 1918, at which the following
resolution was passed: "Be it resolv-
ed that one or more representatives
be sent by the national association
o Europe to spread cosmopolitanism
by establishing and rehabilitating
chapters in European colleges and
universities."
The expense of the delegation will
necessitate a fund of some four thous-
and dollars to be raised by individual
ubscriptions, contributions from the
hapters and by donations. The board
f trustees for this fund consists of
Prof. J. R. Angell of the University of
Chicago; Mr. J. J. Arnold, vice-pres-
dent of the Frst National bank, Chi-;
ago; and Prof. E. W. Burgess, form-;
r president of the association. About
1,000 of the fund has already been,
ubscribed.
Tickets for "The All-Nation Hulla-
aloo" are now on sale at Wahr's,
later's, and Sheehan's book stores.4
Economics Smoker
To Draw Crowd
Affairs of interest to the economic
epartment and of economic Impor-
ance will be discussed at the All-Eco-I
omics smoker to be given under the
uspices lof the Commerce club at
:45 o'clock in the Michigan Union.]
Profs. Robert W. Wenley and I. Leof
harfman will speak. It was plannedI
o have Prof. Henry C. Adams talk,
ut he is unble to appear because of
llness. Another speaker will be ob-.f
ained to take his" place.
Music played by men of the eco-I
oomics department will be an addedI
eature of the evening. Smokes willI
>e provided for all who pay the 25
ient admission charge.c

I.

AERO CLUB DINNER
FOR RICKENBACKER
Capt. EddieRickenbacker, Ameri-
ca's best in aviation, will be royally
entertained Saturday evening at a
dinner given at the Union at 6 o'clock
under the auspices of the University
of Michigan Aero club. There will be
only 500 tickets saold and these are
expected to go very quickly. Union
members, only, will be able to buy
tickets at a dollar a plate either at the
Union or from members of the Aero
club.
George Ohrstrom, '19L, a friend of
Captain Rickenbacker, and Donald
Springer, '19E, president of the Union,
have been very active in arranging the
details and they predict an unusually
interesting evening. Wilfred V. Cas-
grain, who was with Captain Ricken-
backer at the front, will act as toast-
master.
Members of the Aero club are re-
quested to be present at the meeting
at 7 o'clock in the Union. -
TEHNIU, SARDOU'S
MAIN' CHARCTERISTIC
INTRICATELY CONCEIVED PLOT
CAUSES DIFFICULTY IN
CUTTING
Unusual skill in the technique of
playwrighting is considered to be the
outstanding characteristic of Victorien
Sardou, whose work, "Nos Intimes," is
to be presented under the auspices of
the Cercle Francais at 8 o'clock
Thursday evening in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall. Sardou is a clever rather
than a great dramatist.
Cutting Diffcutl
In "Nos Intimes" every speech and
each bit of action so depend on some
previous action or speech, and the
whole plot is so carefully woven that
the process of shortening the produc-
tion by cutting was exceedingly diffi-
cult. Sardou exhibits in this play the
keen sense of dramatic values for
which he is noted.
Sardou was constantly on the alert
in his daily life for material that he
could use in his plays. When he met
an interesting person, when he heard
a clever conversation, saw a new scen-
ic effect, or ran across a pretty girl,
he considered each for its dramatic
possibilities, and if he thought what
he observed worthwhile, he laid it
away in his mind for future reference.
Three Hour Performance
As the performance will take up
about three hours with intermissions,
it is especially requested by Mr.
Hackes, the director, that the audi-
ence be prompt in their attendance.
The curtain will rise sharply at 8
o'clock, Thursday evening.
Tickets for the presentation will be
on sale from 4 to 6 o'clock Wednesday
in Wahr's book store and will also be
sold at the door. The prices are 50
and 75 cents and $1.
MAY 16 DATE SET FOR FRESH
FROLIC AT BARBOUR GYM
May 16 is the date set for the Frolic
of the Fresh literary class which will
be held in Barbour gymnasium be-
cause of its appropriateness. Practi-
cally all arrangements have been com-
pleted for the annual dance of the
freshmen, whose attendance this year
is limited to 200.
A meeting of the freshman literary
class is to be held at 4 o'clock thisj
afternoon, at which time it will be de-
cided whether the Frolic will be sum-
mer formal, white flannel trousers and
blue coat, or informal. Tickets will
be placed on sale at this meeting.
Promotion of class spirit for thej
coming spring games and athletic ac-
tivities is another purpose of the meet-
ing. A baseball manager will proba-
bly be elected.j
INCLEMENT WEATHER HOLDS
BACK TRANS-OCEAN FLIERS
-f

I

ORLANDO NOT TO' RETURN TO PARIS
FOR TREATY-SIGNING; CONFRONTED
i BY SERIOUS DILEMMA IN ITALY

AMBASSADOR PAGE GETS EXPRES-
SION FROM MINISTER IN
INTERVIEW
COMPLICATIONS GROW
AS PACT IS COMPLETED
Allies May Sign Document Alone if
Rome Maintains Recalcitrant
Attitude
(By Associated Press)
Paris, April 29. - Ambassador Page
telegraphed from Rometoday that he
had gathered from Premier Orlando
in a long conference Monday that the
premier did not intend to return to
Paris for the signing of the treaty.
The premier expressed regret that the
time was so short before the arrival
of the Germans.
This was only one of the disturb-
ing complications presented by the
Italian situation as the time approach-
es for the delivery of the treaty to
Germany. Should Premier Orlando
not return for the signing of the treaty
it would give the situation a more
serious aspect than the departure of
the Italian delegation, as the Allies
would be required to take final action
without the participation of Italy.
While there is every desire to avoid
this result, the indications are that the
Allies will proceed with the signing
if Italy decides to withhold participa-
tion.
Orlando's Dilemma
The Italian premier, Ambassador
Page said felt that his action either
way would have serious consequences;
but it was preferable to have trouble
from without rather than from within
Italy, because the present state of
public feeling there would not justify
the signing of the treaty which did
not include Italian aspirations.
Ambassador Page said he had taken
steps to have the Italian authori-
ties suppress manifestations directed
against President Wilson.
Final Draft Complete
The final draft of the treaty is vir-
tually completed. The men in charge
of the work say they have no doubt
they will be able to finish their work
by Thursday or such time as delivery
is made.
The treaty consists of about 80,000
words. An official summary has been
compiled and will be made public
(Continued on Page Six)
NEW Y. W,. C A1 CABINET
MEMBERS ANNOUNCEO
Installation of the new Y. W. C. A.
cabinet will be held at Y. W. C. A.
vesper services at 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon in Barbour gymnasium. Miss
Constance Ball, Y. W. C. A. secretary
in charge of the state universities of
Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, and In-
diana, will discuss Y. W. C. A. work
as a vocation.
Reception for Miss Ball
After vesper services a reception
will be held in honor of Miss Ball.
Miss Amanda Nelson, secretary on
the national board of the Y. W. C. A.,
and Miss Ball were guests of honor
at a reception held yesterday after-
non by the University Y. W. C. A. at
the home of Mrs. A. E. Jennings on
Geddes avenue.
Both Miss Nelson and Miss Ball gave
short talks on opportunities for uni-
versity women in this work. lone
Wilbur, of the School of Music, sang
several selections.
Members Announced
Cabinet members as announced yes-
terday by Katherine Loveland, '20,
president of the Y. W. C. A., are as
follows: officers, president, Katherine
DeVries, '21; secretary Desdemona
Watts, '22; treasurer, Beatrice Beck-
with, '21; committee chairmen: re-
ligious education classes, Elizabeth.
Burgess, '20; vespers, Ruth Jennings,
'20; membership, Kathryn Glass, '20;
social service, Flora Bel Ellis, '20;
social, Ann Noble, '20; publicity, Alice
Comlossy, '21; international, Margaret

Rothschaefer, '21; intercollegiate,
Frances Wesley, '20; conference and
conventions, Rose Sturmer, '20; music,
Katherine Farrah, School -o Music.

i_

by inviting the senior class of the
high school to the spring games, will
be the first achievement of the Pontiac
club, composed of Pontiac high school
graduates, formed Tuesday night at
Lane .hall. A banquet will be given
for the future University students at
the time of their visit.

ALL SEATS RESERVED
THE CERCLE FRANCAIS PRESENTS
"NOB INTIMES"
MODERN FRENCH COMEDY
Thursday, May 1, 8 P. M.
SARAH CASWELL ANGELL HALL
Easily Understood - Interesting Plot
Humor - Action
Tickets at Wahr's 50e, 75c, $1.00 with rebate
of 50c to associate members

St. Johns, Newfoundland, April 29.--
With another sudden change to bad I
weather the start of the transatlantic1
flight of Harry Hawker, Australian,
and Capt. Frederick P. Raynham, his1
British rival, has been postponed from
two days to a fortnight, when the full
moon may bring hoped for flying con-
ditions. The most optimistic predic-
tions call for at least 48 hours' con-
tinuation of present conditions and
though both flyers and crews held
themselves in readiness for a hop-off
during the early morning byamidaft -
ernoon all hope for an immediate
shift in the wind was abandoned and

Sophomc
outs for a
for the Gb
are wanted
ager, Char
between 3;
iday after
Ibuilding.

ore and freshman try-
ssistant managerships
ee And Mandolin clubs'
d. Apply to the man-
rles R. Osius, Jr., '20,
and 4 o'clock Wednes-
noon room 1, Press

the hangars were deserted.

i

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