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April 19, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-19

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THE WEATHER
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY
WARNER

r Sitr tian

~Iatjl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

I-

I

VOL. XXIX. No. 137. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SATURDAY, APRIL 19, 1919. PRICE THREE CENlTS

f

PERSHIING EXHORTS
TROOPSIN hUSSIA
TO EEP UP1VALOR
AMERICANS ASSURED OF MORAL
SUPPORT OF COMRADES
Il FRANCE
NEW YORK COMMANDER
ARRIVES IN ARCHANGEL
Brig.-Gen. Wilde P. Richarison Takes
Charge of Forces In
East
(By Associated Press)
Archangel, April 17 (delayed). -
Brig.-Gen. Wilde P. Richardson, U. S.
A., arrived at Archangel today with
his staff on board the first big ice
breaker which has made its way into
the regular Archangel docks since
winter. One of the first'acts of Gen-
eral Richardson, who comes to the
pommand of the American forces in
North Russia, was to make public to
the American troops a telegram from
General Pershing calling on them to
maintain the morale.
General Pershing's Message
General Pershing's message was as
follows: "Inform your troops that all
America resounds with the praise of
the splendid record the American ex-
peditionary forces have made. The
reputation of the American soldier for
valor and his splendid discipline un-
der the most trying donditions have
endeared severy member of the exie-
ditionary forces not only to his
friends and relations but to all Amer-
ieans."
Praise of Ameran People
"Their comrades in France have not
forgotten that the Americans in North
Russia are part of the expeditionary
forces and we are proud to transmit to
you the generous praise of the Amen-
can people. I feel sureevery soldier
in North Russia will join his com-
rades here in the re olution that o
will return to America with unblem-t
ished reputation.
Plans for Relief
"I wish every soldier in Northern
Russia tohknow that I fully appreciate
that "his hardships have continued long
after those endured by our soldiers
in Prance, and every plan has been
made to relieve conditions at the ear-
liest possible moment,"
Red Cross Drive
ushes To Close
Discarded clothing for the Euro-
pean war sufferers came into the Red
Cross rooms on Williams street Fri-
day *ith a rush.
Local people have not come up to
the expectations o, the Red Cross
workers as yet, and with the closing
hour set at 5 o'clock Saturday, it will
be necessary for those who have the
real American spirit to get busy and
collect their cast-off colthes.
The clothes will be collected if de-
sired but as the local workers are
having some trouble in getting ma-
chines with which to gather up the do-
nations, it is asked that they be
brought to the headquarters by the
donor if possible.
Those in charge say that if the peo-
ple could only realize the condition of
the siffering people in the war strick-
en countries they would give clothes
that seem necessary.
SUNRISE SERVICE PLANNED
BY CIRURCH; CLUBS TO SING

A sunrise service on Easter morning
under the auspices of the Congrega-
tional Church school has been arrang-
ed to take place at 6:16 o'clock at the
first bend of the Boulevard from the
Geddes avenue entrance.
Music particularly significant of the
occasion will be given by the Univer-
sity Girls Glee club and the Fresh-
man Girls' Glee club of Martha Cook
dormitory. A ive-minute address will
he given by Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas.
The service will begin promptly at
the specified time and will not be pro-
longed beyond 20 minutes. The serv-
ice will not occur in case of storm.-

NEW WATER METER
SYSTEM ASSURED
Useless waste in the use of the
Steere Farm water supply is to be
eliminated by the installation of new
water meters. It has been found by
actual experiment that putting meters
in the homes of a city has cut down
the amount of water used by 30 per
cent.
Seventy-five thousand dollars has
been appropriated by the city for the
purchase and installing of these met-
ers. The work will begin as soon as
they can be secured. The appropria-
tion bill passed after a bitter fight,
and the necessary three-fifths major-
ity was obtained by only four votes.
It is expected that this change in
the city water system will save many
thousands of gallons of water an-
nually.
Geneva Ameeino
S et For Jane 13
June 13 has been set as the open-
ing date for this year's student con-
ference to be held at Lake Geneva,
Wis. This conference, which will last
until June 22, will be attended by stu-
dents from all colleges in the middle,
west.
Forty from Micehigan
All schools and colleges have been
urged by officials to send their repre-
sentative leaders in all lines. Each
100 enrolled entitles the college to one
representative, Michigan's quota being
about 40.
With the avowed purpose of training
men for world Christian leadership,
the conference will be addressed by
men who rank among the leaders of
that type today. Bishops T. Nichol-
son and W. F. McDowell, Dr. J. T.
Stone, Dr. J. C. White, and the Rev.
C. W. Gilkey have been secured as
speakers.
Will Entertain Foreigners-
To promote a more friendly feeling
between American and foreigner, of-
ficials of the conference have offered
to entertain as guests any foreign stu-
dents with the exception of those from
Canada, the British Isles, and the
Scaninavian countries.
Any who ii'ay be interested in at-
tending this conference are asked to
consult with Mr. N. C. Fetter at Lane
hall within the next two weeks.
ENGINEERS GIVEN
UNUSUAL OFFERS
Junior and senior engineers were
given the opportunity of interviewing
and submitting applications for posi-
tions to Mr. G. H. Pfeif, head of the
educational system of the General
Electric company, Friday afternoon,
in the FEngineering building.
Due to the fact that students from
practically every engineering school
in the country are engaged in the
summer work with this company an
unusual opportunity is available to
under-graduates to learn what other
schools are doing in their line of
work. No limit as to the number of
men accepted, it will depend entirely
on the number of qualified applicants.
In commenting on conditions in the
electrical industry at the -present
time, Mr. Pfeif stated that while this
line of work, like all others, was in
an unsettled condition due to cancell-
ing of war contracts, the outlook for.
the future was exceptionally good.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
RATIFIES CHANGES
Amendments to the constitution of
the Women's league, incorporating
automatic league membership and
placing the league elections on the
general campus election day, the day
to be set by the Student council, were
adopted at a meeting of the league
in Barbour gymnasium Friday after-

noon.
Revisions in wording comprised the
majority of the changes. Reports of
officers and committees were also
read.
WORKERS' STRIKE IN BREMEN
DELAYS AMERICAN FOOD SHIPS
Berne, April 18.- A dispatch sent
from Bremen by the German semi-of-
ficial Wolff bureau says that owing
to a strike of dock workers in that
city it has been impossible to unload
food brought on American steamships.
Another telegram from Bremen saysJ
that the labor leaders announced that;
a general strike had been declared
there

Aviator Leaves England In
Attempt To Cross Atlantic

MASS MEETING LIGHTS MATCH TO
VICTORY LIBERTY LOAN CAMPAIGN1
SOLDIER AS MODEL fOCILAN

Eastchurch, England, April 18. -
Major J. C. P. Wood left Eastchurch
at 3:15 o'clock this afternoon in a
Short airplane for Limerick, Ireland,
on the first leg of his attempt to cross
the Atlantic.
Major Wood started his flight in
ideal weather. There was very little
wind. He was accompanied by Lan-
caster Patter, a test pilot for the
Short company.
Adverse weather conditions in St.

Johns, N. F., prevented the start of
Harry B. Hawker, Australian pilot,
and Capt. Frederick P. Raynham,
'British aviator, his rival, in their at-
tempted flight from this continent to
England. A six inch snow fall and a
driving gale made flying impossible in
the early afternoon.
Ioth aviators, suspicious of a se-
Ocret start on the part of the other,
were plainly restive under the forced
delay.

EXTENSIVE STRIKE
IMMINENT IN N. Y
Trade Unionists Threaten Sympathetic
Walkout with Harbor
Workers
MAYOR HYLAN PRESIDES AT
ARBITRATION CONFERENCE
(By Associated Press)
New York, April 18. - A strike of
all the trade unionists in the bur-
roughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn
was threatened late today unless pri-
vate boat owners make "reasonable
concessions" to their men in an effort
to end the strike of the Marine Work-
ers affiliation.
The declaration that a strike was
iminent was made by Edward I. Han-
nab, president of the central federated
union which includes all the trades in,
Manhattan, after a conference at the:
city hall presided over by Mayor Hy-
lan, at which the armistice granted
by the' harbor workers was extended
another 24 hours.
Truce Prolonged
The truce was prolonged to give the
mayor opportunity to confer with pri-
vate owners regarding acceptance of
an arbitration offer made by their em-
ployers.
May Call Conference
Mr. Hannah asserted that, unless the
boat owners promptly showed a dU-
position to meet their workers' de-,
mand, he would call a joint conference
of the governing boards of the' en-
tral Federated union, the Brooklyn
Central Labor urion, and the rtfte
Hebrew Trades to consider systematic
strike action. Such a walkout would
involve hundreds of thousands of
workers.
Love Mlust Reign
Else World's Lost
"Christ knew that it would be the
figure of a bleeding hero upon a cross,
dying to prove his belief in his theory]
that love must reign in the world else
the world cannot survive, that would
stir the imagination and embolden the]
faith of worthy humanity to the end
of time," declared Lloyd C. Douglas
in the special Good Friday service
held Friday afternoon in the Congre-
gational church.
"%ove Supreme Over Law"
"Christ saw that there would be
ages of awful persecution for the mi-
nority who tried to reproduce the prin-
ciple in their lives that love is su-
preme over law. He saw that unless
men adopted this rule of life they
would perish. In the light of recent
4alamities, we can easily see how this
could be true. Indeed, with the world's
uncleared tragedy still before our
eyes, we can hardly understand how it
could be otherwise than true if civ-
ilization continues to hate and vent its
hate through increasingly powerful
weapons of destruction.
Must Look to Cross
"But Christ's great spirit knows that
uplifted, He will draw all men, event-
nally, unto him. For, after the world
has suffered until its heart can suf-
fer no more, and has tried every ex-
periment to save its life but His sim-
ple rule, 'Thou shalt love thy neigh-
bor as thyself,' it will turn its weary
footsteps toward that ugly, bloody,
wooden post, with the transverse bar.
It is for us to help conserve the mag-
netie. power of the cross, until His
reign of love shall have achieved uni-
versal empire."
LIST OF NEW LIBRARY BOOKS
NOW AVAILABLE TO PUBLIC
New books at the Library are listed
in a pamphlet which may be obtained
at the circulation desk in the main
reading rom.
The list includes a synopsis of the
latest works of importance along the

line of fiction, history, politics, relig-
ion, and subjects of a popular nature.
The University Library tries to get the
best and latest works of the above'
nature to be had, and any person in-
terested In Important topics of the
day will find there a large variety ofJ
material to choose from.

CAMPUS DIRECTORS
FOR LOAN N.MED
Prominent University Students Placed
on Committees by County War
- Board
PLANS FOR SEPARATE CAM.
PAIGN DECIDED THIS MORNING
Two committees have been named
by the Washtenaw county war board
to take care of the Fifth Victory Lib-
erty loan in the University.
One is a faculty committee, com-
posed of Registrar Arthur G. Hall,
Robert A. Campbell, treasurer of the
University, Professor Louis A. Strauss
of the English department, and John
C. Christensen, assistant secretary,
which will supervise the work of the
student committee, but take no part in
the executive.
The student committee Is composed
ot some of the most prominent stu-
dents of the campus: Ralph E. Gault,
'19, general chairman; Don Springer,
'19, president of the Union; Doris Mc
Donald, '19, president of the Women's
league, and Clarence L. Roser, '19,
managaing editor of The Daily.
Details for a separate campaign in
the University will be adopted at a
meeting of both committees to be held
at 9 o'clock Saturday morning in the
registrar's office. Al details and the
question of the amount to be raised
will be settled at this time.
It is probable, however, that the
general scheme of the city campaign
will be used. The three "Victory Days"
on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday
of next week will be the time when
all voluntary subscriptions will be
taken at booths placed on the campus
at strategic points. These booths will
be known as "Victory Temples."
The results of the meeting Saturday
morning will be announced in Sun-
day morning's Daily. The committee
will desire that all volunteer in the
three volunteer days. A big prelim-
inary advertising campaign is being
waged so that the people may have
their minds made up as to how many
bonds they will buy.
BAND TO TAKE BIG
PART AT SAGINAW
Four meetings and two parades are
on the program for the Varsity band
within the next three days. At 7
o'clock this morning it left in its spe-
cial coach for Saginaw, where it will
arrive about 12.
Immediately it will leave the sta-
tion in its first parade to the Bancroft
House, where it will play at a meet-
ing of the district chairman. In the
evening another meeting of the chair-
men will be held at which the band
will again play, after participating in
a huge parade in the afternoon.
Sunday afternoon it will take part
in the largest parade and mass meet-
ing which will be held in the Sagi-
naw Auditorium. At this time Am-
bassador Gerard will talk and the
only other speaker on the program is
Prof. John R. Brumm of the rhetoric
department. He will also talk at the
two meetings Saturday.
On its return the band will drop
down to Monroe, where it will play at
its fourth and last meeting, and will
then arrive in Ann Arbor Monday
evening.
HEPPEARD, UE, VISITS CAMPUS
BEFORE TAKING UP NEW WORK
T. H. Heppeard, '18E, who has re-
cently been discharged from the serv-
ice as lieutenant of aviation, visited
the University Friday prior to his leav-
ing for Akron, Ohio, where he has ac-
cepted a position with the Goodyear

'Tire company.
County Supervisors to Meet Tuesday
A meeting of the Washtenaw county
supervisors will be held at 10:30
o'clock Tuesday morning in the epunty
building.

SEVEN GERMAN SUBS LOST
Cherbourg; April 18.- Seven
German submarines on the way
here' from England have been
lost in a storm. Eight of the
undersea boats were bound here.
but only one arrived safely.
Story Of Passion
Play To Be Read
Timely in their sentiments, selec-
tions from the Passion Play will be
given at 7:30 o'clock Easter Sunday
evening at the Methodist church by
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood. The Pas-
sion Play, which is given every 10
years by the residents of the little
village of Oberammergau, Germany,
portrays the life of Christ.
Witnesses Produtin in 1910.
During his tour around the world
in 1910 Professor Trueblood visited
the scenes in Palestine as depicted in
the play. He then went directly to
Oberammergau, where he witnessed a
production of the famous play.
Since his return Professor True-
blood has reecived many requests to
give readings from the play. This
will be the first time readings from
the drama itself will be given here,
since there are few ranslations from
the German origina in existence.
First Given in 164
The history of the play is 4nterest-
ing, the first performance being given
in 1634 and the last in 1910. "Whether
a performance will be given in 1920
is doubtful," said Professor True-
blood. "The present . civil war in
Germany may disrupt all such plans."
Since the play is of great length,
Professor Trueblood -will give only the
principal scenes with a running nar-
rative of the parts omitted.
Cast In French
Play Announced
Practically all of the elementary
French classes of the University are
studying at present a special edition
of Sardon's "Nos Intimes!" which the
French department has published es-
pecially for the presentation of the
play May 1, under the auspices of the
Cercle Francais.
In the front of the book is a cast
of characters. The play itself is con-
siderably shortened in order that it
may be adapted to suit the needs of
the present production. A special vo-
cabulary will be ready in a few days.
Alfred W. Wilson, 21E, Lawrence
H. Seltzer, and Victor Brock, '19, have
the principal men's parts. Bernice
Warsaw, '22, has the most important
woman's part. Marjorie I. West, '21,
bf the School of Music, is expected to
sing between the acts.
Rehearsals are being held daily un-
der the direction of Mr. Everett L.
Hackes, of the French department.
For the program he has prepared a
short synopsis of the play act by act.
Tickets will be on sale from 4 to .6
o'clock,. April 29, at Wahr's book
store. The prices are 50 and 75 cents,
and $1. Any money made on the per-
formance will go to a fund to pur-
chase -books for the Cerce Francais.
Mr. Hackes stated that the play will
last longer than that of last year. The
greater part of the action comes in
the second and third acts, although
there is also considerable movement in
the fourth.
GRANDMOTHER OF RUSSIAN
REVOLUTION TO SPEAI HERE
Madame Breshkowski, the "little
grandmother of the Russian revolu-
tion," will speak Tuesday evening,
April 29, in Hill auditorium upon the
subject, "Reclaiming Russia."
Madame Breshkowski has spent 35
years of her life in the prison camps
and mines of Siberia.
She is accompanied by Dr. Edward

H. Egbert, chief surgeon of the Amer-
ican Red Cross in Russia. Dr. Egbert
is to deliver an introductory address.
Director to Address Chicago Alumnae
Miss Grace Greenwood, director of
Martha Cook building, is attending the
annual convention of Michigan Alum-
nae in Chicago, where she will give an
address to the women.
Iowa Defeats Chicago 6.5
Iowa City, April 18. - Iowa opened
the Western conference baseball se-
ries today by defeating Chicago 6 to 5.

J. D. CLARK STIRS MEETING BY
GIVING YANK'S OUT.
LOOK
"THANKSGIVING DAY"
TO START NEXT WEEK
Details Explained by Local Lawyer;
Ypsilanti Singer and Band
Make Hit
(Byhornon ., Sarent,.
"We civilians must measure up to
that standard which the soldiers have
set for us," said J. Duncan Clark, of
the Chicago Post, in his talk last night
at the Hill auditorium mass meeting
for the Fifth Victory Liberty Loan.
"If not, they have served and died for
people who were not worthy of the
sacrifice.
Soldier As Model
"A soldier never says," he continued,
I have been in three or four fights,
so I won't get into this one.' A sold-
ier never says, 'I have been wounded
once, and although I am feeling all
right, I won't get in this battle.' He
never says, 'I do not like the adminis-
tration at Washington, so I won't fight
next time.'
"Why, then, should any civilian find
an excuse for not supporting the
Loan? This campaign will be a hard
one, but it gives us an opportunity to
show that we are not quitters.
"The people," concluded Mr. Clark,
"must stand shoulder to shoulder to
show that the masses are behind their
government."
Brings Down House......
Mr. Clark's stirring appeal brought
round after round of applause from
the audience. It was a fitting finale
to the series of speakers, the first of
whom was Mrs. James Morrison, of
Chicago, a prominent figure in. the
woman's world.
Her appeal called upon the people
to finish with a mighty effort. Soe'
illustrated this graphically by saying,
"A soldier does not get his hondorable
discharge until the war is over, an
cur duty is not done until this job is
done."
Band Starts Off Meeting
Mrs. Roscoe M. Bonisteel, an Ann
Arbor attorney, was called upon to ex-
plain the details for the drive in Ann
Arbor, and the features of the national
effort. H. W. Douglas presided over
the meeting. Carl Lindegreen, of the
Ypsilanti School of Music, was loudly
encored after his song of a blind
French soldier, who learned from his
little .son that the American soldiers
were passing in the street below. He
responded with the Marseillaise which
he sang in French.
After .parading through various
streets of the city the Varsity band
opened the meeting with "Victors,"
followed by the Star Spangled;Ban-
ner. The Mass meeting closed with
Earl Moore playing "America" on the
organ.
Three Volunteer Days
On Monday, Tuesday, and Wednes-
day of next week, "Thanksgiving
Days," the Fifth Victry Liberty Loan
will be placed on sale in Ann Arbor at
the "Victory Temple," next to the
National Bank building. Two kinds of
bonds are for sale, the four and three-
quarter percent bonds which are tax-
able, and the three and three-quarters'
percent bonds which are exempt from
all taxation except the estate and in-
heritance taxes.
These bonds are four year bonds,
which practically assurds their re-
maining at par all the time, this'means
that they may be readily converted in-
to cash. They may be paid for in in-
stallments, the final one of which
comes in November.
U. S. PROPAGANDA NOTES TO
GERMANY SENT TO LIBRARY
Capt. Donald Stone, a graduate of
the University and at present attached
to the headquarters of the American
army in France, has sent to the Uni-
versity Library copies of the propa-
ganda notes dropped by the American

aviators over Germany.
These notes include a record of the
military feats of the Allies and Amer-
ica, America's wonderful growth in
a military way, President Wilson's
speeches, exhortations to the German
army showing the futility of their
cause and urging them to revolt, and
other papers of a similar nature.
NEW ANN ARBOR COUNCIL TO
MEET FIRST TIME ONI AY
New Common Council of Ann Arbor
will hold its first meeting Monday
night at 7:30 p. m. Mr. George E.
Lewis is president of the council.

_

TECHNIC WANTS TRY-OUTS

'

Freshman or sophomore try-
outs for staff positions on the
Michigan Technic are wanted.
All those interested in this kind
of work should apply at the of-.
flee of the Technic in the Engi-
neering building.

PARKER AND MACK, GRADUATES
OF 1917, iERE ON SHORT STAY
Lieuts. J. C. B. Parker and Edward
E. Mack, both of the class of 1917, ar-
rived in Ann Arbor Friday, for a -few

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