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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 15, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, A

- ..W4. Im -

r ,

S3Iridtian ail
OFFICIAL N;WSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHGAN
Published every morning except Monday
luring the university year by the Board in
yunttrol of Student Publications. 7
V3EM i2R OF T huI ASSOCIATED PRESS]
The Associated Ires is exclusively entitled
Yo the use for reublicaion of all news dis-
patches credited to it or Pot otherwise credited
in this paer and also the local news pub-
' isbted herein.
lnered at the postotfice at Annri Arbor.
Wwbigan, as becnd class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $350.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, 96 ; ditorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 30* woids,
di signed, the sigatur not necessarily to ap-
tear in print, but as an evidence of faith, andi
gotce of events will be published in The
taily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
consideration. No manuscript will be re-
turned unless the writer incloses postage.
The I aily does nmt necessarily endorse the
sentinments expressed in the communications.
EDTORIAL STAFF
Clarence Roeser...........Managing Edito
I1 C. L. Jackson...............City Editor
llarry M. Carey...............News Editor
]truc Millar...........elegraph Edito
iton - -arx-...............Associate Editor
Thomas F. McAllister.......Feature Editor
>)avid B. Landis...............Sport ditor
-Marguerite Clark............Women's Edito;
Martha Guernsy...........Women's Editor
Kendrick Kimball.......Guillotine Editor
Charles R. Osius, Jr............. State Editor
Mark K. Ehbert............Eiciency Editor
Paul A. Shinkman.........Dramatic Editor
uth Dailey................Exchange Editor
ISSUE EDITORS '
hierbert R. Susser Paul G. Weber
Ivnaud Sherwood "Edgar L Rice
Willim nClarkson k. D. Flintermann
hIiIugh W. Hitchcock J. IP. fat
SR EORTERS
Marie Crozier Muriel E. Bauman
Edna Apel Eobrt E. Swart
Tomnas H. Adams John E. MegManis
Richard B. Marshall C. 11 Murchison
Irene Ellis Mary D. Lane
C. S. Baxter-
. - BUSINESS STAFF
Harold AMakinson.........Business Manager
Agnes L. Abele...Asst. Business Manager
LeGrand A. Gaines...Asst. Business Manager
Win. M. LeF re... .Asst. Business Manager
'Wi. A. Leitinger. Asst. Business Manager
ltouali M. Major...Asst. Business Manager
Donnel R. Schoiner..Asst. Business Manager
t. S E N ItJR STA VF 'J
Mlark 1.Covell Edward Pris, Jr.
ao lert i. McKean . enry Whiting 11
George A. Cadwell-
JUNIOR STAFF
Curt P. Schneider Isabelle Farnum
hlarold IP. Lindsay Duae Miller
layard A.Newton Geo. R. Strimbeck, Jr.
R. A. Sullivan.
T UESDAY APRIL 15, 1919.
Issue Editor- erbert R. Slusser
There will be a neeting of the et-
ir editorial staff at 5 o'clock Tuesday
afternoon I the reportoritl rooms.
AIPRTCIATON
The Daily announces with regret
the resignation of H. C. L. Jackson
from the post of city editor. He
leaves to accept a position on the new
government social seivice paper, "The
Azuwer," published by and in the in-
terests of the wounded soldiers of
Base HePsital No. 36, Detroit.
The hospital is one of the largest
of the government's reconstruction
bases, and the paper unique among
publications. It has already won re-
cognition and sucess wherever it has
appeared, and Jackson is to be con-
gratulated upn his new connections.
This has been the third year that
Jackson has worked on The Daily.
Returning from service at the begin-
ning of the present semester, he was
appointed city editor, with the task
of building up the reportorial staff.
The astonishing success he has had,
creating u4bounded enthusiasm and
spirit on The Daily, is a tribute both
to his administrative ability and to his
inspiring personality.
The Daily deplores his leaving, but

it is glad to find him appreciated by
the outside world, as he has long been
appreciated here. Success to him in
his new field!
TIlE HOME STRETCH
The race-horse always makes its
greatest efforts on the home stretch.
The baseball team takes on new life
toward the end of the game, and many
a contest has been won in the ninth
inning. The long-distance runner
never fails to make a spurt on the
last lap.
The home stretch; the ninth inning,
the last lap-is with us at present.
The second half of the second semester
is at hand, and the end o the year l-
most in sight. Are we g :ing to put
forth our greatest efforts, and make a
strong finish?
With spring upon us, and the beck-
oning of the great outdoors, it usally
happens that we slacken up in our
work. We think that the year is near-
ly over anyvay, so what is the use of
starting hard work at this stage of
the game? But the race is never won
by the laggard, nor the ball game by
the quitter.
Let's work all the harder just be-
cause there is not much left of the
school year. Let's resolve to make a
whirlwind finish. Let's all do our ut-
- -a n a an tAhm teh

The Guillotine

A Street Called State
'A buzz like the Tower of Babel,
Like the surge of a mighty wave;
Flashes of mink, seal and sable
Lighting the drab of the pave.,
Laughing and shouting and faiting,
And thudding the countless feet,
(Is it Monte Carlo he's painting?)
Nope...................State street.
A phantasmagoria graphic,
Eager and intent the trend;
A swift, labyrinthian traffic,
On and on without end.
Peoples of all creeds and races,
The well to do, poor, and elite,
(Is it one of those foreign places)
Nope..................State street.
--Chicago Examiner.
Of all the words of tongue or pen,
tIhe saddest are "to class again."
Shake Child and Place Him in Ice
Box
(Me Min's Food Directions)
"Before feedingthe baby shake well.
Keep in cool place."
Why the Proofreader Took Out
Another Policy
"Charles Smith has returned to his{
work in the saw mill after an abcess
of several weeks."
-Mercyville Iowa Banner.1

are among those writing from "over
there." An exchange of photographs
of interesting personages and places
is also being made.
Although the war can no longer be
used as an excuse for originality in
women's professions, occupational
theraupy has opened up a large field'
that is also comparatively novel. Not to
qualified knitters but to women quali-
fied' to teach to patients in military
hospitals academic, industrial and coin-
mercial work, is the call now being
made from the surgeon general's of-
flee in Washington.
Salaries, uniforms, and general liv-
ing conditions for women registering
as reconstAruction aides are similar to
those of military nurses. They must
be betw een the ages of 25 and 40
years.
Dean Myra B. Jordan is attempting
to organize a summer class for in-
struction in occupational theaupy ii
IDetroit and will furnish application
blanks and full information in regard
to this work. A similar course, be-
ginning April 28, will be offered at
the Henry B. Favill School of Occupa-
tiolal Theraupy in Chicago.
The girls in the first act of "Qual-
ity Street" will rehearse at 4 o'clock,
Tuesday afternoon, in Barbour gym-
nasium.
LOST? Advetise in The Daily.-Adv.

EMPLOYMENT FOUND
FOR MANY BY "Y"
Approximately $1000 was earned by
50 University students who were giv-
en jobs by the Y. M. C. A. employment
agency during the past spring vaca-
tion.
About 175 jobs consisting of all
kinds of work including waxing floors,
work on lawns and gardens, washing
windows, and beating rugs, were fill-
ed by the 50 men who did the work.
The average pay was 35 cents per
hour.
Many students went home, accord-
ing to G. G. Whitney, employment sec-
retary of the Y. M. C. A., because jobs
did not come in until after vacation
had stared and they thought that
there would be none and that it would
not pay them to remain in town for
the vacation. He also said, "Students
should not become discouraged as jobs
are not listed ahead of time. Unless
students do volunteer for jobs when
they do come in employers will Inud
fault with the service and will stop
listing positions. For this reason stu-
dents who want work can co-operate
a great deal by leaving their applica-
tions and the hours when they can
work with the employment secre-
tary."
There are still plenty of jobs for
students who wish to work during
their spare hours in the afternoon. All
wishing odd jobs of this sort should
apply to the employment secretary in
Lane hall between the hours of 8 and

Base fall argainsV,!

We are offering our stock of

Bae Ball Mittsan Gloves
at before-the-war prices, which means that you
can save from 25 to 50 % if you take
advantage of our offer.
COME EARLY

iiAI1 S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

ALWAYS ASK i

S
i
on ni

ICE CREAM'

Sure Symp~toms
When April trips along the path
flower spangled gown
And softly o'er the countrysidet
twilight settles down,
And in the dusk the robin sweet1
gins to gaily sing
We dream of Smock and hama
eggs 'cause then we know
spring.

Delicious and Refreshing

in

the
be-
and
it's

i

BANQUET RESERVATIONS

Mcregor Golf Clubs
Lee, Wright & Detson and Spaulding
Rackets

Overheard at Bill and Merts
First slap sticker-"How is your ap-
petite since the Hop?
Second slap sticker--"Bully. I have
been living on Steere farm water all
week."
First s.-"I don't mind this re-
stricted diet much. I have been liv-
ing on hash since the Hop and feel
like everything."
Since our greatest river is the Fa-
ther of Waters why don't they call it
the Mistersippi?
Divers Reasons
There was a young soldier from
Maine
Who walked, thru Paree in the rain
In crossing the river
He was hit by a flivver
Which tended to drive ,him in Seine.

Wdelta

Cafe

Tennis Balls

Rackets Restrung

GRAHAM, formerly Sheehan & Co.

EXCLUSIVELY DEVOTED TO BANQUET
AND DINNER DANCE SERVICE

9 o'clock in the morning and 1 and 2
In the afternoon.
Get your Daily subscription at once
and get the full benefit of the reduc-
ed price.-$1.00.-Adv.

'I

PHONE 805

N. E. KONOLD

_

- ,
--
_-- ®
z d'

r

Ann Arbor taxi's
proper thing, flaunt
every cylinder that
tion.

should, as the
a gold star for
has died in ac-

df oa

I

I I

.. .. Our Daily hrdi rdi oi nnnn
Ohr ]Daily Novelette
The girl -(looking at the Orientall
summer home)-"Don't you just love
pagodas?"
Frosh-"Naw! Give me the old
fashioned nightgown."
"Diamond Match Factory Burns."
-Joliet, Ill.,Herald.
There was probably some friction
between the heads of the departments.
Punctuated Poeom s No. 5
A big Northern Spy hit 'Eve in the
eye
As she talked, to the snake in the
dark,
Tho' her orb grew black her speech
didn't slack
As it was a quotation mark.
No, dear reader, the snake was not
of the hot fudge variety.

I
4(
0
a o
0
0
8 0
0
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l
,t

Navy .filue Leads
the Parade of
Chic' Spring Suits

Dependable, scientific, Drugless
EYE
EXAMINATIONS
Phone 590 for appointment
Emil H Arnold
Optometrist 220 S. lain St
Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit. Ann Arboi and Jackson
(March 30, 1919)
(Central Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8:1o a.
In., and hourly to 8: o. p. i.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-7:48
a. ni., and every hour to 9:48 p. n,. (Ex-
tresses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., 9:05 a.
m. and every two hours to 9:05 p. m., 10:ao
p. In. To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. n., 12:20
a. in., i:o a. n., and to Saline, change at
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:48 a. in. and
11:20 p.Iii.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a m, to 12:00 p. m
Phone 1620-R

i

but there the similarity ends, for each and every
model shows some charming touch of individuality
which sets it apart from its neighbor.
Smart tailleurs are receiving 'perhaps the most at-
tention this spring. They are distinguished from the
usual suit of this type by fashion, notes distinctly
characteristic of this season's modes-such as unique-
ly designed vestees of white or color in tricollette or
some other new material.

The city editor
he tried to flirt
operator but his
der.

told us today that
with the telephone
line got out of or-

t
t
1

He Remembered
Brown has a

His Table Manners
lovely baby girl

His heart is in a flutter
He named her "Oleomargine"
For he hadn't any but her.
.Famous Closing Lines.. ....
"That remains to be seen," sighed
the butler as he dropped a custard
pie on the ball room floor.
LOUIS XVI.
WOMEN OF WESTERN COLLEGE
CORRESPOND WITH FRENCIIIES
"A fair exchange is no robbery," at
least so say the 39 students of West-
eru: college for women at Oxford, 0,
wih are corresponding with an equal
number -of "Frenchies" in Eprope for
the purpose of bettering their own
French and aiding our one time ally
friends to perfect their English.
War hardened soldiers and in-
structors in the universities of France
Bargains in Baseball Mitts -at Wahr's
University Book Store.-Adv.

The box wuits, often quite elaborately trimmed with
black silk military braid and showing unusually
clever treatment as to collars, are prime favorites with
the younger set.
Poiret twill, gabardine, tricohine and fine men s
wear serge are the favored materials. Several suits
with a fine hair stripe of white are very smart.
Suits of homespun and Scotch mixtures may be
found by the Woman looking for a very serviceable
and conservative suit, which at the same time is
smart in appearance.

.Agiiii6

314 S. State St.

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small
The Ann Arbor Sayings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources .........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

Anit Arbor

$25 to $75

1

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