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April 15, 1919 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-15

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..W.._

ASSOCIATED
~ ~ ~ I I" itt~PRESS
PROBABLY RAIN AMY AND NIHT IR
WARERL XXXi SERVICE
VOL. XXIX. No. 133. ANN, ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 199. PRICE THREE CZ

JOHN GALSWORTHY,
MANOF. L LTES
MI "O WILL SPEAK HERE
EMINENT WRITER B1OU1GHT BY
TfE ORATORICAL
ASSOCIAION
RELATION OF BRITON
AND AMERICAN-TOPIC
Became Famous as Champion of Social
Betterment Amongflasses
of England
John Galsworthy, essayist, poet,
short story writer, novelist, and dra-
matist, who lectures at 7:45 o'clock
Wednesday night in Hill auditorium
under the auspices of the University
Oratorical association, is-known as one
of the foremost men of letters to lec-
ture in this country since the time of
Matthew Arnold. His subject is "Brit-
. on and American."
Won Fame as Writer
It is in the field of drama that Gals-
worty has done his best work, and
though in many respects he has not
equalled some of the leading dramat-
ists, he has surpassedthem all in his
sympathetic powers, his understand-
ing, and keen thought. His novels,
"The Man of Property," "The Country
House," "Fraternity," and "The Free-
lands," show an ability for character
analysis which but few have even ap-
proached.
Attacked Prison Systems
His works have been devoted stead-
ily to the betterment of social condi-
tions, his essays and several of his
dramas entitling him to a place with
Charles Dickens as a reformer of Eng-
lish prisons and court procedure.
In an effort to make it possible for
all to attend, tickets haverbeen put
on sale at the nominal price of 50
eents and may be obtained at
Sheehan's, and Callahan's book stores.
Lecture to Begin Promptly
Due to the fact that Mr. Galsworthy
must leave on the 9:30 o'clock train
all people are requested to le in their
seats by 7:30 o'clock.
UNITERSITY BIOLOGY
STATIN ONE OF BEST
SUM~MER CAMP OFFERS MANY
ATTRACTIVE FEATURES FOR
WORK AND PLEASURE
"Students from Colorado, Missis-
sippi,,Massachusetts, and many other,
parts of the country come to the
Summer Session of the Biological Sta-
tion at Douglas lake each year," was
the statement of Prof. George R. La-
Rue.
"This station is not equalled by any
other fresh water Biological Station
in the country, according to the opin-
ions of investigators who have worked
or visited at the more important
Biological stations of the United
States and Canada. It has acquired
this reputation not because of its
buildings but because of the oppor-
tunities for serious work it offers to
visiting scientists, its staff members,
and students.
Students of Biology Eligible
'Any student is eligible for reg tra
tion at the station who has had an
elmentary college course in botany,
zoology, or biology. To such students

a number of courses are open both in
zoology and botany, for which prop-
er credit is given in the University.
"Students and staff members live in
comfortable, well built tents, equipped
with cots, mattresses, stove, chairs,
table, and other articles. All members
of the staff board at the mess where
excellent meals are served at a mod-
erate rate. The actual cost last sea-
son for board was $4.68 a week for
each person.
.Swimning Is Chief Sport
"The lake furnishes the chi soure-
es of amusement. Swimming is pat
o th dal pr g a ,ln ud m a_ encouraged to use the boats that be
long to the station. . Bonfires on the
beach and camp sings have their place
on the calendar of events.
Students and others interested in the
work of the station may secure further
information by applying at the offices
of the Summer Session in Main hall,
or to Professor La Rue in room 229

DVIS '17, BACK
FROM OVERSEAS
Horace Lee Davis, '17, well known
in Chicago and Ann Arbor musical cir-
cles, where he has been a pupil of Mr.
Harrisonffor several years, has re-
turned to Ann Arbor after a year in
service. He trained at Camp Custer
and left for France with the 338 regi-
ment about a year ago. At the time
of the signing of the arcistice he was
near the front line trenches.
After a short course of study under ]
Mr. Harrison he will go to Chicago,
where he has a number of very at-
tractive concerts already booked.
TONY S WILL SHOW
19MARNTTES THURSDAY

ALTHOGH LITTLE KNOWN
A1E RICA, IS POPULAR

IN

.A BROA I)
An exhibition of tiny marionettes, a
means of entertainment little known
in the United States, but one of the
most popular in foreign countries, will
be shown the 'people of Ann Arbor'
Thursday. Tony Sarg brings these
small dolls under the auspices of the
Collegiate Alumnae.
W1ilG ive Two Performances
Two performances, a matinee and
an evening performance at 8 o'clock
will be given in the Natural Science
auditorium at which three plays will
be presented, "The Rose and the Ring,"
"A Night at Delhi1' or "The Snake
Charmer," and "The Music Lesson."
These small creatures are exact re-
plicas of men, and by means of num-
Brousstrings their movements are
controlled. Movements of the arms, the
legs, the head are governed, and in
this manner even such slight move-
ments as facial expression, or move-
ments of the fingers are directed.
Althoughr they are only 18 inches in
height, these miniature people appear
to be three feet in height. Dressed
like humans, they carry their part
well. The stage settings are in pro-
portion to the figures of the actors
and all appears like a modern stage
viewed through the wrong end of an
opera glass.
Entertainment is Popular
Mr. Sarg has given performances at
Boston, New York, and Detroit where
he received a hearty reception. In
Detroit four extra performances were
needed to satisfy the demand of the
theater going public. '
These puppets were fashioned by
Mr. Sarg with his own hands. His
experience with these dolls ,in past
performances in London enabled him
to perfect them to their present degree
both in their construction and in their
flawless performance. They are work-
ed by strings and the direction of their
movements is a difficult task.
'BACK NUMBER" OF
GARGOYLE IMPENDS
"Back, back, Oh Time, in thy
flight,' 'said the staff of the Gargoyle,
as it made ready for this month's is-
sue, and then it proceeded to produce
the "Back Number," which appears on
Thursday of this week.
Jests on ancient things and draw-
ings of bygone subjects fill the 40
pages. One full page drawing con-
trasts the "Please" signs of the cam-
,pas 45 years ago with those of to-
day. Then there is "Walla's Wager,"
with its advice to the lovelorn, or
"Some Famous Backs" to please those
with other turns of mind. For those
who would read how the janitor came
back, the Gargoyle has included
"Killed by Thought."
Major Haff, '13, Vists Ann Arbor
Major C. B. Haff, '13, who was dis-
charged from the United States army
on April 4, has been in Ann Arbor fbr
several days. Major Haff has been sta-
tioned at Camp Merritt and at the port
of embarkation at Hoboken, N. J.

MEMBERS OF OPERA
CAST ENTERTA1IE
ON ANNUALTOUR
FACILITIES FOR TRANSPORTA-
TION ARE PERFECT
DURING TRIP
BIG AUDIENCES SEE
SHOW IN ALL CITIES
Homer Heath Reports Heavy Expenses
on Trip, But Small Profits
Made
Entertainment in the form of dances,
dinners, swarms of girls, and the ap-
preciation of jovial audiences was on
the program for the entire ensemble of
"Come On, Dad" during the state trip
Easter vacation week.
Wreck Delays tSart
The start from Ann Arbor was made
slightly behind schedule time, due to
a railroad wreck near Detroit, but
everyone was on hand for the dinner
that noon in Jackson. Only one
Pullman car was available for this
run, but therother two cars arrived in
time to carry the men to the next
stop. The performance in Jackson
was pronounced by some to be a tri-
fle below par, due to the fact that
most of the principals and cast were
just recovering from the Hop.
A dance at the Armory was attend-
ed after the show and then the cars
were boarded for Flint.
Inability of the chorus to circle back
of the stage in the "Diplomacy" scene
because of the narrow depth of the
theater did not seem to detract from
the success of the play judging from
the applause of the audience in Flint.
Have Many. anees
The orchestra was inconvenienced
considerably in Flint since they had
to return to the station after supper
to dress on the train. "A lot of good
farm land was spoiled when this town
was built," was remarked by one of
the chorus. Sarnia, the town across
the river from Port Huron, proved
somewhat of an attraction for some
of the men. "Going abroad" was a
novelty to them. A well, attended
dance was in order after the perform-
ance.
Everyone was urged to be back in
his respective bunk by 2 o'clock every
night. The train rarely left before 4 or
5 o'clock, but the experienced men in
charge of the tour wanted to make
sure that everyone was along when
they did leave.
Not a frown was to be seen at the
afternoon tea dance at the East Sag-
inaw Country club the next day. The
past show dance was, as usual, a fine
success.
Donal Haines Sees Show
Donal H. Haines, author of the
opera book, was with the men at Kal-
amazoo. The dinner that evening was
a jolly affair. The attendance at the
performance was only fair but seem-
ed well appreciated.
The stay in Grand Rapids was pro-
nounced by many to be "the best
ever." Regent Benjamin S. .Hanchett
entertained the personnel royally at
his home just outside the city. "Re-
gent Hanchett must have a monopoly
on the pretty girl trust," sighed a
happy sophomore. Special cars took
the company to the Kent County Coun-
try club for supper that evening, and
from there they were driven to the
theater.
* Nash Sings Prologue
David D. Nash, '20, sang the pro-
logue during the trip as Carlos E.

Zanelli, '20E, was unable to go. Igen-
tion was made by a number of ad-
miring people at every city' of the'
unique curtain used in the show.
"A definite statement concerning the
finances of the opera cannot be given
for a few days," said Homer L. Heath,
secretary of the -Union. "All of the
bills have not yet been received.
Heavy expenses made it impossible to
realize much profit but we came out
ahead at least."

75TH ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT WEEK
WILL BE HUGE VICTORY CELEBRATION;
ADDRHESS BY PRESIDENT HUTCHINS

Next Week To See Launching
Of Great Victory Liberty Loan

Next week the campaign for the
Victory Liberty Loan will begin.
In Ann Arbor headquarters for the
drive will be in the old Goodyear build-
ing next to the First National bank
building, on Main street. At this place
all those wishing to buy bonds are
asked to come and subscribe on the
first three days of next week, Monday,
Tuesday, and Wednesday.
Twenty expert salesmen, the best in
the city, will be present to sell the
bonds and all the banks will furnish
one representative to fill out applica-
tion blanks. In these three days all
the people are asked to volunteer.
A luncheon will be given Wednes-

day, probably at the Y. M. C. A., and
the lists will by checked over. Teams
will then be appointed to canvass the
city to secure the subscriptions of
those who have not subscribed.
The teams will explain the attrac-
tive method of investment which is of-
fered, and how to pay for the bonds.
The partial payment plan will be used.
Ten per cent will be paid down, and
the rest from time to time..
The people are requested not to take
the money out of the banks because it
will cause financial instability. By
paying at differtnt times, it is hoped
that -the people will save the money
from their summer's earnings.

MICHIGAN MAN INJURED
San Diego, Calif., April 14.-
Eight enlisted men, one officer
and one civilian on the United
States submarine chaser 297, ly-
ing port here, were seriously
burned in -an explosion on the
ship shortly after noon today.
The injured include Ensign Al-
len T. Belknat, -of Niles, Mich.
in command -of the vessel. All
ten were badly burned and it is
believed a majority will suc-
cumb to their injuries.
! .. E
ROBERT DIETERLE
WINS IN CONTEST
Robert R. Dieterle, of the School of
Music, who recently won first place
in the state contest for young singers
held by the Federated Women's Mus-
ical Clubs, repeated that success at
the sectional contest held in Chicago,
Friday, April 11.
He-was the Michigan representative
in this contest, which included en-
tries from Ohio, Illinois, Iowa, and
Michigan. His victory entitles him to
compete in the national contest to
be held in Peterboro, New Hampshire,
later in the year.
After the contest a program was
given by the winners and medals were
awarded. The three departments judg-
ed were piano, voice and violin, and
the winner in each was given the
Federation gold medal and a certifi-
cate of honor.
MAJOR HUGH M. BEEBEE TO -
SAIL FOR STATES APRIL 12
Major Hugh M. Beebee, formerly
professor of surgery in the Homoeopa-
thic Medical school, and who-has been
in the service of the United States
army for the past two years, will sail
April 12 from Bordeaux, France, for
this country.
Major Beebee has been overseas dur-
ing the last year in active service
with the American army. At present
it is expected that he will resume his
former position with the local school
when he returns.
SMALL BLAZE IN CHEMISTRY
BUILDING CAUSES SLIGHT LOSS
An alarm of fire was turned in from
the University at 3:30 o'clock Mon-
day afternoon, when an electric motor
in room 165 of the Chemistry building
burned out. Prof. D. M. Lichtig of the
chemistry department discovered the
fire. When found, the heat of the
burning motor had caught some heavy'
green curtains which were made to
draw across the skylight of the lec-
ture rom, and a fair sized blaze was
started. The damage was slight.

OVER TWO THOUSAND ALUMNI
ARE EXPECTED. BACK FOR
WEEK
NEARLY ALL CLASSES
WILL HOLD REUNIONS
RecognItion Viii be (Aiven to Men
Who Have Been in Serv-
lee
As an appropriate conclusion to his
ten years of service as head of the
University, President Harry B. Hutch-
ins will deliver the Commencement
address of the seventy-fifth Annual
Commencement this year. Commence-
ment Day will be Thursday, June 26,
1919. The President had not an-
nounced the subject of his address
Monday.
The 2,500 returning alumni who are
expected, plan to make Reunion Day,
June 24, and Alumni Day, Wednesday,
June 25; a huge victory celebration.
It has been suggested that returning
alumni who have been in service wear
their uniformst Efforts are being
made to obtain the opinions of differ-
ent alumni on this subject. The Uni-
versity has made plans to get back as
many alumni as possible.f
The program for Commencement
week is as follows:
Sunday, June 22, Baccalaureate ad-
dress to the graduating classes of
all colleges and schools in Hill audi-
torium.
Monday, June 23, Alumni registra-
tion opens in Alumni.Memorial hall
Class badges and tickets to various
events will be given out only upon
registration. Class Day exercises in
the Law school. Evening: Senior
reception and ball given by the gradu-
ating classes of all the colleges and
schools, in the Armory.
Tuesday, June 24, Reunion Day: As
far as has been scheduled the follow-
ing classes will hold reunions: '66M,
'69, '73, '83, '84, '94, '94M, '94L, '94D,
'02, '04, '04L, '05 '07E, 09, '10, '16L,'17.
Class day exercises in the literary
college will be held at 10 o'clock in
the morning. 7:30 o'clock. Annual.
senior promenade on the campus. At
8 o'clock the annual senior girls' play
will be presented in the campus thea-
ter. 8:30 o'clock, student entertain-
ment in Hill auditorium.
Wednesday, June 28, Alumni Day:
Automobile rides in the morning
through kindness of Ann Arbor citi-
zens; 9:30 o'clock, annual Alumni
meeting in University club room, Alum-
ni Memorial hall; 12:30 o'clock, Alum-
ni buffet luncheon; 2:30 o'clock Me-
morial exercises in honor of Michigan
men who died in the service, Hill aud-
itorium; Senate reception Alumni Me-
morial hall at 8:30 o'clock in the even-
ing.
Thursday, June 26, Seventy-fifth an-
nual commencement; 10 o'clock, Com-
mencement exercises. Address by
President Harry B. Hutchins.

HUN PEACE ENVOYS-1
TO STARTARLY
APRIL 25-WILSON
VERSAILLES TO RECEIVE GERMAN
PLENIPOTENTIARIES, SAYS
PRESIDENT
HUNS BALK AT DISPOSAt
OF S A R R E TERRITOR
Spanish Cabinet Resigns; Communist
Engage in Heavy Fighting
- in Munich
(By Associated Press)
Paris, April 14. - In a statemen
which is about to be issued by Presi
dent Wilson, announcement will b
made that the German peace dele
gates will be summoned to Versaille
April 25.
The Presid'ent declares, in behalf
the council of four, that the question
of peace are so near a complete solu
tion that they will be quickly and fin
ally drafted.
In regard to the problems present
ed by Italy, President Wilson hope
for quick agreement. The Adriati
question will be given preference ove
all other matters.
Madrid, April 14. - The Spanisl
cabinet has resigned.
Berlin, April 14. - The German gov
ernment is firmly resolved to refus
to discuss at the peace congress the
future allegiance of the Sarre terrn
tory, according to a Berlin news agen
cy on what it terms competent au
thority. The government will "reso
lutely reject any proposal to tear th
Sarre territory from the empire b:
means of a general plebiscite."
Berlin, April 14.-The latest. new
received here is to the effect that ths
communists in Munich have not ye
been mastered and that heavy fightni
is raging in the streets of Munich be
tween Red guards and troops loyal t
the government. The central railwa:
station, th postoffice, and telegrapi
office and several other public lhuIld
ings again are in the hands of th
communists who used heavy min
throwers in. their recapture.
A humber of persons have been kill
ed or wounded.
ELIOT OUTLINES
NEW LABOR BIL
As a means of realizing just cc
operation between capital and labo
and for settling industrial strife, a bil
was outlined by Charles W. Elio1
president-emeritus~of Harvard univer
sity, preparatory to the appointmen
of a commission to study the hour
of labor in Massachusetts industries
The main points of the bill are as fol
lows:
1. Willing adoption by both pat
ties of the ultimate decisions of
national government board which ma
be called upon, to settle any dispute
that may arise.
2. Recognition by both partes th
a formidable danger threatens ci
iliation and that all Americans shoul
unite to suppress anarchy and violen
socialism.
3. General acceptance of the viel
that American victories are to be pre
served just as they have been won..
Dr. Eliot favored the bill, chiefly, b
said, "because I believe it to be ine:.

pedient, not to say absurd, to attemp;
to fix by law the same number c
hours for all industries without re
gard for their diversities, or for al
establishments in the same industry
"The war between capital and ls
bor," continued Dr. Eliot, "is gettin
to a stage which seriously endanger
the existing industrial and sociE
structures in most of the civilized ns
tions. After the firm establishment o
a limited League of Nations, wit
plenty of force at command, the thin
most to be desired by the free, and b
those who are hoping to become free
is a finalsettlement of this industria'
strife."
French Warfare Supersedes Cavalr
At the beginning of the war in Eu
rope it was believed that there woul
be much work for cavalry units, bu
the system of trench warfare which de
veloped made that important militar
arm of much less service than in pre
vious wars.

Eminnt LCTUR

British Author John Galsworthy
"Briton and American" Hill Auditorium, Wed., Apr. 1

READING
c6 .7:45 PAF

Box office open at 7:i;. Tickets 5oc at Wahr's, Slater 's and Sheehan 's
Auspices of the Oratorical Association

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