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April 03, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-04-03

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II

THE WEATHER
PROBABLY RAIN
WARNER'

Ar 410
vw-qbll

:1IAitF

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

i

VOL. XXIX. No. 131.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 3, 1919.

PRICE THREE CENTS

"JAPAN TOO PROUD TOACCEPTPLAgCE
OF INFERIORITY IN & LEAGUE WITH lCA ICMITIO,-MKN

ichigan Cities Take Stand In
Favor Of Higher Pay For Teachers

LEADERS BELIEVE EFFORTS TO BOOST
FACULTY SALARIES WILL MEET WITH
SUCCESS; MOVEMENT IS NATION-WIDE

JAPANESE WILLING TO
COVENANT TO KEEP
PEACE
1 _____

JOINT

LABORER IMMIGR ANTS
NOT ISLAND'S DESIRE
Korea Will 4dopt Republican From of
Goverment If Freedom is
Gained, Says Wang
London April 2.-Several hundred
persons were killed In further rioting
at Franfort-on-the-Nain yesterday ac-
cording to a Copenhagen dispatch to
the Exchange Telegraph company.
The hotels of the citrwere plundered
during the disorder.
Paris, April 2.-No Asiatic nation
could be happy in a League of Nations
in which sharp racial discrimination
is maintaine, dBaron Makino,head of
the. Japanese delegation to the con-
ference declared in a statement to the
Associated Press today on the position
of Japan.
Not Too Proud to Fight
"We are not too proud to fight," the
Baron said, "but we are too proud to
accept a place of admitted inferiority
in dealing with one or more associate
nations. We want nothing but simple
justice.
"Japan is glad to join a League of
- Nations to maintain peace and order,"
the Baron added. "Japan does not
wish," he continued, "to furnish lab-
orers as immigrants to any associate
country and recognizes that this ques-
tion is one for each nation to deal
with Itself.
Deserves Frank Admission
"Japan feels that it is entitled to a
frank and open admission by the Al-
lies, that the principle of equity and
justice is a fundamental pennant of
the Leaue of Nations. Japan sees
difficulty in the way of a permanent
and successful operation of the
league," he asserted, "unless the con-
tracting parties enter it with mutual
respect."
Korea to Adopt Republi
San Francisco, April 2.-"Korea is
certain to adopt a Republican form of
governmentin the event she achieves
her. desire to become independent of
Japan," said the Hon. Wang Ching
Wa who arrived here today from
China on his way to the Paris peace
conferencehto act in the capacity of
adviser to the Chinese delegates. "In
her'efforts to secure her independence
she has the entire moral support of
China," said Mr. Wang.
"China has no ambitions in th mat-
ter of Korea. That she should be-
come freed of Japanese dominence
only to become subject to China is not
our idea of the principle of self de-
(Continued on Page Six)
HONORARY ENINEEING
SOCIETY ELECTSlEIN
TAU BETA' P1 PICKS MEN ON
BASIS OF SCHOLARSHIP AND
FELLOWSHIP
Eleven members of the junior engi-
neering class have been elected to
membership in Tau Beta Pi, national
honorary engineering fraternity. They
are as follows:
G. R. Anderson, C. 0. Barton, G. E.
Campbell, J. M. Darbaker, C. R. Ford,
J. E. Goodwillie, B. Douglas, M. F.
Gardner, C. T. Hogan, C. W. Huff, F.
H. Taylor
These men are selected uon a basis
of scholarshp and goodfellowship by
the University of Michigan branch of
the organization, which includes in
its membership 29 chapters.
Tau Beta Pi selects members at its
spring election from among the up-
per eighth of the junior class, as view-
ed from a scholastic basis. At the
succeeding fall election, other mem-
bers are chosen from the upper fourth
of the senior class.

JUNIOR GIRLS SCORE'
GREAT HIT 'IN"OD
(By h1rgierite Clark)
"Gold" was the name of the Jilor
Girls' play, written by Pauline Bene-
dict-Fischer, '20, given in the Whitney
theater last evening, and it was pure
gold from beginning to end.
There was no star role for it was
an all-star cast. The play began with
a one hundred percent staging of a
woodland scene, Fixette, Queen of
Sprites, Myrna Goodrich, and her
band of fairies flitting here and there
in enchanting and rhythmic dance.
Margaret Jewell, as Eve Templeton,
queen of vamps, later gave unmistak-
able evidence that she is well versed
in that art. Ruth Abbott, as Fluffy, a
dancing girl, captivated onlookers.
Devil Present
The Devil was there, too, in Harriet
Woodworth, and, as she said herself,
she was "just a devilish little devil."
The leading men's parts were taken
by Helen Cady, as Jim; Grace Hall,
as Harry, a dancing man, and Anna
Noble, as Silas, a country chap.
One of the best features was "The
Syncopated Soldier Man" chorus led
by Sue Verlenden as General Issimo.
Credit Due Prof. Brunim
Considerable credit for the success-
ful production of the play must be
given to Prof. John R. Brumm, who
directed the rehearsals and perform-
ance, and also to Laura Peocock, who
was general chairman.
RED CROSS OPENS LAST
ORIVE FOR OLD CLOTHES

Due to the recent agitation for
higher wages for teachers. throughout
the state, the appointment committee
receives notices daily of towns and ci-
ties who have taken a stand for a sal-
ary of $1,000 at least for their women
teachers."
Grand Ledge, a city of 3,300 popu-
lation, has established a minimum
wage of $1,050 for high school teach-
ers. Allegan has advanced the sal-
aries of their grade teachers $250.
This tendency on the part of a few
progressive cities is -ontrasted with
the general wages pai to a normal or
university graduate, which runs be-
tween $800 and $900.

The appointment committee has re-
ceived statistics from women teach-
ers which show actual conditions.
Thirteen teachers living in a city of
18,000 estimated their minimum ex-
penses as follows: board, room and
laundry, $468; clothing, $313.45; mis-
cellaneous, $86; making a total of
$867.45. This does not include say-
iugs, contributions or debts.
The Michigan State Teachers' asso-
ciation is trying to impress the state
that unless better wages are paid, the
quality of their teachers will decrease
and the educational system will de-'
cline.

DONATIONS TO BE USED
STRICKEN PEOPLE OF
EUROPE

FORI

What is probably the last local Red
Cross clothing drive opened in Wash-
tenaw county Wednesday. The -cam-
paign was set ahead several days in
order to get student contributions be-
fore spring vacation begins. The drive
will be ended when the University re-
sumes its session.
Thetcampaign comes at a particu-
larly timely date, for much clothing
which ordinarily would be packed
away at this season of the year to
suffer the ravages of moths can be
used to great benefit now. The con-
tributions are to be devoted to the sf-
fering poor of Europe.
Expect Much
"Much is expected from University
students in this matter," said Mrs.
George W. Patterson, chairman of the
publicity committee, Thursday. "We
see no reason to expect another cam-
paign of this sort, and hence we hope
for generous contributions from" the
student body.
"Due to the short time before vaca-
tion it is asked that contributions be
made at once."
Betwen 2,000 and 3,000 pounds of
clothing should come from Uuiver-
sity students, she said. The quota for
the county is 9,000, but it is hoped at
least to double this amount.
No Uniforms Needed
All kinds of men's, women's, and
children's clothing are asked for.
However, no uniforms can be received.
Men students may leave their con-
tributions at the desk in the Union,
with Mr. Brown. Women students are
requested to leave theirs in the base-
ment of Barbour gymnasium.
Anyone not able to bring his cloth-
ing to these places may get some one
to call for his contribution by tele-
phoning 2799, the Ann Arbor branch
of the Red Cross at 608 E. Williams
street, any afternoon.
Residents of Ann Arbor will have a
chance to contribute clothing to the
drive next week. Headquarters will
be announced later.

HOP DECRATIONS
AR[RELLIN PLACE
Booth Furniture May Be Arrange1
Starting Thursday A fer-
noon
MUST BE IN READINESS BY
3 O'CLOCK FRIDAY AFTERNOON
Waterman gymansium looked much
like it will Friday night, the night of
the Hop, when the lights were turned
on Wednesday night. No lights above
the decorations burned, and all the
light came from suspended shades or
from lamps on the posts of the fra-
ternity booths.
Indirect Lighting
This system of indirect lighting
gives a pink glow to the decorations
and throws an illumination about the
gymnasium which is sufficient to ren-
der all objects plainly visible.
Fraternities may start placing the
furniture in their booths Thursday
afternoon, and this work must be
completed by 3 o'clock Friday after-
noon. Three strips of colored bunt-
ing at the top of the booths will des-
ignate the divisions of one from an-
other.
Punch will be trnished by the Hop
committee, but all booths must have
a punch bowl, punch glasses, and waf-
er trays. The grand march will start
promptly at 9 o'clock and those who
are late will not be included in the
U. of M. which is formed at the con-
clusion of the march.
Provide for Smokers
Arrangements have been made for.
a smoking room in the south part of
the Waterman gymnasium basement
as fire laws prohibit smoking else-
where. Gentlemen's check rooms will
be situated on the second floor of the
Barbour gymnasium, and the ladies'
cloak rooms will be in the basement.
Flowers are prohibited and they will
all be checked at the door.
LESS WATER USED
BY METERED TAPS
From a report based on statistics
taken in 300 tities of the country the
following important facts were gath-
ered in regard to the water meter
question, according to the informa-
tion given out by Prof. Edwin C. God-
dard yesterday.
In cities with population similar to
Ann Arbor it was noted that with
only 25 per cent of the city taps me-
tered there was a consumption of 154
gallons per capita each day. In other
cities of the same size where 75 per
cent of the taps were metered there
was a consumption per capita of 58
gallons.
These figures show a decrease in
water consumption of 100 gallons per
capita where the increase in meters
used amounted to 50 per cent.
Ann Arbor today is averaging 169
gallons per capita each day. This is
98 gallons per capita more than any
other city of the group of 300 is us-
ing.
"These statistics are taken from the
water works hand book and should
give the citizens of Ann Arbor a very
good idea of the present large con-
sumption of water in our city. It
proves conclusively the amount of
water that can be conserved through
the use of meters here," said Profes-
sor Goddard.

UNION CAM PAIGN
OPENS IN DETROIT
IProminent Alun ni Inspect Unfinished
Building; Will Work Until Goal
Is Reached
CAPTAINS REPRESENT EVERY
CLASS WITH LIVING MEMBERS
Starting a campaign in Detroit for
$100,000 of the $300,000 to be raised
for finishing the Union, 43 of Detroit's
most prominent alumni inspected the
unfinished building standing at the
corner of State and South University.
Fllowing the inspection, these men
had dinner in the assembly room of
the Union. President Harry B. Hutch-
ins was toastmaster, and several men
made speeches upon the undertaking1
of raising the money. Among the men
who spoke were Regent James 0. Mur-
fin and Mr. Horace Peabody.
WorkersAgreed
Every man agreed to use his utmost
powers to put over the task before
them. If the money is not raised, it
means that next September the Union
will be closed for want of funds. If
the money is secured, it means that
the students will return next fall to
a completed building with the luxu-
ries which went long ago planned.
This campaign will not stop until
the money is raised, according to
Homer Heath, secretary of the Union.
Last night saw the start of the cam-
paigning in Detroit but it began else-
where last week.
Before the banquet in Ann Arbor,
luncheon was kiven by Regent Mur-
fin at the Detroit club, swhere.pre-
liminary plans were discussed. A
special interurban was then hired to
bring the men to Ann Arbor and they
arrived here at 4 o'clock,leaving at
8:15.
All Classes Represented
These men were the team captains
and represent practically every class
or which the members are living. An
advance editorial of the April Alum-
nus in behalf of the Union was dis-
tributed. Efforts are being made to
put this campaign forMichigan across
in record 'time, and every man of the
committee agreed to exert his efforts
towards this end.
DORMS TO FAVOR
4TH YEAR WOMEN
Places vacated by freshman girls at
the Martha Cook dormitory are to be
filled next year by seniors who have
lived in league houses-for three years,
the greater majority of whom are
putting themselves through college.
This is due to the fact that this dor-
mitory is to be an upper class house
with the standard for entrance based
on scholarship and campus activity.
The other vacancies in this dormi-
tory are to be divided up according
to different sections of the country,
in order that as many parts of the
country and as many schools as possi-
ble can be represented.
A large number of applications for
this house as well as for the Helen M.
Newberry residence and Alumnae
house have had to be turned down ow-
ing to lack of room.
Call Opera Rehearsal
A special opera rehearsal has been
called for 7 o'clock Thursday evening
I at the Whitney theater. Costumes will
not be worn as it is the scenic effects
that need to be gone over.

EMPHASIZES PART
OF ITALY IN WAR
"America and the world in general
do not appreciate the great part Italy
played in bringing the world war to
the rapid and unexpected end that it
did. It was after the decisive victory
of the Italians over the Austrians last
June which upset the German plan
for defeating the allies last year, that
the tide was turned against the cen-
tral powers. The Germans expected
the presence of the Austrian troops
on the west front after the latter had
put the Italians out of the fighting
after a quick and decisive blow."
The above was the statement made
by Professor Charles Upson Clark, di-
rector of the American School of
Classical Studies at Rome, who has
been working for the Italian govern-
ment in war work since hostilities be-
gan. He has visited the Italian fronts
on several occasions and also has been
intimately associated with the heads
of the government of Italy, so all in-
formation given out by him may be!
considered strictly authentic.
After the speech in which Professor
Clark set forth the above facts, slides
were shown of various places in the
Balkan states and also of many beau-
tiful Italian scenes. These were fol-
lowed by three moving picture films
taken in the mountains where the
fighting between the Austrians and
Italians took place. These films show-
ed the great difficulties the Italians
encountered in their fighting which
the troops on the western front did
not have because the fighting of the
latter was done on practically smooth
ground, while the former had the steep
mountains and large valleys to pass
over in their battles.
'MUCHWOOTD MIEN"
WILL APPEAR TONIGHT
CLASSICAL CLUB'S PLAY OF PLAU-
TUS GIVES MUCH
PROMISE
After numerous dress rehearsals,
and constant work to smooth out the
rough spots in its play, the Classical
club is ready for the performance of
"The Much Woo'ed Maiden" to be pre-
sented at 8:15 o'clock Thursday in
University hall.
Given isl Enlsh
"The Much Woo'd Maiden," follow-
ing a policy adopted last year, will
be given in English, the version used
being an adaptation of TPlautus' come-
dy, "Casin."" The club has followed
this plan in order that the work of
this old master may become more fa-
miliar to the student of today, and
the English version was considered
attractive to a wider audience.
Action centers about the households
of Lysidamus and his son, Euthynicus,
nian gentlemen. The love element is
introduced through the competition
of Lysidamsu and his on, Euthynicus,
for the hand of Casina, a supposed
slave girl of the former's wife. The
trials and tribulations which beset
Lysidamus, especially those raised by
his irate wife, form the background
for a play of humor which shows
Plautus at his best.
Contains "Punch"
In many' places, moralities of a
questionable nature in the present day
have had to be removed, but the re-
moval of these and the insertion of
new portions have given George D.
Wilner, grad, who is directing the
play, opportunities to transfer the
''punch'' of the play to that part
which is being used.
Playing in the role of Lysidamus
will be seen W. Keith Chidester, '20,
who was the leading character in last
year's production of "Phormio." Sup-
porting him, as an irate wife, will be
Elizabeth B. Oakes, '20. Gladys Turn-I
bull, '22, carries the part of Casina,
the beautiful slave girl.

CLAIMS MICHIGAN HAS ALWAYS
BEEN RATED LOW IN SAL-
ARIES PAID
RAISE PROPORTIONATE
TO LIVING COST ASKED
Practically no Change in Scale Since
1908 In Spite of Greater
Living Expense
With the favorable report of the
legislative committee concerning an
increased scale of pay for University
faculty men, the measure of an ap-
propriation for $350,000 to be used in
such channels goes before the Michi-
gan legislature to be voted upon with
all other such budget matters dur-
ing the present session.
Prospects Good
Prospects are good that the report
of the committee will be passed as
presented by the educational members,
and although it is difficult to prophesy,
leaders supporting the movement be-
lieve that, unless untoward circum-
stances arise, their efforts will be suc-
cessful.
It is remarked that within the past
month the Yale corporation has adopt-
ed a raise in the salary scale, repre-
senting a 25 per cent increase over
the existing .scale of salaries for in-
structors, and a $500 increase over the
normal scale for assistant professors.
The policy provides the following sal-
aries: instructors, first year, $1;250;
second year, $1,500; third year, $1,750;
fourth year, $2,000; assistant profes-
sors, first appointment, $2,500; second,
$3,000; third, $3,500.
Those who agree in a similar pol-
icy, for the faculty members of the
University, urge, as an especial point,
that Michigan has always been rated
low among the leading universities of
America in the rank of institutions,
paying salaries to professors. In 1908
Michigan stood 21 in a group of 27
leading colleges, in the amount of
salaries paid to professors, and 20 in
salaries of assistant professors.
Since that time there has been prac-
tically no change in the scale, and
although in many cases the cost of
living has soared 100 per cent since
then, and notwithstanding the steady
rise in prices, due both to the ab-
normal conditions before the war, and
afterward to the war, the pay of the
professor has remained the same.
Movement Widespread
In all parts of the country, during
the last month or so, there has been
activity to increase the pay of all
teachers, irrespective of grade or
rank. Mr. Chadsey, who resigned the
superintendency of the public schools
of Detroit, to accept the leadership of
the Chicago public school system, ad-
vocated, among his first announce-
ments of policy, a minimum wage of
$1,000 per year for high school teach-
ers. At the last meeting of the Na-
tional Education association, recently
held in Chicago, where the heads and
representatives of educational institu-
tions of the entire country convened
to discuss the vital problems con-
fronting the nation today among the
chief issues discussed, was the in-
crease of teachers' salaries to a scale
proportional to the cost of 'living to-
day.
STUDENT COUNCIL HOLDS IM-
PORTANT MEETING THURSDAY
A special meeting of the Student
council will be held at 7 o'clock
Thursday evening in the new Union
building. Important business requires
the presence of all members.

iI
I-

ANNOUNCE TICKET SALE
Tickets will be on sale for the
J-Hop performance of "Come
On, Dad," from 4 to 6 o'clock
Thursday at the Union, and at
10 o'clock Friday at the Whitney
theater.

rE I

Tickets at
Busy Bee
Reservations

TODAY

The MuchW
A comedy adapte
All Seats Reserved, 35c and 50c

d from t

3'd Maiden
he Latin
Corridor, University Hall

UNIVERSITY HALL

Thurs. Evening

Univ.Hall

8:15

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