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March 29, 1919 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-29

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THE WEATHERAsOCIAT~
FAIR AND SLIGHTLY DAY AND NHT
WARME. x ..B.RICE
VOL. XXIX. No. 127. ANN ARBOR, MIChIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 29, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

TO RESIST ALLIES'
REFUSAL TO LET POLES LAND AT
PORT BREACH OF ARM-
ISTICE

PLAN SENDING
DIVISIONS INTO

THREE
POLAND

Two Rumanian Army Corps Cross
Eastern Frontier to Fight
Hungarians
(By Associated Press)
' Paris, March 28.-News was re-
ceived here today that the Germans
are increasing the garrison at Danzig.
This is taken as indicating an inten-
tion to resist whatever disposition the
peace conference may make of the
fort.
Breach of Armistice
Amsterdam, March 28.-The allied
note to Germany demanding that Pol-
ish troops be allowed to land at Dan-
zig declared that refusal by Germany
Would be regarded as a breach of the
armistice, a Berlin despatch says.
The Germans replied that it could
not take the responsibility of permit-
ting the Poles to land at Danzig but
was prepared to facilitate a landing
at Stettin, Koenigsburg, Memel or
Libau.
Three Divisions for Poland
* For several weeks negotiations have
been in progress to send three Polish
divisions under General Haller to Po-
land. It was proposed to land them
at Danzig and then send them into Po-
land, but Germany objected to this
plan and offered other ports as sub-
stitutes. These Polish divisions saw
fighting in France and are fully arm-
ed and equipped. The German atti-
tude against their landing at Danzig
has been that the Poles might remain
there and hold their forts which the
Poles claim as their outlet to the
Baltic.
Paris, March 28. - The Rumanian
and Checko-Slovak governments have
taken military measures against the
Hungarian revolutionary kovernment.
Two Rumanian army corps are said
to have crossed the frontier of East-
ern Galacia.
NEW FELLOWSHIPS OPEN
STO MICHIGAN GRADUATES
DESIGNED TO TRAIN WOMEN FOR
PROFESSIONAL SOCIAL
WORK
Fellowships offered by Bryn Mawr,
Smith and Wellesley which are co-
operating with the Intercollegiate
Community Service association have
been opened to Michigan graduates.
They are designed primarily to train
women for professional social work in
either Bryn Mawr college, Simmons
college, or the Boston Shool for So-
cial Workers.
Practical settlement training in one
of the three college settelements, Bos-
ton, New York or Philadelphia, is pro-
vided in the fellowships.
Prerequisite courses, as announced,
consist of undergraduate courses in
economics, politics, sociology, psych-
ology or biology. May 1, 1919, has
been set as the last date for receiv-
ing applications. They should be sent
to Miss Hilda W. Smith, chairman of
the Intercollegiate Community Service
association, Bryn Mawr, Pa.
Army Mentality Tests Show tA" Grade
Results from the Army mentality
tests taken by 3,475 University stu-
dents on March 6 show the standard
at the University of Illinois to be A,
according to the official army basis.

Yale Instructors
Get Salary Raise
Yale instructors and assistant pro-
fessors were voted a raise in calary1
March 26, by the Yale corporation.+
The former will receive 25 per cent
and the latter $500 more than they;
have been getting.
This step was taken because the
Yale corporation feels that it should
take the lead among the colleges of
the country in placing the teaching
profession on a basis of compensation
so that it is more adequate and digni-
fied. This first increase is considered
only the initial step in bringing about
a further raise in the salaries of the
Yale faculties.
Many radical changes are planned
at Yale. A committee has been study-
ing conditions there for the last six
months and the results of their find-
ings will be the basis of these changes.
One important act all ready passed
is that Latin will not be one of the
entrance requirements hereafter.
Princeton has taen the same action
in regard to Greek.
War Garden Is
Again In Vogue
"Although the war was undoubted-
ly a stimulus to gardening last year
the people in and around Ann Arbor
do not seem to have given up the
'back to the soil' idea," said Prof.
James B. Pollock, of the botany de-
partment. "The school children of the
city have already been supplied by the
city with seeds at an extremely low
charge and plans are being made to
allot sections of the fair grounds to
residents who wish to have small gar-
dens."
Last year the school children were
supplied with plots in several of the
wards and an experienced woman was
in charge in each ward. The state ap-
pointed a man to superintend school
gardens throughout Michigan. The
field on the east side of town was plow-
ed up and although some of the crops
were planted too late in the season,
the harvest amply repaid the efforts of
the amateur gardeners.
Professor Pollock offers a course in
summer school for those who want
practical garden work. Each student
Is provided with his own plot, which
he is responsible for. The course of
instruction deals mainly with the
planting, caring for, and harvesting of
every day vegetables.
PROFESSOR REEVES
ADDRESSES CLUB
Urof. J. S. Reeves, of the political
scien'ce department, addressed a well
attended meeting of the Cosmopolitan
club on the "Nature of International
Law" Friday night in University hall.
Manydphases of this subject were dis-
cussed and this proved a timely topic
in view of the fact that the gigantic
political problems of the entire world
now confront the delegates at the
Peace conference and must be settled
largely on the principles of interna-
tional law.
Following this address members of
the club discussed the annual trip to
some industrial center and it was pro-
posed that the trip this year be made
to Cleveland. No definite arrange-
ments for the visit have yet been made
and any members of the club who are
interested should be present at a

meeting which will bet held at 7:30
o'clock Monday evening in room 305
University hall.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE
PARTY ENDS YEAR
Dancing in a variety of forms fea-
t-red the last Women's league party
of the year held Friday afternoon in
Barbour gymnasium.
Preceding regular dancing in the
gymnasium, a program of fancy dances
in costume was given in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall. A doll dance by
Emma Riggs, '19, and Margaret Wi-
kaff, '19, and a French ballet dance
given by Rita Greman, '21, featured
the program. Following this, ball
rom dancing was exhibited by Ruth
Abbott, '20, and Emma Jane Min-
or, '20.
Besides University women, several
nurses from the University hospital
and from the public health department
attended the party.

8 U-BOATS LEAVE ENGLAND FOR THE STATES

Washington, March 28.-Five sur-
rendered German submarines will
leave England tomorrow for the Unit-
ed States manned by the American
crews and convoyed by the American
submarine tender, Bu'shnell. They are
expected to arrive in American wa-
ters late in April and will be display-
ed at ports to be selected in connec-
tion with the Victory Liberty Loan
campaign.
One of these craft is the U-117, a

DECORATORS STARTI
ITO BEAUTIFY GYM'
Booths Decorated by Fraternities;
Student Help Wanted
Today
APPARATUS TO BE TOTALLY
HIDDEN; NO LOUD COLORS
From a place of bare and rugged
walls, unseemly apparatus, dangling
ropes, and cold vast uninviting empti-
ness, the Waterman gymansium will
become a spot resplendant in its har-
mony of color, warmth of setting, and

DIRECTORASUE
STWO MUSIC CLUBS
Ineligibles Partly Replaced; Quality
of Clubs as Good as in Form-
er Years
GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUBS
START REGULAR REHEARSALS
Michigan is sure of a Glee club.
This is the statement Theodore Har-
rison, director of the club, made Fri-
dap.
"Although a large number are in-
eligible, 1 will form a club from the
h ta Ar Taft Tht ? ub e will he

sea going mine layer which ,in 19181
planted mines along the American
coast. Later it is expected that one
of the big cruiser submarines equip-
ped with deck guns will be sent over.
Adverse winds at this season and
the unfamiliarity of the American
crews with the machinery makes the
date of the arrival of the ships uncer-
tain. Crews for the submarines were
assembled in England, most of the
men being sent from the United
States.

general beauty. men tnat are wit. e. cLL w
With the closing of the gymnasium as good as Michigan has had in the
to athletic activities, the active work past. It will be smaller in size, but
of decorating for the 3-Hop will be- not inferior in quality.
gin. A representative of the G. W. About 50 On Club
Hunting house cotillion works, a Mr. Harrison is busy working over
large decorating and toy manufactur- the list which the eligibility commit-
ing concern of Chicago, will arrive in tee returned to him and it will be
Ann Arbor early Saturday to super- some time before the personnel of the
vise the decoration arraggements. club will be announced. Since he sent
Student Help Wanted in a much larger list of names than
All men interested in helping dec- the 60 which will compose the club,
orate the gymnasium should meet this he will be able to form a club of be-
representative at Waterman gyman- tween 40 and 50 members.
sium at 9 o'clock Saturday morning. Defficlency Made Up
The men will be well paid for the Rounding out a club from the list
work which they do. which he now has is a difficult task,
It will be no simple job to arrange but Mr. Harrison thinks that it is pos-
all the decorations in time for the sible. A number of first tenors were
doors to open for the 1920 J-Hop at 9 marked ineligible, but in try-'uts held
o'clock Friday evening, April 4. Under Thursday night, he secured enough
the running track, the fraternity and yod men to off-set this handicap.
independent booths will be erected to "In no way will the club of the cur-
care for milady between dances and rent year be inferior in quality to
those times when she wishes to sit out to those of the past. The size of the
the dance under the shade of a beau- club makes no material difference ex-
tiful lamp which will grace each booth. cept in the choice of music. A larger
(Continued on Page Six) (Continued on Page Six)
frirrielees' "Jazz" Wins Audience;
Scenery and Bizarre Offset Opera

BWoost Mtichigan"
N. J. Club Slogan
"Boost Michigan" is the slogan
adopted by the Greater Newark curb
and incorporated in their constitution
at the last meeting. The club's pub-
licity campaign to advertise Michigan
in Newark, N. J., is already meeting1
with marked success, many who will
graduate from the high school there
this year promising to come to the
University next fall.
The following officers have been
elected: Herbert Kerber, '19, presi-
dent; Louis Greenburg, '19, vice-pres-
ident; Arthur Pertzovitz, '20, secre-
tary; Eugene A. Stanchi, '22M, treas-
urer.
The next semi-monthly meeting will
be held at 7:15 o'clock Saturday even-
ing in Lane hall. The co-operation
of any faculty members coming from
New Jersey or interested in New Jer-
sey students is especially desired to
help the activities of the club.
Suffragettes Now
League Of Women
The National Woman's Suffrage as-
sociation has become the "League of
Women," the new name to be official-
ly used after the national convention
in February, 1920. This was the res-
olution adopted at the jubilee conven-
tion now in session at St. Louis. The
association although retaining its old
name for another year is organized
into two distinct sections, one of
which is composed of delegates from
non-franchised, states. Suffrage organ-
izations in states where women now
vote are expected to assume the new
name at once. It is assumed that
within a year the federal amendment
for Woman suffrage will have been
passed.
When the convention received the
news that the proposed League of Na-
tions had recognized woman suffrage,
Mrs. Carrie Chapman Catt, president,
first to see the dispatch, said: "It is
wonderful and suffrage is now recog-
nized the world over. It could not be
otherwise."
The convention received the follow-
ing message from President Wilson:
"Best wishes for convention; I earn-
estly hope suffrage amendment will
soon be adopted."
ASK STUDENTS TO
SCHOOLMEN'S MEET
Members of the University School-
men's club will attend as a unit the
annual banquet of the Michigan su-
perintendents and school boards, to be
held at 6 o'clock Monday night at the
Michigan Union. Students planning to
enter the teaching profession will be
given an opportunity to meet and hear
some of the state leaders in the work.
The topic of all-year schools will be
discussed.
Tickets for the banquet may be ob-
tained at $1 each from H. C. Baker,
president of the club; Miss Cameron,
secretary of the appointment commit-
tee; or Guy Fox, phone 941-J.
CHEM FRATERNITY
ADMITS INITIATES
Delta chapter at this University of
the Phi Lambda Upsilon national hon-
orary chemistry fraternity held its in-
itiation Friday evening in the Chem-
istry building.

The following men were taken in
at that time: E. M. Baker, J. D.
Bond, Grad., A. R. Carr, '19E, G. H.
Chidester, '20, H. J. L. Cotton, '21E,
B. Douglas, J. C. Geniesse, '20E, K-.
Harms, '20E, F. J. Helbig, '20P, C. L.
McCallum, '20E, G. F. Smith, Grad.
POLICE WATCHING
FOR BANK ROBBERS
Word was received by the Ann Ar-
bor police Friday to be on the wotch
for a car with the seven young men
in it who held up the Federal State
bank in etroit about 1 o'clockFriday
afternoon, and escaped with nearly
$60,000.
According to the information re-
ceived from Detroit the bandits effect-
ed the robbery after locking the 12
persons then in the bank in a vault,
and made their escape west on Michi-
gan avenue in a Studebaker car.

WAR DEPARTMENT
CALLS FOR 50;000
A.E[aF, VOLUNTEERS

WILL BE SENT OVERSEAS
IN SMALL CONTINGENTS

Riots Continue in Leonl; 40
Killed; Many Arrested
Japanese

Koreans
by

EARLY DUTY IN FRANCE IS
CENTIVE PROMISED
RECRUITS

(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 28.-An imme-
diate call for 50,000 volunteers for
service in Europe has been prepared
by the war department and proba-
bly will be published tomorrow.
As an incentive to enlistment the
men will be offered early duty in
France as a relief for men in the ex-
peditionary forces who wish to return
home.
Three Year Enlistment
Enlistment in this special force will
be for three years. The men will be
concentrated at Camp Meade, Mary-
land, and probably will be sent over-
seas in contingents 1,000 strong.
Preliminary Peace
Paris, March 28.-The condition of
a preliminary peace with Germany is
still being considered by -President
Wilson and the premiers of Great
lritain, France and Italy.
The four government heads today de-
liberated on the question of the Po-
lish frontier according to the newspa-
pers, who believe that there will be
some difficulty in reaching an agree-
ment on the annexation to Poland of
territory containing two to three mil-
lion Germans.
The papers believed that the council
will reach a decision sooner on the
question of repatriation than on the
Polish question.
Forty Koreans Killed
Seoul, March 25.-Riots continue in
the provinces and it is estimated that
40 Koreans have been killed in the
last few days.
New demonstrations by the Korean
nationalists have occurred in Seoul
and many Koreans were arrested by
the Japanese. Business houses here
remain closed. The general situation
here is causing anxiety among for-
eign residents.
PROF,- ADAMS WILL TLK
* AT ECONOMICS MEETING
ECONOMICS SECTION OF MI1CHI-
GAN ACADEMYOF SCIENCE
TO MEET
Several speakers of note wil be on
the program for the economics section
of the Michigan Academy of Science,
to beheld in Ann Arbor, April 3 and
4. Prof. H. C. Adams and other men
of ability are to give papers on vari-
ous affairs of economic interest.
M. A. C. Professors Will Speak
Prof. W. 0. Hedrick and E. H. Ry-
der of M. A. C. economics department
are to address this section of the
meeting. Besides these men there are
several instructors and professors
from the University who will talk.
E. F. Loyd Among Speakers
Ernest F. Loyd, a retired business
man of Detroit and at present a resi-
dent of Ann Arbor, will speak on the
significance of the automatic tool. In
the past Mr. Loyd hts attracted com-
ment by his papers and lectures on
this subject.
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman will preside,
and following each paper a discussion
will be held. As yet no definite room
in the economics building has been
decided upon for a meeting place.
MICHIGAN ANNUAL BOOK NOT
READY UNTIL AFTER VACATION
The Michiganensan will not be
ready for distribution until at least
after spring vacation, according to
Charles Osius, '20, managing editor.
The copy is now in the hands' of the
printers.
Kansas "Y" Changes to Student Plan
An entirely new organization from

the S. A. T. C. plan to the student
plan has been announced for the Uni-
versity of Kansas Y. M. C. A.

IN.

(Mark K. Ehlbert)
Among certtain peoples of the Ori-
ent there is a belief, still prevalent,
that when a man dies his soul trans-
migrates and he becomes a dog, a cat,
or a sacred billy-goat. Well, if
"Come On, Dad" were to be performed
before the worshippers of Buddha,
Brahma, Vishnu, et al., the mystic
sages would probably name Knight
Mirrielees "Sahib Jazz," which is
something like the Sanskrit for the
reincarnation of Jazz.
Knight is good. He has the effer-
vescent enthusiasm and other desir-
able attributes of the musical com-
edy favorite; and he put them all into
play at the third performance of
"Come On, Dad" Friday night at the
Whitney theater.
Wilson Makes Hit
Paul Wilson carries the leading fem-
inine role with exceptional ease and
grace. "Her" smile is ingratiating,
contagious; and her singing and danc-
ing are above par.
Paul Moore still remains "true to
himself," too much so, in fact. Al-
though he pretends to be very anxious
to marry Mary, he is more interested
in the audience than in the object
of his affections. His good voice and
unusually graceful dancing do much,
however, to overshadow his short-
comings as an actor.
Two Good Vocalists
Dave Nash and Carlos Zanelli avail
themselves of their limited opportun-
ities to display their excellent voices.
Dave sings with all the ardor of the
artist whom he represents. In fact
he has much too good a voice for an
artist. Carlos opens the bill, with a
very melodious but mystifying ditty'
about bull fights, hot tamales, and
tambourines.
Ellett Star of Chorus
James White, is his portrayal of the

portly Broadhead, is rather diverting,
and George Duffield pleases as Mrs.
Marmaduke Wells. Matt Towar is
an amusing but rather exaggerated S.
Swanford Stokes.
Bill Ellett is the bright spot of the
chorus. He sings to the coop with
perfect nonchalance, and the first
floor's objections to him are mainly
prompted by jealousy.
"Come On, Dad" will be remembered
for its bizarre scenery and costumes,
for the music, though good in itself, is
not of the type which will retain its
popularity.
"Come On, Dad" Favorite
The music reaches its apogee in the
third act, when Knight Mirrielees
sings "Come On, Dad" with an accom-
paniment of "ballin' the jack" knee
and hip movements. From a stand-
point of pure melody, the dreamy sort,
"Romance a la Mode," and "Marry Me,
Mary," are preeminent. Harmony is
brought out best in "My Lover," with
Wilson, Waltzer, Nash and Kempf as
its exponents. "Betting" ranks sec-
ond to "Come On, Dad" as a pep in-
stiller.
Dialog'e Lacks Comedy
As to the polish of the show, com-
ment is superfidous, as Ann Arbor au-
diences have grown to expect a reas-
onle amount of gaucherie in the chor-
us of a Union opera. High heels are
not conducive to the grace of mascu-
line actions.
The book itself is replete with hum-
urous situations, but the dialogue is
almost utterly lacking in comedy.
Taken as a whole, "Come On, Dad"
is the best of Michigan's recent
operas. "Let's Go" bears no compari-
son, while "Fools' Paradise" is far
inferior in scenic and costuming ef-
fects. The 1919 Union production will
stand out as a "come-back' opera, a
show in which scenic magnificence
'reached its zenith.

OPERA BOOKS DUE JUNE 1
All persons intending to sub-
mit books for next year's opera
are notified that the books will
be due June 1. The committee
will judge them at that time and
determine the policy for next
year's production.
F. C. BELL, '19-'21L,

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