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March 16, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEAT
PROBABLY R
WARMER

HER
AIN

LL

fr i rn

4]j ttx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

L-

i

VOL. XXIX. No. 116.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 16, 1919.

PRICE THREE CENTS

4~W

..

1-'HOPCOMTE
WILL DISTRIBUTE
TICKETS BYMAIL
UIPPER CLASSMEN TO BE GIVEN
FIRST CHOICE; TICKETS
MAILED IN ORDER
$5 MUST BE SENT WITH
REQUEST FOR ADMISSION

CHEMICAL CLUB
ADDSE6MEMBERS
Iota Sigma Pi, junior honorary
chemistry society, held its annual in-
itiation Saturday afternoon. The new-
ly initiated members were Florence
Field,tJessie Metcalf, RobertaDram,
Daphine Dodd, Clara Tubbs, and Faith
Parmerlee.
The initiation was followed by a
banquet at 7:30 o'clock at Foster's
tea room, Dorothy Hall, '18E, being
toastmistress. The Alumnae guests
were Dorothy Johnson, '18, and Flor-
ence Wixson, '17P, and the chap-
erones were Prof. W. G. Smeaton and
Mrs. Smeaton, Dr. C. C. Meloche and
Mrs. Meloche, and Mr. and Mrs. R. K.
McAlpine.
CHURCHES CLOSED FOR
FIRST UNION SERVICE,

MANDOLIN CLUB
MEMBERS NAMED,

BRAUN TO TERMS
Allies to Supply Germans with Food
in Return for Merchant Fleet;
Ships Deliverkd at Once

Rehearsals to Start

Monday; ClubI

Booths for Ten Persons or
Distribution to Start
Saturday

More;I

Tickets for the J-Hop will be dis-
tributed in a different way this year
than ever before. In order to do away
with the necessity of many spending
a night in line, the committee has de-
cided to distribute the tickets by mail.
All men who send in a stamped self-
addressed envelope and, $5, the price
of the ticket, not later than noon
WTUlrsday, to W. . Harbert, 04 S.
State street, will be given considera-
°"tion 'irrespective of class. No money
will be accepted after this date.
The. former methods of distrib'ution
were never satisfactory Discovering,
through the number of applications
sent in thus far, that it would be pos-
sible to carry on the work by mail,
the committee decided ata meetig
Friday to sell the 1920 hop tickets in
this way.
Will Acpt Currency
All kinds of currency will be ac-
cepted, including checks, which are to
be made out to David D.'Nash.. Al-
/though the members of the ticket com-
mittee do -not guarantee to all who
send in money that they will receive
tickets, the money will be sent back
in the self-addressed envelope to
those who d not. Those who have
tlready applied for tickets, t ena be
safely said, will receive their admis-
Mion,
Fraternities and groups of indepen-
dents contemplating using a booth are
to send in all the names of the indi-
viduals in one list. Each man ap-
plying is to place along side of his
name his class and college.
U pper Classmen First
Preference will be shown the up-
per classmen. Juniors are to receive
first consideration, while the other
classes will come in order. This is
as it has been in former years. Such
a rule will touch none but .those who
have not yet applied for tickets but
who intend to this week. Ech fra-
ternity will be limited to two chap-
erons. Money will have to be sent
in for their tickets at the same time
the regular tickets are being sent for.
Sale Opens Saturday
The distribution will probably start
next Saturday. This method of carry-
ing on the work makes more labor for
the committee than any of the former
systems, so it will be impossible to
start sending out the tickets at an
earlier date. This means of receiv-
ing tickets will be more fair to the
professional students, whose work is
such that they could not stand in line
for most of the day.
The invitations, which are usually
given with the tickets, will be hand-
ed out later. As yet no definite meth-
od for their distribution has been de-
cided upon by the committee.
At Least 10 for Booth
Those who desire booths and have
not yet communicated to the men in
charge of this feature of the Hop,
should make their desires known to
C. T. Hogan 11I7- Washtenaw ave-
nue, at the earliest opportunity. It
will be necessary to have at least 10
men before a booth can be sold.
(Continued from Page One)
'ASKETI BAU R ITURNS
%diana basketball team defeated
te Wisconsin five by the score of 22
to.12 at Madison, Wis., Saturday night

RABBI N.
THIS

KRASS WILL SPEAK
,EVENING IN HILL
AUDITORIUM

Union services for the year will be
opened at 7:30o'clock tonight in Hill
auditorium with Rabbi Nathan Krass,
of the Central Temple of New York
City, speaking on "The Reconstruction'
of Religion." The service will be in
charge of the Jewish Students' con-
gragation of the University.
As speaker for the United War
Work campaign recently, Rabbi Krass
was responsible for the raising of
several millions of dollars. In addi-
tion to his endeavors in this cam-
paign he was engaged actively .in the
interests of the Red Cross during the
period of the war.
Present Day Authority
Rabbi Krass comes to Ann Arbor
as a leader of American Jewry; a
young man who has kept abreast of
civilization, and one who is qualified
to speak with authority on the spirit
of the changing times in the religious
world.
Special Music
Music for this Union service will bb
provided by the Temple Beth El choir
of Detroit, assisted by Abram Tyler
at the organ. Prof. William Howland,
who is leader of the choir, will be re-
membered as former head of the vocal
department of the University School
of Music.
Sunday evening services willhbe dis-'
pensed with in the various churches
in order that all may take advantage
of the opportunity of hearing Rabbi
Krass. The general public, as well as
the student body, is invited.
Might Couduct ForuM
If train connections permit it, Rabbi
Krass will conduct the student forum
in Lane hall directly after his lecture
in Hill auditorium.
ENSIGN C. F. LAMBERT RETURNS
AFTER YEAR AT GREAT LAKES
Charles F. Lambert, ex-'19, has re-
turned to resume his college work in
the University. Lambert enlisted in
the coast patrol in the spring of 1917
and in the fall returned to the Univer-
sity on an indefinite furlough. In the
spring of 1918 he left the University
and went to the bnsigns' school at
Great -Lakes where he received his
commission. Since then he has been
instructing in the school' at Great
Lakes. During his college furlough
he was prominent in the R. 0. T. C.
here, having been appointed regiment-
al sergeant-major.
CERCLE FRANCAIS TO HOLD
RY .WEEKLY LECTURE
The Cercle Francais fortnightly lec-
ture will be given by Prof. W. A. Mc-
Laughlin at 4:15 o'clock Wednesday
afternoon, March 19, in room 203, Tap-
pan hall.
His subject will be "Caen Ville
d'Art de la Parmandie," and is to be
illustrated.

Needs More Gitar
Players
2S RECEIVE APPOINTMENTS;
PLANS INDICATE BUSY SEASON
Making a later start than ever be-
fore in the history of the University,
the Mandolin club is getting ready for
an unusual busy season. Although it
was known only a few days ago that a
club would be organized, plans for re-
hearsals have already been made, the
first rehearsal to be held at 7 o'clock
Monday night in University hall.
Twenty-eight Appointed
From the recent tryouts the fol-
lowing were picked. for this year's
club: mandolins-W. C. Allee, L; N.
W. Bourne, '22M; H. R. Briegs, '20;
G. C. Brown, '20E; H. T. Corson, '18E;.
E. Davis, '21; C. B. Garlock, '20E; J.
R. Gebhart, '21E; C. E. Hammond, '22;
E. T. Jones, '19; R. Khune, '21; S. W.
Immerman, '22; L. F. Laverty, grad.;
C. H. Mason, '20; Harold Remine,'20E
L. J. Schindler, '20E; J. F. Schoerger;
'21; C. J. Schimdt, '22; H. C. Simons,
Jr., '20; Stanley Tobias, '19E; G. O.
True, '21; T. J.'Whinery, '21. Guitars:
R. V. Beshgetoor, grad.; F. E. Mottey,
'22M. Flute: H.. V. Pruch, '21L. Vio-
lin: U. A. Carpenter, 22M. Cello: E.
A. Osius, '21M. Bass W. F.
Tschaeche, '20E.
Need More Guitars
There is only one weak place in the
club and that is found in the guitars.
More guitar players could be used by
Mr. Tabrand players of these instru-
ments may secure a hearing by mak-
ing an appointment with him by call-
ing 1505.
YPSILANTI NORMAL
TO PRESENT SONGS
In quaint and picturesque replicas
of the old time gowns, the Ypsilanti
Normal college choir will present a
program of songs in keeping with
their medieval costumes at 8 o'clock
Wednesday evening in the auditorium
of the Ann Arbor high school.
Coming from the work shops of the
Arts and Crafts society, of Detroit,
which has a reputation for its accom-
plishments in this art, the costumes
will lend a dignified and stately at-
mosphere to a well balanced program
of songs. The music will be espe-
cially fitting to the Lenten period of
the year, some of it being ecclesiasti-
cal.
Mr. Frederick Alexander will con-
duct the choir, which numbers 200.1
Tickets for the affair are on sale at
25 cents in Wahr's book store.
NEW UNITARIAN PASTOR TO
GIVE FIRST SERMON TODAY
Rev. Sidney S. Robins, the new pas-
tor who recently accepted a call to
the Unitarian church of Ann Arbor,
will preach his first sermon this morn-
ing at 10:30 o'clock in the Unitarian
church. The subjetc of his sermon
will be "The New Incarnation."
Mr. Robins first visited Ann Arbor
on February 7, 1917. At that time he
was given a banquet in the social
rooms of the church. A few days
later he was given a call to the local
church which he accepted.

EiGI 'T PASSENGER LINERS
TO TRANSPORT U. S. TROOPS
Paris, March 15. - The German
submarine U-48 while attempting to
escape from Ferrol, Spain, last night
was chased by a destroyer and sunk,
according to a Ilavas despatch from
Madrid.
(By Associated Press)
Brussels, March 15. - German rep-
resentatives accepted Thursday the
terms laid down by the allied powers
whereby more than 3,000,000 tons of
German shipping will be turned over
to the Allies in return for provisions.
Wemyss Reads Agreement
Admiral Wemyss then read one page
of typewritten memoranda giving in
crisp sentences the terms of the Al-
lies for granting food to Germany; the
German merchant fleet to be handed
over at once, financial provisions to
be made at once, food to be delivered
at once, and to be continued until the
next harvest, or as long as Germany
abides by the terms of the agreement.
Informal Surrender
The German ships will be delivered
at various ports, those at present in
neutral harbors being handed over
there. There will be nothing in the
shape of a formal surrender. Under
the agreement the United States will
receive eight Ger'man ships which will
be ready to go to sea within four
days.
Eight Liners for U. S.
The vessels received by the Unit-
ed Sattes are to be passenger ships
on account of America's desire to use
them for the transportation of troops.
Those going to France and England
are cargo vessels in neutral ports in
South and Central America and the
Dutch East Indies.
CURATOR TO SPEAK
ON ARCHITECTURE
Two lectures of special attraction
to those who are interested in archi-
tecture and cathedrals, will be giv-
en by Mr. William H. Goodyear, cura-
tor of Fine Arts at Brooklyn museum,
at 4:15 o'clock Sunday and Monday
afternoons in the large exhibition room
of Alumni Memorial hall.
The subject of Sunday's lecture will
be "The Cathedrals and Churches of
Europe," while "Notre Dame of Par-
is" will be discussed on Monday. The
featuers of the achitecture giving op-
tical interest and variety to the me-1
dieval church will be emphasized.
NEWARK, N. ,J., CLUB MEETS;
ELECTS OFFICERS FOR YEAR
About 15 members of the Newark+
club met at 7:30 o'clock Saturday
night in Lane hall to draw up a con-+
stitution and elect officers for the
year. The club is composed of men
from Newark, N. J., and has for its
purpose; the advertising of Michigan
in their home and surrounding towns.
It is the plans of the club to accom-
plish this through newspapers cam-+
paigns and letters to their local high1
schools.i

BISHOP J. N. McCORMICK, WHO
SPEAKS TODAY AT THE ST.
ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH.
BISHOP To SPEAK ON
RELIGION OF . S. ANK
REVEREND McCORMICK TO GIVE
SECOND OF LENTEN
TALKS
Coming as the second of a series
of special Lenten lecturers under the
auspices of the Baldwin lectureship
foundation, the Rev. John N. McCor-
micd, bishop of western Michigan, will
deliver two addresses Sunday on "The
Religion of the American Soldier" at
St. Andrew's Episcopal church. He
will conduct the morning service at
10:30 o'clock, and the afternoon serv-
ice at 4:30 o'clock.
Receives Majority
In October, 1917, Bishop McCormick
left his home in Grand Rapids, go-
ing to France as the representative
of the war commission of the Epis-
copal church. Recognition of his
services there led to his promotion to
the rank of major, in which position
he was given entire charge of Red
Cross chaplains serving in hospitals
and base stations. His headquarters
were in Paris.
Gassed at Front
Gassed at the front while on duty,
Bishop McCormick returned to Amer-
ica last August with the intention of
returning to his post of duty in six
months, but the signing of the arm-
istice in November caused him to
change his plans.
SCHOOL MEN'S CLUB TO HOLD
MEETING FOR REORGANIZATION
Prof. J. B. Edmondson, of the, de-
partment of education and inspector
of high schools, will be present at
the first meeting of the year of the
School Men's club to be held at 7
o'clock Monday evening, March 17, at
the Union. The club will outline some
tentative plans for future meetings of
the organization.
This club has been successful in
past years and is organized to afford
men who expect to go out as teach-
ers next year, or later, an opportunity
to meet other men who will be in the
field, and also to hear what some ex-
perienced teachers are already doing.
FIRST PASSENGER ELEVATOR
ON CAMPUS IN NEW LIBRARY
The first passenger elevator on the
campus is to be in the new Library
building. The elevator, which is elec-
tric, will be expressly for persons go-
to the third and fourth floors, and
from ten minutes to the hour till five
minutes after, it will be exclusively
for them. Ten people can be carried
at one time in it.

UNIVERSITY HEAD
POSIT/ON HAS NOT6
YET BEEN FILLED
RUMORED THAT' PROF. ANGLL OF
CHICAGO 15 BEING
CONSIDERED
MATTER UNSETTLED
SAYS PRES. HUTCHINS
Nothing Definite Can Be Announced
at Present Time, States
Retiring President
Prof. James Rowland Angell, dean
of the College of Literature, Science,
and the Arts of the University of
Chicago, has not as yet accepted the
position.
President Harry B. Hutchins, who
returned from Chicago Saturday night,
stated that things were unsettled con-
cerning the matter, and nothing deft-
nte col .Abeannounced at the pres-
ent time.
Dr. Angell a Micigan Man
Dr. Angell is a Michigan man of the
class of '90, and while a student at
the University was a member of Phi
Beta Kappa and Sigma Zsi. As a
post graduate, he received the degree
of master of arts and in 1892 was the
recipient of the same degree from
Harvard. The following year the
University of Berlin and the Univer-
sity of Halle conferred the honor de-
gree upon him.
He has held the position of director
of the psychological laboratory at Min-
nesota and the head of a like literary
department at the University of Chi-
cago. At present he is dean of the
literary department and professor of
psychology at Chicago university.
Son of Former President
Professor Angell is a son of the late
president of the University of Michi-
gan, Dr. James Burrill Angell, and a
brother of Judge Alexis C. Angell, of
Detroit.
OLD-FASHION SING
PLANS COMPLETED
With Mr. N. C. Fetter acting as
singing master and Mrs. G. B. Rhead
as accompanist, the Women's society
of the Baptist church will conduct an
old fashion singing school at 8 o'clock
Monday night in Lane hall.
Among the list of solists for the
school will be Miss Nora Hunt, Mrs.
G. D. Caton, S. E. Field, grad, Mr.
H. D. Allmendinger, Mrs. C. E. Wil-
son, Mr. L. D. Wines, Mrs. F. Wil-
kinson, Winona Beckley, '19, and Mr.
E. Martin.
The solists will use old-fashioned
costumes, and the music will tend
toward the old school type, including
both serious and humorous groups.
THREE PROFESSORS TO SPEAK
AT FRESH ENGINEER SMOKER
Tickets for the fresh engineers'
smoker, to be held at 7:30 o'clock
Tgesday, March 18, at the Michigan
Union, are selling at a rate which
denotes great interest in the event on
the part of the prospective engineers.
With speeches by Assistant Dean
W. -. Butts, Prof. L. M. Gram and
Professor C. E. Love on the program,
a profitable evening is promised, while
music by a jazz orchestra will tend to
add pep to the occasion.

DIRECTORY LIST SUSPENDED
Owing to unavoidable condi-
tions. The Daily is not print-
ing in this issue a supplement to
the Student Directory. It will
be continued in Tuesday morn-
ing's Daily.

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
fo:3o, Leonard A. Barrett speaks
. Theme, "Vital or Xlechanical Religion'.
Noon, Prof T. E. Rankin speaks to Students
6:30, Young People s Evening Serbic
Students Cordially Welcomed.

Ur.

TONIGHT II

7:30 O'CLOCK
HILL

Rabbi Nathan Krass of the Central Temple, New York City
UNION SERVICE
Subject, "The Reconstruction of Religion" Auspices of Jewish Students' Congregation
Music by Temple Beth El Choir, William Howland, Director

7:30 O'CLOCK
HILL
Auditorium

orium

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