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October 13, 1918 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

lation. What has become of the
kaiser was the question asked on ev-

isfON

L

inued from Page One)
incere, to Ask Allies
'resident Wilson finally de-
there is enough sincerity
y's proposition to transmit
allies, as the German chan-
ested, it should be born in
Great Britain, France and
Entente nations must be
consideration for discision
her an armistice should be
r whether decisions should
ken to carry out the details
it Wilson's peace terms.
,test danger facing the peo-
United States, officials said
ht, was that they might
ider Germany's propositions
onditional surrender as the
ants demand and relax their
continue until victory is at
un Reply Puzzling
ial Washington was at a
ost to understand the text
e becoming public in this
;her the state department
riss legation which is look-
German interests had re--
reply.
there was no effort to
-authenticity and the diplo-
Nhom the dispatch was sent
express regret the dispatch
nade public.
reading it would seem that
ad to peace. The one point
ared to loom up as the text
official copy was read is
hancellor Maximillian and
appointed foreign secretary,
i reality represent the Ger-
,as the reply declares they
Ie Kaiser Lost Powerl
through the phrases of the'
ext everyone here immed-
strucek with the question
ust have happened in Ger-
ntly to make such an ans-
le.
Le closing phases which de-
the present German gov-
as been formed by confer-
reement with the great ma-
Lie reichstag and that the
seeks peace in the name
nan government and of the
ple was regarded as being
to almost unlimited circu-

ery hand. The world knows very lit-
tle of what has been going on in Ger-
many during the last few months.
With her armies steadily beaten at
the front, things at home have been
going from bad to worse. It was re-
garded that it is not in the realm of
probablility that the great power of
the kaiser, who brought on the war,
has been taken away from him.
EIGHT MEN LEAVE
FOR CAMP HANCOCK
Eight men left Ann Arbor on the
5 o'clock train yesterday for a ma-
chine gun training camp at Camp
Hancock, Georgia. This is the sec-
ond detachment to leave Ann Arbor.
The names of the candidates are as
follows: Hains Ely Elison, John Cor-
nelius Gilbert, Ross Nelson Baxter,
Charles Stuart Thorsch, Leonard
Jacque Drye, John Wilson Rousell,
Hubart Nicholas Lenotte, James
Henry.
A detachment of (heavy artillery
men and a detachment of machine
gunners have already gone, and it is
expected to see quite a number of
infantry men go in the near future.
S. A. T. C. SCHEDULE FOR
WEEK OF OCTOBER 14
Beginning Monday there will be
be regular drill from 2:30 to 4:30
o'clock Monday, Tuesday, Thurs-
day, and Friday. On Wednes-
day the same period will be de-
voted to theoretical instruction.
The subject which will be dis-
cussed on Monday and Tuesday is
"Drills on Military Courtesy."
(Non-com. Manual, Sec. 2, 3, 4,
5.) Thursday's subject is "Dis-
cipline" and Friday's is "Physical
Hardihood" with two ten-minute
periods each of close order and \
physical drill with games.
The subject matter for Wednes-
day's discussion can be found in
the I. D. R., Par. 62-74, 100-113,
116-133, Military Courtesy (Non-
Com. Manual Sec. 2, 3, 4, 5, 8.)
Military Correspondence (See
Moss' Paper Work, Sec. 887-908
and General Military Information
upon which questions may be
asked. There will be inspection
Saturday at 10:30 o'clock.

CHURCHES AND SHOWS
TO STAY OPEN TODAY
(Continued from Page One)
in attendance at public gatherings,
however, such as those contemplated
by the state authorities for churches,
theaters and similar meetings, have
been in rigid effect during the last
week in Ann Arbor, so far as the S.
A. T. C. is concerned. Members of
the corps are not subject to the at-
tendance records kept by the Uni-'
versity authorities. Their record- is
kept at regimental headquarters.
Only 15 Cases Among Women
Less than 15 cases of influenza have
been reported among women students
of the University. Of this number,
four were in Martha Cook building,
but inasmuch as this dormitory houses
117 girls, the percentage is regarded
as small. As quickly as symptoms
appear, the patient is isolated in her
room and a trained nurse is provided
her. No general precautionary meas-
ures are insisted upon, althongh the
majority of residents use antiseptic
sprays and gargles, and are careful to
keep themselves in the best of health.
In both Martha Cook building and
Newberry residence, the officials are
emphatic in observing the adage that
an ounce of prevention is worth a
pound of cure, and sufficient amounts
of rest and outdoor exercise have been
made the rule.
Among the sororities, the Pi Beta
Phi house is thus far the only one
from which patients have been re-
ported for influenza. Three mem-
bers from the sorority have been sent
to the hospital ,and two others were
recently sent home to convalesce from
slight attacks of the disease. Accord-
ing to physicians' reports, the six or
eight cases which are now being car-
ed for at the University hospital are
very mild, and miay be classified as
colds rather than as Spanish influenza.
S. A. T. C. MEN
ATTENTION
If you subscribed for The
Daily before you were assigned
to barracks, you should report
your address to the circulation
department immediately.

MAJOR BULLARD COMMANDS
SECOND U. S. ARMY
(Continued from Page One)
whole line north of Lille into Flan-
ders, and the Germans are worried
also over the prospects over General
Clumer's second army and King Al-
bert's Belgium forces on their right
flank above Lille, springing into new
activities.
Petain's Army Threatens Hun
In the south Petain's army and the
A4iericans under General Pershing
have struck renewed heavy blows
against the German left in the great
pocket formed by the Germans from
Verdun, around the Laon curve to the
sea. The Chemin-des-Dames no long-
er stands as a bulwark for Laon in
the Aisne region, and to the east and
the Champagne the French, by a
swift advance of from three to four
miles, in a day, have entered Vouziers
and carried their line so far north
that the communication between the
German northern armies and those
east of the Champagne bid fair to be
cut.
On the extreme Allied right in the
Estrees battle area the American
army is keeping up its hammering tac-
tics and daily gaining more of the
most valuable ground remaining to
the Germans in northern France, that
protecting their communication lines
from the home soil through theMetz
and Mont Nedy regions.
Teutons Not Yet in Rout
But tihe Germans, although they
are in general on the retreat, are by
no means yet in a state of broken re-
sistance. This is shown by the des-
perate fight they are giving the Amer-
icans from the Argonne to the Meuse,
by the stand they appear about to
make before Valenciennes, and by the
persistance with which they are cling-
ing to their positions around Laon,
although doubtless aware of the peril
through which they are exposing their
line forces in this area by so doing.
Douai, and perhaps Lille, they seem
to have prepared themselves to give
up. But they are still throwing every-
thing they can possibly mass into the
effort to keep their vital left flank
north of the Verdun area protected.
New classes in Shorthand and Type-
writing formed Monday, October 14, at
The School of Shorthand, 711 N. Uni-
versity Ave.-Adv.
You will always find satisfaction by
adveritsing in the Daily.-Adv.

{
J

CARUSO TO SING PATRIOTIC . Shadow Dance, from "Dinorah,"
SONGS IN CONCERT HERE. ...................... Meyerbe
--Nina Morgana
The program in full is as follows: Aria, "Vesti La' Giubba," from
Souvenir de Moscow .....Wienlawski: Pagliacco . ..........Leoncaval
Elias Breeskin Enrico Caruso
Cavatina, "Come per me sereno," "The Star Spangled Banner" ....
from Sonnambula ........Bellini. ..........Francis Scott K
Nina Morgana Enrico Caruso and Nina Morgana
Aria, "Celeste Aida," from Aida, Verdi
G~rin !4ttlAAN'A UT A rI "., 1rW,7W Lt ffAlV3mAV

Enrico uaruso
Caprice Espagnolo......Chaminade
Zapatc'ado .......... ... . Sarasate
Elias Breeskin
He Loves Me ............Chadwick
The Wee Butterfly......Mana Zucca
Summer...............Chaminade
Nina Morgana
Aria, "Una Furtiva Lagrima,"
from L'Elisir D'Amore. .Donizetti
Enrico Caruso
Intermission
Gypsy Airs...............Sarasate
Elias Breeskin

AANN AK, OR STILL bROUT OF
ITS LOAN QUOTA BY $27
It was reported late last eve
that 205 subscriptions for the Fo
Liberty Loan were received ye
day. The subscriptions amounte
$16,000, of which $250 was subsc:
by students; $275,000 of the q
for this district remains to be ra
There will probably be personal
licitations this week.
Daily advertising is profitable.--

BUY YOUR

BOOKS and SUPPLIES

- AT

I SHEEHAN'S
ARMY- AND NAVY BOOK STORE

COMPLETE

LINE OF

HOSPITAL and

LAW COATS

*

WADHAMS & CO.

MAIN ST.

t0

STATE

0 0* 090

IVE

STAR

CONCERTS

FIVE

CARUSO-HIMSELF, assisted by NINA MORGANA, Prima Donna,

Soprano

Metropolitan Opera; ELIAS BREESKIN, Distinguished Russian Violinist, SALVATORE
FUCITO and ISAAC VANGROVE, Pianists
HILL AUDITORIUM, Ann Arbor

I1

ALL CONCERTS CHANGED TO SATURDAY NIGHTS
a ni o m I IIIllllllin l . - m m

LEOPOLD GODOWSKY

ANNA CASE

ENRICO CARUSO
SATURDAY, OCT. 19

TOSCHA SEIDEL
SATURDAY, FEB.8

JOSEPH BONNET
SATURDAY, JAN.18

SATURDAY, DEC.14

SATURDAY, NOV.16

CARUSO Ticket Sales Begins at 8 o'clock SATURDAY MORNING at SCHOOL OF MUSIC '

$2.50

- $3.50

- $4.00

- $5.00

SOME GOOD COURSE TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE AT $4.50, $5.00, $5.50, $6,00 INCLUDING CARUSO CONCERT
NR. CARUSO USES THE HARDMAN PIANO EXCLUSIVELY. TOUR UNDER TH E DIRECTION OF THE METROPOITAN XUSICAL BUREAU, NEW YORK CITY

rr

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