100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 14, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDA MARC

ut gttn ttilg

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGANH
Published every morning except Monday
during the university year by the Board in
Control of Student ublications.
MI'EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
%o the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
n this paper and also the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice-at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.5o.
Offices : Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words,
dt signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
pear in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
notices of events will be published in The
Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
consideration. No manuscript will be re-
turned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
sentiments expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Clarence Roeser ...........Managing Editor

C. L. Jackson........ ....City
arry M. Carey...... .....News
uce Millar........eerp
ilton Marx............Associate
iomas F. McAllister.......Featurer
avid B. Landis.............. Sport
arguerite Clark..........Women's.
artha Guernsey..........Women's

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

Kendrick Kimball.......Guillotine-Editor
Charles R. Osius, Jr..........State Editor
Mark K. IEhlbert............ Efficiency Editor
Paul A. Shinkman.........Dramatic Editor
Ruth Dailey ............Exchange Editor
ISSUE EDITORS
Herbert R. Slusser Paul G. Weber
Renaud Sherwood Edgar L. Rice
William Clarkson 1. D. Ylintermann
HlughV. Hitchcock J. I. hart
REPORTE RS
Marie Crozier Muriel E. Bauman
E0dna Apel Robert E. Swart
Trhomas If. Adams .John F,. McManis
Richard B. Marshall C. H. Murchison
Irene Ellis Mary D, Lane

,,+, .

C. S. Baxter

BUSINESS STAFF
Harold Makinson.........Business Manager
Agnes L. Abele.... Asst Business Manager
LeGrand A. Gaines....Asst. Business Manager
Win. M. Lfevre... .Asst. Business Manager
W"; A.- eitzinger. Asst. Business Manager
Donald M. Major.Asst. Business Manager
".Donnell R. Schoffner. .Asst. Business Manager
SENIOR STAFF
Mark B. Covell E;ward Prhs, Jr.
Robert 4. McKean Henry Whiting I
George A. Cadwell
JUNIOR STAFF
Curt '. Schneider Isabelle Farnuin
liarol P. Lindsay Duane Miller
Maynard A. Newton Geo. R. Strimbeck, Jr.
R. A. Sullivan
FRIDAY, MARCH 14, 1919.
Issue Editor-E. D. Flintermann
BRING OUT THE FRESHMEN
Only 70 freshmen have signified
their intention of entering the All-
fresh track meet to be held Satur-
day. Considering the size of the class,
this is an exceedingly small nu'mber.
A much larger crowd was expected to
turn out, and a much larger one
should.
Many fraternitie's have taken it upon
themselves to send their freshmen to
the meet, and have offered prizes for
the winners. This is an example that
all fraternities should follow, and in
fact all upperclassmen. If every up-
perclassman would send one freshman
to the meet, the size of the turnout
should satisfy every expectation.
If freshen are lax in affairs regard-
ing their class, upperclassmen are neg-
ligent in acquainting them with the
various activities and trad'tions that
make. for such a large part of college
life.
Upperclassmen, bring out the fresh-
men!
DRAMATICS AT MICHIGAN
The lack of organized dramtic ac-
tivities at Michigan has often been
felt. The various organizations that
produce plays of one kind or another
-rely on a small circle of their own
particular admirers for their support
There is no general interest taken by
the campus at large. The Union
opera of course is an exception, and
not to be classed with dramatics as
such.
There is no reason for this apparent
lack of interest on *the part of the
campus. Everyene likes dramatics
more or less, and the proper spirit of
enthusiasm is ready to be brought
out, if the proper means are taken.
A plan suggested last year, but not
put into effect because of the unset-
tled conditions, provided for a com-
mittee on student entertainments,
whose main functions were to act in
an advisory capacity to all dramatic
activities, arranging the dates of pro-
ductions, the amount of money to be
spent, the selections of plays, and
so on.
This is a step in the right direc-
tion. The formation of such a com-
mittee would tend to bring into closer
co-operation and harmony the differ-
ent dramatic societies on the campus.
A separate dramatic department seems
impossible at present, but some sort of
organized attempt to interest the stu-
dents at large, together with the va-
rious courses given on the subject,
ought to raise dramatics to a, most
important place at Michigan.

The Guillotine
I Met Her on the Beach at Waikiki
(A Drama, Soulful and Gushing, from
the Life of One Horace Sweeney)
Beach scene; Hulas, mosquitoes,
palm trees and lettuce sandwiches. in
the background. Wild waves in fore.
ground, unchaperoned.
I wandered lonely as a cloud'
Upon the golden shore,
I left behind the maddening crowd
To hear the breakers roar.
Ah-near me on the foamy beach
A maiden fair I spied,
Her face was like a ripened peach,
es, soft and dewy eyed.
She passed me near, I felt a fear,
A goddess of the sea?
My breath then stopped, my pulse it
dropped,
Ye Gods! She winked at me.
My erring heart then stopped a dart
For Cupid laid me low,
Upon the beach I made this speech,
My voice it quavered so.
Soft music, flying fshes and fiddler
crabs playing in the offing.
'As golden beaches break the wave
You dear, could break my heart,
So let me be thy humble slave
And never shall we part."
"No. No," said she "'Tis growing
late.
Wed thee? Not se soon.
For several months please let me wait,
I'll be thy bride in June."
Much pIanissimo, green light, bull'
frogs, fire flies and sand fleas.
The moon had set, a watching star
Alone patrolled the sky,
I held her hand and missed my car,
We finally said "Goodbye."
And as I left her at the gate,
She murmured softly, "I will wait."
Rapid transition of scene. At this
juncture the audience will please arise
and sing "God Save the Queen" while
the orchestra plays.
Some two weeks later, a request,
By quite a social light,g ,
To visit him and be his guest,
To dine and dance that night.
To state exactly how I felt
I really am unable,
Oh, fate had kindly with me dealt.
SHE WAITED ON THE TABLE.
Yes, dear reader, we did it with our
little hatchet.
Today the Senior Engineer asked if
John Bunyan invented the corn plas-
ter t speed the Pilgrim's Progress.
Why. St. Cecilia Didn't Soar
(From the Lapeer Bee . Keeper's
Journal)
Miss Flora Murphy, the celebrated
bella donna of the Redpath circuit,
gave a concert at the Lady Eagles'
hall last evening. Unfortunately, dur-
ing her rendition of Mendelbaum's
rhapsody in F the spot light reflected
into her eyes from the bald head of
the flute player and she was unable
to read the notes. A fine time was
had by all those present.
There's a Reason
'I am worried," said the barber, "I
Have lost my merry song;
So many people shave themselves
I barely scrape along.
To dodge the cost of living high
It takes a keener blade than I."
Our Daily Novelette
Binks-"What are those dark spots
on the top of Professor Bunkum's bald
head"
Jinks-"Modern economy, that's all.
There's where his wife figures up the
grocery bills."

Famous Cl1slng Lines
"Hard work always results in suc-
cess," said Mary Ann McCarthy as

she pressed her hand to her brow.
"Ha, it's clammy."
LOUIS XVI.
Wtomen I
The senior-junior basketball game
to be played at 4 o'clock Firday aft-
ernoon will furnish entertainment for
the Women's league party which will
be held at that time in Barbour gym-
nasium.
The board of directors of the Wom-
en's leageu will meet at 9 o'clock Sat-
urday morning in Barbour gymna-
sium.
Girls who want swimming lessons
should register on the chart posted
in Barbour gymansium.
Dancing- will follow the basketball
game between the juniors and seniors
Friday afternoon, in Barbour gymna-
sium.
FREE PICTURES IN LANE HALL
SATURDAY - "Y" AUSPICES
Two hours of "reel" delight await
students at the free University "Y"
picture show to be held at 8 o'clock
Saturday night in Lane hall. "Good for
Nothing," starring Carlyle Blackwell,
and "The World Today," will be
shown.
Students read The Daily.-Adv.

Snow

(Beautiful Fairy Story)
METHODIST CHURCH

Loose Leaf Note Book

don't stop short of the

SATURDAY,

7:30

"Standard"-- It positively has no equal-Alsizes,

i
. .r.... srrr ',

and everyone guaranteed.

TO

AMEND CONSTITUTION AT
WOMEN'S LEAGUE MEETING

Principal C'range to Be Institution of
Automatic Membership in
League
Amendcents to the constitution of
the Women's league will be submitted
at the annuel meeting of the Wom-
en's league, April 18. A committee
composed of Dean Myra B. Jordan,
Registrar Arthur G. Hall; Doris Mc-
Donald, '19, Katherine Kilpatrick, '19,
and Esther Pafenbach, '21, met yester-
day afternoon in Registrar Hall's of-
fice to formulate the changes.
The present constitution of the
league was adopted in 1916. The prin-
cipal change to be made will concern
automati membership, whilch has been
granted the league since that time.
Miss Glen White of Joliet, Ill., has
the distinction of having thrown a
baseball farther than any other wom-
an. Her record is 224 feet, eight
inches.

WAHRS

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

p
For Traveling AnywhereAntm
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASK US
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 . Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)
Correctness in the writing paper you use reflects your
good taste,
La Fayette Blue Stationery
is charming, correct and smart.

I

Marguerite Clark

THE "STANDARD Stands Alone

;.I

MICHIGAN TAILORING COMPANY
901 N. University Ave. Cor. N. Univ., and Ingals, Opposite Hill Auditorium
SPRING AND SUMMER SUITS
$18 to $50 Goods nolp on display
LADIES' DEPARTMENT
entire second floor for Dressmaking and Fine Tailoring. A Solution
for cleaning Fur Coats of the best quality at a reasonable price. Try
this new oderiess solution for taking the SHINE out of your suits.
As a trial wemwill only charge you half price. Guaranteed by one of
the leading firms of Chicago, Ill. We will call for your goods over
Phone 2734-W.
We buy yqur discarded suits
Cleaning and Pressing at reasonable prices
Open 7:30 a. m. to 9 p. m.
W. L. SLEDGE, Proprietor

IN

When purchasing a

White"

Charles W Graham
Successor to Sheehan & Co.

1J

Come On Dad
Watohfor flat. of Ticket Sala

ICampus Lunch

I

Vernors Ginger ale
on Draught

000el df oa

I

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
Shorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping

Deli ghtful Spring

Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.

9Villinery

NYodes

Including

Hand made
and Pattern

0
.
, r
ti
,d'
t
t'

Assortments
Well-varied

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbot and jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:1o a.
mn., and hourly to 9:xo p. in.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to. 9:48 p. im. (Ex.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. ., and
every two hours to 9:o5 p. in., io :go p. M.
To Ypsilanti only, zir:45 p. m., 12:20 a. M.
i:io a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti,
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. tn., to
12:2o a. im.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. n. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620.R
14 S.. State St. Ann Arbox

in Style

COLLEGIATE EDITORIALS

Hats

and Color

ARE WE SELF-CENTERED?
(From the Minnesota Daily.)
In these days of reconstruction and
general waking up, let us not allow
universities to slip through the mill
unground. It would be humiliating to
discover a few years hence that we
were precisely where we had been be-
fore the great war. A recent conver-
sation reveals a condition which, if
true, should be remedied: "I am
surprised at the narrowness which I
fid among university students. I
ha, come in contact with many, and
am ,oth shocked and disgusted to see
that th', breadth of their thoughts in-
cludes only affairs of the campus."
Can this be true? Are we allowing
the fact that M-was at the theater
last night with IL-s' fiance to over-
shadow the starvation of hundreds in
Europe? Or the formation, or failure
of a formation, of a Russian democ-
racy to be lost to view in the tremen-
dous tragedy of not getting a bid to
the next dance? Are our thoughts
hemmed in by the boundaries of the
university gates?

11-

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources.........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

i

In our millinery salons will be found smart hats for all-occasions. Especially
at the present time, are we well supplied with tailored hats-the kinds which
college women want for wear with tailored suits.
Our hats for dress wear are also worthy of special attention, but whether for
street or dress wear, our patrons will find that distinctiveness is the subtle qual-
ity which distinguishes Mack hats from the mass of the ordinary.

I

O.-D. MORRILL
Typewillers
'typewriting
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Nickls Aroade Phe 1718
First Floor

Priced from $5 up

p.

F,

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan