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March 14, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-14

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THE WEATHER
SNOW AN) COLDER
T DAY

EmAOF e Ap 410
AlfN 0
t

~aiti

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AM) NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 114. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAYy MARCH 14, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

SEES DEMAND FOR
HOSPITA SOCIAL
SERVICE WORKERS
WORK INTERESTING; INCLUDES
READING, LETTER WRITING
AND TEACHING
TEACHING ANDAMUSING
CHILDREN ON PROGRAM
Miss Meriwether, University Hospital
" Worker, Issues Call for 75
Helpers
Volunteers are needed by the social
service department of the University
hospital. There are 75 workers in
this department at present, but as
many more are needed at once, ac-
cording to Miss Mary C. Meriwether,
social service director at the hospi-
tal.
The volunteers offer to work a
certain number of hours each week
and are given assignments for the
days and hours they choose. The work
consists of "furnishing the children
with -recreation and instruction, as
well as writing letters, distributing
boks, and oing shopping for adult pa-
books, and doing, shopping for adult
Children Must Be Taught
There are usually between 40 and
50 children at the hospital and all of
these who are able are given instruc-
tion in elementary subjects. This is
necessary as a few of them are at the
hospital for a year or even more and
unless taught primary subjects they
Gould lie so far behind in their class-
es as to be discouraged.
Many Needed for Work
The children must also be furnished
with amusements. These consist of
games, story-telling, and an occasion-
al trip to the movies. As each volun-
teer can devote only a few hours a
week to the work, a large number are
needed to supply all the children with
the necessary instruction and diver-
sion.
Help Adults Also
The work which must be done for
the adults is as varied as that for the
children. Many of the adult patients
are too ill to write or are foreigners
who do not know the English lan-
(Continued on Page Six)
GLEE CLUB ASSURED BY
NUMEROUS NEW TRYOUTS
Michigan makes good again!
Doubt as to the possibility of a
Glee club this year was completely
routed when over 40 men turned out
for the tryouts held Thursday night
at Theodore Harrison's studio in the
University School of Music. Out of
this number there were a sufficient
number of the much needed first ten-
ors to assure the success of the club.
Names of the successful candidates
will be published in the Daily once
the eligibility committee has passed
on the men selected.
Mr. Harrison has chosen an unus-
ual repertoire, including plantation
melodies, rag numbers, and other se-
lections of merit. Of the 60 men who
will compose the club, 30 are old men
and numerous others were members
of the All-Fresh club.
Rehearsals will start early next
week. First tenors who have not

tried out may secure a hearing either
by calling Mr. Harrison at the School
of Music or at 1889.

RED CROSS WILL
WRITE REQUESTS
Discharged soldiers, sailors, Ma-
rines, S. A. T. C., and Naval unit men
who have not yet applied for their
$60 gratuity may call at the Red
Cross Home Service, 7 Nickels Ar-
cade, where application blanks and
assistance in filling them out may be
had free of charge.
The local office has also engaged a
notary public who can make out a
duplicate of the discharge papers to
be kept by the individual as a safety
measure should, the original be lost in
the mail.
It is recommended by the govern-
ment to make out the duplicates, for
should the original be lost, it would
require much time and trouble to get
another without the duplicate.
WOMAN MEDIC ELECTED,
TO HARVARD FACULTY

DI. ALICE HAMILTON, '93M,
OF SEX TO MAKE
STAFF

FIRST

' Dr. Alice Hamilton, '93M, whose ap-
pointment as assistant professor of
industrial medicine has been announc-
ed by the Harvard board of overseers,
is the first woman to be elected to a
position on the Harvard faculty.
"Dr. Hamilton is one of the bright-
est students that has ever graduated
from the University medical school,"
said Dean Victor C. Vaughan. "and
is exceedingly well fitted for the po-
sition to which she has been ap-
pointed."
Investigated Factories
Since 1910 sh'e has been investigat-
ing industrial poisons for the feder-
al department of labor. She has been
going through all the different kinds
of factories, especially those in which
chemicals are manufactured, to deter-
mine what industries are. the most
injuri~s to the health. She has made
a special study of lead poisoning,
Taught at Northwestern
From 1899 to 1902 she was professor
of bacteriology at the Woman's Med-
ical college of Northwestern univer-
sity, Chicago. Dr. Hamilton, between
1902 and 1910, held the position of bac-
teriologist at the McCormic Memorial
Institute. She has also done work with
Miss Addams at Hull House, Chicago.
UNION OPERA TICKETS
EXEMPTED FROM TAX
No war tax will be assessed on
tickets for "Come On, Dad," the Un-
ion opera, it was announced yester-
day following receipt by Prof. Ralph
W. Aigler of a telegram from the de-
partment of interior, exempting the
production from the theater tax. This
will mean a saving of 10 per cent for
everybody attending the dpera.
Professor Aigler made a special
trip to Washington last week to ob-
tain /the exemption if possible, but
could get no definite ruling. The tele-
gram yesterday, however, was the ulti-
mate result. Full announcement of the
ticket sale and prices for "Come On,
Dad," will be made in The Daily Sun-
day morning. A new method will be
used this year in distributing the
tickets.
FIVE GRADUATES APPOINTED
BY EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT
Five graduates of the University
have recived appointments from the
educational department recently. The
following are the appointments that
will be filled this semester: Ruth
Rush, '18, goes to Port Huron to teach
Latin and English; Paul Field, '16,
will conduct athletics at Alma college;
Thomas Teare, '20L, will instruct in
English at Grand Ledge; J. B. School-
land, '18, goes to Bowling Green, Ohio,
to teach Latin and English and
Charles Anderson, '18. will teach Eng-
lish at Frankfort, iadiana.
The appointment committee also lo-
cated Avis White, '19, for next year
at Royal Oak to teach English.
Mr. Stephen Scatori Back; 1l 5 Weeks
After an illness of five weeks Mr.
Stephen Scatori of the romance de-
partment has resumed his work and
will meet his classes as usual.

C1NOLEHGERESIGNS
Prof. A. B. Stevens, '75P, Resignation
Accepted Wednesday at Regents'
Board Meeting
PROMINENT PHARMACEUTICAL
CHEMIST THROUGHOUT STATE
Professor Alviso Burdett Stevens,
Dean of the college of Pharmacy,
whose resignation was accepted at the
meeting of the Board of Regents Wed-
nesday, was born at Tyrone, Living-
stone county, Michigan, June 15, 1853.
He is the son of Harvey Root and Ann
(Cale) Stevens.
He reeived his preparatory educa-
tion in the high schools of Byron and
East Saginaw, both of which are in
Michigan. When 18 he entered the Uni-
versity of Michigan and in 1875 was
graduated with the degree of Phar-
maceutical Chemist.
From 1875 to 1886 he followed the
profession of analytical chemist and
prescription pharmacist. From 1879
to 1882 he taught pharmacy in the De-
troit college of medicine. In 1886 he
was called to the University as in-
structor in pharmacy, from which, in
1890, he was advanced to the rank of
lecturer, and in 1892 to that of assist-
ant professor. In 1906 he received the
rank of junior professor.
The years 1903 to 1905 were spent
in foreign travel and study, at the end
of which time he received the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy from the Uni-
versity of Berne.
In 1912 he was made acting dean
of the College of Pharmacy and in
1917, at the death of the late Dean
Julius O. Schotterbeck was appoint-
ed dean.
Professor Stevens has served in
many positions duringhis life, among
which ae president of the Detroit
Prarmaceutical society, from 1884 to
1885, president of the Michigan State
Pharmaceutical association in 1893,
and vice-president of The American
(Continued on Page Six)
RENCHCHTEAUX IINE
ARCHITECTURAL MODES
Bil. KAHN IN LECTURE TELLS
FEATURES OF FRENCH
STRUCTURES
"Among the most beautiful examples
of the change from the Gothic to Re-
naissance periods of architecture, are
the chateaux and cathedrals of central
France," stated Mr. Albert Kahn,
prominent architect of Detroit, in a
lecture on the "Chateaux ofTourain,"
Thursday afternon in the Natural
Science lecture room.
Visits Historic Chateaux
Mr. Kahn visited many edifices in
his tour that are famous in French
history. Among the finest chateaux
was the one at Blois which has the
distinction of being owned by Louis
XVI and Queen Ann of Brittany. It
is almost pure Renaissance in design,
and is a very fine example of the
architecture of that period.
Inferior in design to Blois, and yet
having once had the proud title of be-
ing "the fairest in the land," is the
beautiful chateau of Chambard. One
of its most distinctive and pictures-
que features is a wonderful open
double staircase, so constructed that
two persons, one descending, the oth-
er ascending, would never meet.
Sees Restoration in Progress

The chateau that he desired most to
visit and inspect was Josselin, in Brit-
tany. Because of its being in a state
of restoration, no traveler had been
allowed to enter its doors for many
years. Mr. Kahn, however, was very
fortunate and succeeded in seeing and
sketching the entire interior.
Slides illustrating profusely the
chateau, were shown and portrayed
many intricate features of the designs
of exceptional gateways, balconies,
and cornices.
hun Advance Stopped in Time
"Let us be thankful," said Mr. Kahn,
"that the tide of the Hun advance was
stemmed before it could penetrate to
northern France, for much that is
fine in French architecture lies in
this part of the country. Now that the
war is over, let us hope that the French
people may be left to enjoy peace
and the beauty of their wondrous
land."

H:AS DONE PREEMINENT WORK
IN FIELD OF ECONOMICS
After an absence of three years,
Prof David Fridaywill return to the
University next fall to take charge
of the courses in money and banking
the economics department.
In the three years that Professor
Friday has been absent from the Un-
iversity, he has been in the limelight
because of his ability in economic
theory and accounting. For two years
he had charge of the graduate work in
economics theory at the University of
New York.
Recognized by Government
While conducting his classes at
New York university, Professor Fri-
day was investigating the amount of
loanable capital in the United States.
His paper on this subject won the re-
cognition of treasury officials of Wash-
ington.
Worked in Treasury
He was granted a leave of absence
by the University of New York to ac-
cept a position with the treasury de-
partment as statistical investigator.
Later, he was transferred to the post-
office department as a statistical ad-
visor on the telegraph and telephone
in the postal and telegraph adminis-
tration.'
It was only 14 years ago that Pro-
fessor Friday came to this University
as a student. On graduating he be-
came an instructor in the economics
department, and in a short time was
placed in charge of the accounting
classes.
Aided Accounting Department
For some time the officials of the
economics department had been en-
deavoring to put accounting on a
university basis, and under Professor
Friday this branch of the department
has reached its present high stand-
ard.
Great Asset to Department
Professor Friday will probably re-
tain his position at Washington until
next fall. Prof. H. C. Adams, of the
Economics department, said that the
adjunct of Professor Friday to the
faculty will greatly strengthen the
standing of that department.
SENIOR LIT CLASS ORL
TO BE COMPLETED TODAY
ADDRESSES MUST BE IN TODAY
FOR COMMENCEMENT IN-
VITATIONS
Members of the senior literary class
will have the last opportunity to af-
fix their home address opposite their
names on the class roll from 9 to 12
o'clock, Friday morning, March 14, in
the waiting room of Dean Effinger's
office. S. W. Sedgwick, '19, will be in
charge of the roll at that time.
Former System Unsatisfactory
This information is needed now in
order that the names and home ad-
dresses of all seniors may appear on
the commencement invitations. Form-
erly a complete roster of each gradu-
ating class was compiled after the
commencement exercises were over
and the graduates had left for their
homes but this system proved unsatis-
factory and entailed considerable ex-
pense which had to be covered by a
special assessment. The method now
being used does away with the addi-
tional cost and furthermore each sen-
ior will have a list of his classmates
in his possession before leaving Ann
Arbor.
Many More Come in
Up to Thursday afternoon only

silghtly more than 50 per cent of the
class had signed and Friday morning
is the ' last opportunity available to
seniors to get their addresses in. Those
who fail to do so will find only their
names appearing on the invitations.
Chance to Pay Back Dues
The senior lits will be given another
chance to pay their back dues between
9 and 12 o'clock' Friday morning in
he booth opposite the registrar's office.
The money is needed to pay for the
space which the class contracted* for
in the Michiganensian.

PROF. FRIDAY WILL
RETURN NEXT FALL

Was With
2ment in

N. Y. U.; Aided Govern.
Treasury and Postoffice
Departments

WORK OF UNIVERSITY IN
BRANCH EXPANDING
RAPIDLY

THIS

J- HOP TICKETS GO
ON SALE NEXT WEEK
J-Hop tickets will go on sale next
week, according to an announcement
made by the committee on J-Hop ar-
rangement, Thursday.
More booths than ever before in the
history of a J-Hop are expected at this
year's function as independents are
given the chance to secure the privi-
lege of having one by addressing a
petition signed by 10 men to the chair-
man of the J-Hop committee.
The committee looking after the
care of the Juniors' affair will meet
Friday afternoon to decide many im-
portant matters relevant to it. An at-
tempt will be made to have the taxi-
cab companies of the city accede to a
uniform fare, as they have in previ-
ous years.
PROF. HENDERSON TELLS
OF EXTENSION PLANS,

"Plans for the work of the Univer-
sity extension division for this year
are threefold," said Prof. W. D. Hen-
derson Thursday. Coincident to the
acceptance of President Harry B.
Hutchins' resignation, Professor Hen-
derson was relieved of teaching in the
physics department as associate pro-
fessor and made director of the Uni-
versity etxension service with the ti-
tle of professor.
To Include More Cities
"In the department of credit of the
University extension service, courses
are at present conducted in Detroit,
Flint, Saginaw, and Jackson, with a
total registration of nearly 400 stu-
dents," he said. "It is planned to
place these extension credit courses
in more cities; possibly Bay City,
Grand Rapids, and Battle Creek.
"The department of extension has
conducted 1,500 to 1,800 lectures be-
fore an average audience of 250 per-
sons since the work began six years
ago. There will be a general revi-
sion of the subjects delivered in these
lectures in order to present topics
touching upon modern conditions and
of current interest to all.
Library Division Important
The University extension division
consists of 12 departments. In ad-
dition totthe ones mentionedaabove
seine of the more important are the
department of library rextension and
that of debating and public speaking.
The library extension service was
organized three years ago with Miss
Edith Thomas in charge. Its object
is to furnish to high schools, clubs,
and other organizations high grade
and up to date material relating to
modern questions.
Debating 'League Is Feature
One of the most recent develop-
ments of the extension service is the
establishment of a high school debat-
ing league with Mr. Ray K. Immel of
the oratory department as state man-
ager. The plan of the league Is to
divide the state into districts in
which the high schols all de-
bate the same questions, The two
winning high school teams are then
brought to Ann Arbor to hold the final
debate there.
STUDENT COUNCIL
PLANS NEW SCHEME
Leases governing the contracts of
rented rooms should be issued to stu-
dents and landlords, was the decision
of the Student council, reached at
their meeting Thursday evening. The
proposition will be presented to the
University Senate, and if approved
will becore a University ruling. The
question was raised because of the
too frequent disputes arising between
students and landlords over the ver-
bal agreements reached in regard to
rooms rented about the campus.
Permission was granted to the Ju-
nior Class to hold their annual J-Hop.
A committee was appointed to con-
fer with the members of the J-Hop
committee regarding general plans.
The Michigan Union Opera and
dates were approved, as was likewise
their trip, subject to the approval of
the University Senate.
The Council is to hold a mass meet-
ing in Hill auditorium in the near
future. As yet, the exact date has
not been announced.

PRESIDENT WILSON
NS LEAVESFOR PAIS
CONFERENCE PARTY TO REACH
CAPITAL BY NOON
FRIDAY
MAPS OUT PEACE WORK
ON LAST LAP OF VOYAGE
"Great Democrat," Fully Recovered
from Cold and Fatigue, Ready
to Take Up Tasks
(By Associated Press)
London, March 13. - A resolution
warmly 'Welcoming the draft of a
League of Nations covenant as sub-
mitted to the peace conference was
adopted today by the League of Na-
tions union.
Brest, March 13.-President Wilson
and the party which came with him
from the United States left Brest for
Paris today.
The George Washington reached this
port at 7:45 o'clock and the President
and Mrs. Wilson disembarked at 9:45.
They expect to reach Paris tomor-
row noon after a' leisurely railway
trip.
Plans Work
The President spent several hours
today and during the last of his voy-
age from the United States, mapping
out his plans for his peace conference'
work. .During the day the President
received a wireless despatch outlining
the situation with regards to the
phases of the negotiations which are
to come up soon after his arrival in
Paris.
Fully Rested
The voyage has been of great ben-
efit to President Wilson, who has
obeyed the injunctions of Rear Ad-
miral Grayson, his personal, physician,
stated. The President has entirely re-
covered from the cold from which he
had been suffering and also the
fatigue resulting from his hurried trip
to Washington, and is in vigorous con-
dition and ready to take up the tasks
awaiting him.
NEW SUMMER SCHOOL
PAMPHLETNOW READY
"Tihe world needs trained #men and
women as never before. Grave prob-
lems confront us-problems that call
or trained constructive ability of a high
order. For the great work of'the fut-
ure, which will necessarily fall to the
youth of today, ample preparation
should be made. And then, too, we
should never lose sight of the fact that
inan educated citizenship lies the
safety of the republic." 'This is he
forewomrd of President Harry B. Hutch-
ins in the printed announcement of
the summer session which appeared
this week in pamphlet form.
Although abridged in form, the an-
nouncement is illustrated with cuts
of the University buildings and sampus
views. It contains the calendar of the
session, general information regarding
the admission, registration, and the
University. A summary of the courses,
offered in the various colleges is also
pr'inted.
At present the announcements are
obtainable only at the office of the
summer' session and at the registrar's'

office. Within a short time, however.
they may be secured at the offices of
all the colleges in addition to the
places mentioned above.
President Hutchins Leaves for Chicago
President Harry B. Hutchins will
leave Friday morning for. Chicago,
where he will spend two days set-
tling private business affairs.

NO SONGS-NO DIPLOMA
If you can't give the first verse
of "The Star Spangled Banner,"
all of "America," and Joacquin
Miller's poem, "Columbus," you
can't graduate from the public
schools of Michigan, accordipg
to an order which has been is-
sued by State Superintendent of
Public Instruction Fred L. Keel-
er.
Pamphlets covering the life of
Christopher Columbus are being
distributed to all the schools
throughout the state. Questions
on the discovery of'America will
be asked on the eight grade ex-
aminations this year.

PROF. BABBITT TO LECTURE
Prof. Babbitt of Harvard Uni-
vrsity, author of "The New
Lacoon," will give a lecture at
4:15 o'clock, Friday afternoon yin
the Natural Science auditorium.
Professor Babbitt is aso the au-
thor of "Masters of French Crit-
icism," and has written many ar-
ticles for the literary magazines.

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