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March 12, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PA

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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EMERY STARS IN
ILLINOIS CONTEST

Michigan Gridiron Sponsors Many
Stars Since Games Arrival In 186

Suckers Puzzle Wolverines
Cross Court Pass at Start
of Game

with

RYCHENER SHOOTS 5 BASKETS;
QUINTETS FIGHT TO FINISH
Champaign, Ill., March 10.-Michi-
gan's victory over Illinois by the score
of 22-18 last evening came as a sur-
prise to many of the followers of the
game here, and until the WolverinesE
had solved the cross court pass with
which the Illini started the battle it
appeared that the expectations of the
Urbana fans were about to be ful-
filled.
It appears that Coach Mitchell's
team had never before experienced
this style of game and the Suckers
went immediately into the lead and
held it until the middle of the first
period. By this time the novelty wore
off for the visitors and from then un-
til the final blow of the whistle, Micll-
igan entirely outplayed Illinois.
Game Hard Fought
The score of 22 to 18 indicates how
hard fought the game was. Both sides
were playing on the defensive and
many fouls were made. Karpus, the
little Wolverine forward, had to leave
the fight after having four personals
marked against him. Captain Emery
took his place.
Emery, who it is understood has
played but little so far this year, hav-
ing just recently returned from the
service, put up the star exhibition of
the evening after once getting in. His
guarding, although he was playing one
of the forwards, helped materially in
keeping the score low. He appeared
to be all over the floor at once and was
on his opponents immediately upon
their getting possession of the ball.
Clean Sweep Expected
Rychener also had a good evening.
Shooting baskets from the middle of
the floor he continually found the
hoop and was the biggest factor in the
Michigan scoring.
The Wolverine team left for Bloom-
ington, Ind., this morning, where they
will play their final gffne of the sea-
son this evening. Coach Mitchell's
basketeers should' have no trouble in
making their final trip a clean sweep.
This defeat places Illinois in fifth
place and gives Michigan a chace to
tie Northwestern for third. If the
game this evening is lost by the Ann
Arbor team it is assured of the fourth
position with a percentage of .500.
Plays Better Basketball
The difference in the playing of the
Wolverine basketball team this year
and the quintet of last year was very
apparent. This season's five is a real
basket team and is an extraordinary
example of what Michigan can do in
athletics. Entering the Conference
last fall, the Maize and Blue produced
the first of their court aggregations
during the winter. As was to be ex-
pected they finished the season in last
place.
The dope this year pointed to their
winning a few games but it was not
generally believed that they would
finish higher than the second divi-
sion. Although at the start of the
season they were playing all teams,
including at that tmie the unbeaten
Maroons, to close scores and occa-
sionally winning a game, the Wol-
verines did not appear to be candi-
dates for any of the first four places.
Illinos Surprised
When Illinois played them on their
own court, the Suckers outplayed them
and won although Michigan did make
a brilliant finish. The improvement of
the quintet between the time of this
game and the one of last evening was
great and the membrs of the Urbana
five were not prepared for what they
met. It was a case of overconfidence.
Homerun Baker Jumps to Independent
Frank Baker's jump to the indepen-

dent Upland club leaves Miller Hug-
gins, the Yankee manager, in a bad
way., The heavy batting third base-
man left at a critical time for the
New York team because the keystone
sack is also vacant. Derrel Pratt,
who filled that position last year,
claims 'that he has quit professional
ball for good.
Baker says he is through with ma-
Jor league ball, but who can say?
He pulled the same gag the last time
he went to Upland, unceremoniously,

Football, at the/ University of Mich-
igan, is about a decade younger thanJ
baseball, which started in 1863. The
game was first introduced here by
Judge Wayne Hayman, Benjamin T.
Cable, 1). N. De Tarr, and a few oth-
ers.
When the game -was first played
here a small round rubber ball was
used. Later when Mr. Cable return-
ed from Germany he brought with
him a leather covered inflated ball
which was at that time quite a nov-
elty.,
At first the eleven man game was
not played but the English Rugby
type, in which each team is composed
of 15 men.
Unlike baseball, the first team we

met was an out of state squad, Racine
college from Wisconsin. In 1881 we
met Harvard for the first time in
which contest we were defated by a
score of 4 to 0. Since then Michigan
has played Harvard three games.
Since 1900 the cords made by Mich-
igan elevens have had no equals in.
the country. This has been due great-
ly to the coaching of Hurry-Up Yost,
who has been. with the Michigan squad
now for 18 seasons. Each year he has
made the best possible out of, the
material given him.
During this period there have been
many individual stars, among whose
names appear those of Snow, '02;
Heston, '04; Hammond, '07; Weeks,
'02; Benbrook, '11; Craig, '14; Maul-
betch, '17; and countless others.

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equipped with a dirt floor that is the
only one of its kind in the West this
year. Illinois has formerly had the
use of such a 'gymnasium but the
building was taken over by the S. A.
T. C. and the whole floor covered
with concrete.
MORE ENTRIES WANTED
FOR FRESHMEN MEET
FRATERNITIES PLAN TO DONATE
SUBSTANTIAL PRIZES
FOR PLACES
"We would like to see more men
out for the All-fresh meet next Satur-
day," Carl Johnson said yesterday.
The well-known -sprinter is anxious
that as many as possible take advan-
tage of this opportunity to get some
good experience in track.
Entries Grow in Number
About 70 first year men have sig-
nified their intention of entering the
meet Saturday but this number is not
as large as it should be according to
Johnson. He believes that there is
much good material in the University
among the freshmen and all that is
necessary to bring it out is a little
encouragement.
The games this week were express-
ly arranged in order to give ambi-
tious freshmen a chance to see their
real possibilities. Regular gatherings
of freshmen have been held in the
Waterman gymnasium for the last few
weeks. All of these men are trying
each of the events and some are sur-
prised to find that they have ability of
which they never before knew. Doctor
May has done everything possible to
.encourage this spirit among the fresh-
men and has achieved some remarka-
ble results.
Only freshmen will take part in the
meet. This was decided upon be-
cause it has been found that the year-
lings had not the confidence to stand
up against the experienced Varsity.
Next Saturday the men will get all the
experience of a meet against the Var-
sity and at the same time will feel
that they are in a contest where there
is a chance to win. Until the regu-
lar freshmen team is picked there
will be no line-up against the first
string runners.
Varsity Acts as Tutor
Varsity men are finding it interest-
ing and also beneficial to instruct the
aspirants in their own line. They arE
always ready to offer any hints of
(Continued on Page Six)

Chicago Track Too Slow for Records
The University of Chicago's indoor
running track is one of the slowest
in this section of the country. Binga
ismond, the former Chicago star, who

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holds the Conference- outdoor record
of 47 4-5 seconds in the 440 yard dash,
has never negotiated the distance on
the Maroon gymnasium track in less
than 54 3-5 secondls.

An Appointment With The
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DIAMOND MEN START
INDOOR BATTING URILL
RETURN OF REGULARS POINTS TO
REPETITION OF 1918
RECORD
Inside the big net in Waterman gym-
nasium the Wolverine base ball squad
started batting practice Monday aft-
ernoon for the first time this season.
For the past 10 days the Maize and
Blue diamond artists have been lim-
bering up stiffened muscles in their
afternoon workouts by scooping up the
grounders that Coach Lundgren knock-
ed out to them. In this work the
candidatees have shown remarkable
development, gathering 'in the hot
ones and pegging to the sack with a
snap and precision that promises well
for the 1919 season.
Pitching Staff Works Well
Bob Glenn, who was captain of the
nine last season and who injured his
arm in the Chicago tilt in June, is in
the box giving the men their first
batting tryout. Schiedler, Kimball,
Parks, and Lemp will take turns with
Glenn on the mound this week. En-
gle is also tossing them over to the
boys handling the stick.

WOLVERINES TO FIGURE
IN CONFERENCE THICK

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619 E. Liberty

RETURN OF SOLDIERS
OTTLOOV- FOR BIG
SEASON

CHIANGES
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Michigan's easy win from the Uni-
versity of Chicago track team aug-
nents considerably the chances of
C'oach Farrell's 'amen at the indoor
Conference meet, March 21 and 22.
The present strength of the various
Big Ten teams is, with a few excep-
tions, unknown. Wisconmsin was de-
feated by Notre Dame last Saturday
n a close meet, decided by the relay
at the last momeent. This would seem
to eliminate th; Badgers in the cham-
pionship race, though they had some
good naminin a few events.
Maroons Down Purdue
PureLue was decisively whalloped by
Chica gogat Bartlett gymnasium two
week s ago. The weight events went
tO t'ae Boilermakers but in all else the
Ma roon men demonstrated great sup-
er.ority. This meet and the Notre
D ame-Wisconsinencounter seem to
F ;ive Michigan the edge on at least,
three Conference teams.
Nothing can be ascertained concern-
ing the teams that Illinois, Northwest-
ern, Minnesota, Ohio State, Indiana,
and Iowa will send to the Northwest-
ern meet. It is not thought that any
of them are much better than -the
teams that Michigan defeated last
year, thought the influx of returning
veterans may develop unexepcted
strength. Chicago should have nc
trouble in taking the mile run as Mc-
Cosh has more than once demonstrat-
ed his ability to win from any of the
Conference distance men.
Pick Wolverines to 'Win
Other athletes who are concedes
points on previous performances ar(
Johnson' and Cross 'of Michigan. Al
the two Conference meets last yeai
and in both indoor meets this season
they have carried off the expecte&
number of places.
The Northwestern gymnasium is

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Huber and Hayes, two new men whe,
have been working out regularly fo'r
the backstop position, are gettiu g
their opportunity to show their wor th
behind the bat, as the coach has r lot
seen them in action before this spri ng.-
Schlunt, a new candidate, reported for
work Saturday and will add streiagth
to that minority aggregation of -plate
defenders. Cohn could not com e out
until the end of the basketball a eason
but has been getting in the is elding
practice this week. He is in condi-
tion from his basket work &mid as an
addition to the catching stalL takes
a load off the baseball mento r's mind.
The opening batting pracf4Lce finds
Adams, Novak and Hatch. covering
the initial bag, ' Garret, P'neney, and
Labadie, brother of Captiin Labadie
of the 1917 team, taking care of the
keystone sack, and Captain. Knode,
Froemke and Van Boven contesting
the hot corner of the diamond.
Veterans in Outfield
Langenham and Cooper, veterans of
last year's nine, and six or eight o-ther
outfielders of promising caliber are
making competition hot for the gaarden
positions.
The practice Tuesday afternoon was
all that could be looked for at this
stage of the developments. The, siap
in the fielding showed that the nimen
are still there at that game and the
batting workout was satisfactory to
the coach in every respect.
That the Michigan nine this yiear
will be the equal of that of last s ea-
son, is the opinon of Coach Lundgl -en
after 1,0 days' of fielding practice. He
thinks that the Wolverines have an
excellent chance to repeat the. Ig 'en
xidtory of 1918, despite the fact i iat
a number of other Conference ii tes
have. n 'arly all their quota of 'i 117
stars.
DANCING

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GAMES TO START
IN BARBOUR GYM
Sophomore and 'freshman women
will clash in the first game of the in-
terclass series at 4 o'clock on Wed-
nesday, March 12, in Barbour gym-
nasium. The contest promises to be
interesting and deserves a large at-
tendance.
The lineup is as follows:
Sophomore team-Forwards: Neva
Nelson, Katrina Schermerhorn; cent-
ers: Helen Koch, Edith Ap.fel; guards:
Phyllis Wiley, Jessie Craig. Fresh-
inan team-Forwards: Hazel Storz,
Thekla Wermuth; centers: Gertrude
Boggs, Selma Mueller; guards: Ada
Duffies, Frances Weimar.
Juniors and seniors will play in the
second game of the series at 4 o'clock
on Friday, March 14. The seniors are
confident of victory but the uniors do
not lack the fighting spirit. Both
teams have shown up well in prac-
tice and the contest promises to be a
fight from start to finish. The game
will be the main feature of the Wom-
en's league party and will be followed
by dancing.
The lineup: Junior team - For-
wards: Dorothy Jones, Edna Daskam;
centers: Elsie Erley, Marjorie Van
Norman; guards: Lucy Huffman, Sue
Verlenden. Senior team-Forwards:
Jane Duemling, Ruth Kirk; centers:
Norma Mark, Phyllis Egglestone;
guards: Ethel Glauz, Doris McDonald.

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