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March 12, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-12

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THE WEATHER
TEMPERATURE
NOT UCH HANGD I

A6F
t

fiattx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE
PRICE THREE CENT

VOL. XXIX. No. 112.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12, 1919.

30 U.S. TREATIES
PRESENTLEAGUE
Of NATIONSIDEA
BRYAN SUGGESTS LARGER VOTING
POWER; MAINTENANCE Of
MONROE DOCTRINE
"GREATEST PEACE STEP
IN THOUSAND YEARS"
"Deliberation Before War, Reduction
of Armaments, Open Diplomacy,
Justify Our Support'
BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)
London, March 11. - The German
government troops, greatly re-efor-
ed, have resumed the fighting in Lich-
tenberg, says a German wireless dis-
patch received here tonight.
Archangel, March 11.-Operating 10
guns, the Bolshevik forces yesterday
shelled the village of Vistavka on the
Vaga, almost completely destroying it.
Repeated heavy infantry attacks fol-
lowed, but tse, were repulsed by
American, British, and Russian troops,
the Bosheviki suffering heavy losses.
The Allies were greatly oufnumbered
but fought bravely in the snow. 5
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 11. - William
Jennings Bryan issued the statement
tonight endorsing the League of Na-
tions but suggesting amendments to
the proposed constitution which among
other things would preserve specifi-
cally the Monroe Doctrine, enlarge
the proportionate voting power of the
United States, and make it clear that
each member nation might decide for
itself whether it would support de-
crees of the League's general council.
Less Risks in League
While pointing to imperfections, Mr.
Bryan uirged that they should not be
allowed to lead to rejection of the
plan, declaring that risks to be run in
accepting the League were less than
those involved in rejection and return-
lug "to the old ways of blood and
slaughter." -
Friendly Criticism Needed
Mr. Bryan dictated the statement
from his sick bed at the home of
friends, where he has been confined for
nearly three weeks. He said the
League of Nations idea, "the greatest
step toward peace' in a thousand
years," was taken from the 30 arbitra-
(Continued on Page Six)
POLAND CALS MILITARY
CLSSES oF 181-1896
Paris, March 11.- (French Wire-
less Service.)-The Polish national
assembly, according to a dispatch
from Warsaw; has approved by a un-
animous vote a law calling to military
service the classes of 1891 to 1896, in-
clusive. It is expected that the meas-
ure will provide Poland with an army
of 601,000.
15po0 Sailors for Hun Navy
London, March 11.-The personnel
of the German fleet is to be restrict-
ed to i5,00 the supreme, council has
decided, according to press dispatches
from Paris. The military conditions
to be imposed on Germany include
guarantees.that no tanks will be built,
no more poison gas manufactured,

and that all German war materials
must be handed over and destroyed.
It is added that Allied conditions will
supervise the carrying out of these
terms.
Peace to be Signed Before April
London, March 11.- Lloyd George
and Foreign Secretary Balfour have
sent word to, their colleagues here
that the peace conference has nearly
completed its work, the Evening News
learps. The draft of the peace treaty
already has been finished and will be
signed before the end of March.
"Sign Here"
When the Germans are summoned
to Paris the News adds, the treaty
will be read to them and they will be
invited to sign it. There will be no
discussion with a view to alterations
of the principle articles of the treaty.
If it is thought necessary questions
involving the adjustment of details

ANNUAL CAMPAIGN
STAR TED BY WOMEN
The annual life membership cam-
paign is being launched this week by
the Women's league. Over 3,000
pamphlets will be sent out to mem -
bers of the seniior class and to the
alumnae..
Ten dollars is the fee of life mem-
bership. All life members are kept
informed of league plans and are en-
titled to all the privileegs of Univer-
sity league members. A life member-
ship pin is being planned by the mem-
bership committee.
Life membership campaigns were
begun in 116-17. Last year, because
of the war conditions the work was
suspended. It is now being resumed
among undergraduates, alumnae and
all others interested in the league.
FAIR CHANCE FOR ALL IN
GLEE CLUB TR-OUTS
The Glee club tryouts were again
unsuccessful. Theodore Harrison, the
director, was unable to secure enough
first tenors in the tryouts Thursday
night at his studio to fill the vacancies
in the club.
Although Mr. Harrison had said that
this would be the last chance for the
University to have a Glee club, he will
again try at 7:30 o'clock Thursday
night at his studio in the University
School of Music. This is absolutely
the last time that the University stu-
dents will have to back this musical
organiation.
"Every one should turn out, no mat-
ter what chance he thinks he has.
One man made, the club this evening
who had not come out before because
he thought he had no chance. Every
one will be given a fair chance, and
you may make the club despite your
supposed deficiencies," says Mr. Har-
rison.
The Mandolin club tryouts were sue-
cessfal, and the temporary personnel
of the club will be announced as soon
as it is known whetherthere will be
a Glee club. Those persons desiring
to try out for the Mandolin club, may
do so by comumunicating with Frank
Taber, at 1505.
STUDENT COUNCIL
TO TAKE IN MEN
A special meeting of the student
council has been called for 7 o'clock
Wednesday night in the old Union.
The newly elected members will be
taken in and among the important
topics to be discussed is the new con-
titution which has been drawn up.
GOODSPEED BACK AGAIN;
WAS WITH BRITISH FORCES
Harrison L. Goodspeed, ex-18E, en-
tered the University Tuesday from ac-
tive service in naval aviation. Good-
speed enlisted in the coast patrol in
April, 1917. In November of that year
he was transferred to naval aviation
and attached to the British air force.
He received an ensign's commission
while in London in May, 1918. He has
seen 14 months' foreign service in
England and France.
WISCONSIN PROF PREPARES
MEN FOR U. S. CITIZENSIP
Madison, Wis., March 10.-With a
view to preparing candidates for nat-
uraliation through courses in English

and citizenship, a state-wide plan is
being worked out by Prof. D. D. Lesco-
hier, of the University of Wisconsin,
in co-operation with the U. S. Bureau
of naturalization, according to the
University Press Bulletin.
BELGIAN BABY BENEFIT
In order to help raise funds
lorrthe benefit of Belgian babies,
the .elta Gamma sorority is
selling 50o tickets for the Arc-
ade theaier today. The attrac-
tion is Ethel Barrymore in "The
Divorcee." Only the tickets
bought through this source will
be used for this purpose and if
anyone wishes to help this fund
he should call 452 or buy the
tickets which are 20 cents from.
a member of that sorority.

SENIORS TO CHOOSE
Motion Passed at Senior Lit Meeting
to Ask All Colleges to
Co-operate'
"OFFICERS OF THE DAY"
ELECTED BY SENIOR LITS
Senior members of all colleges at
the University will be asked to co-
operate with the senior literary class
in deciding the nature of the memor-
ial to be left to the University by the
class of 1919, according to a motion
passed at a meeting of the senior lit-
erary class yesterday.
"Officers of the Day" Elected
Plans for Commencement were dis-
cussed at the meetin and "officers of
the dayv were elected as follows: class
historian, Ralph C. Gault; class poet,
H. C. L. Jackson;class orator, Eva
Herzberg Foss; and class prophet,
Archie D. McDonald.
All Senior lits are requested to call
at the waiting room of Dean Effin-
ger's office and sign their home ad-
dress opposite their name on the class
roll, which S. W. Sedgwick, '19, will
have in his charge from 9 a. m. to 12
m. and from 2 p. m. until 3:30 p. m.
Wednesday, March 12. These names
and addresses are to appear on the
commencement invitations and it is
essential that this information be giv-
en today for no other time to do so
will be scheduled. 4
CHICAGO UNIVERSITY
DEAN SPEKER HERE
.1
TO LECTURE AT GRADUATING
EXERCISES TO SENIOR
MEDICS
With the securing of Dr. John M.
Dodson as speaker for the 1919 medic
commencement plans for the gradua-
tion exercises which are to be held
March 20 are nearing completion. Dr.
Dodson is dean of the University of
Chicago medical school and will speak
on the subject of "The Interne Year."
Contrary to the first plans the exer-
cises will be held in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall instead of Hill auditorium.
The seniors will wear gowns.
U. S. Fleet Given
Hearty Send Off
(By Associated Press)
London, March 11.- Officers and
men of the grand fleet miss their'com-
rades of ' the American battleship
squadron whicll shared the war virgil
of the British navy. The text just
made public of the messages ex-
changed by the two forces when the
Amercian ships departed Dec. 1,
shows how strong was the friendship
between them.
As the American dreadnaughts
steamed away, the British commander-
in-chief signalled:
"Your comrades of the grand fleet
regret your departure. We trust this
id only temporary, and that the inter-
change of squadrons from the two
great fleets of the Anglo-Saxon race
may be repeated. We wish you good-
bye, good luck, and that you will have
a good time and come back soon."
In reply came the following:
"Your friendly and brotherly signal

of God-speed is deeply appreciated by
the officers and men of your sixth fiat-
tle squadron. We will never forget
the hospitality, which has made us
feel a part of ypur big family, and we
intend to maintain that relation for
all time. We all hope to serve under
your command.".
The use of the word "your" was lost
upon no one in the grand fleet, least
of all Admiral Beatty. Another mess-
age was immediately sent:
"This is indicative of the intimate
brotherly unity and sympathy which
exists on both sides of that greatest
ocean highway, the Atlantic, and, as
it is not joined by land, is kept warm
and alive largely by men of the sea."
To which- the American squadron
made answer:
"The officers and men of the sixth
battleship squadron appreciate more
than can be explained the never-end-
ing hospitality of the officers and
men of the grand fleet.

OF HOPPUBLISHED
Letters to be 3failed to Fraternities
Informing Them of De-
cisions
LIVE 1P 'TO RULES AND
MAKE IT SUCCESS-VELDE
For the interest of those fraternities
contemplating the holding of house
parties in connection with the J-Hop,
the following rules regarding the 1919
Hop are published:
First, r6le 10 in the petition to the
University senate provides that house
parties shall commence not earlier
than Friday morning and end not later
than Sunday afternoon.
Second, the selection of dhaperons
for house parties is, of course, left in
the hands of the groups concerned,
but the chaperons should be definitely
informed of the wishes of the Univer-
sity in the following matters: there
should be no dancing at the house
after the Hop. After a reasonable
time for refreshments and rest the
party should break up; dances or
other festivities on Saturday night
should end promptly at midnight.
Prof. Louis A. Strauss, chairman of
the committee in charge of student af-
fairs said: "These rules will prob-
ably apply this year. The above rules
will undoubtedly not be changed, but
amendments may be made when the
committee meets to decide upon the
question. Letters will then -be mailed
to all the fraternities informing them
of the decisions of the committees."
Karl Velde, '20, chairman of the
J-Hop committee, said: "I hope that
the fraternities will live up to the
rules and confine themselves to the
limits prescribed by them. The fra-
ternities should attempt to make their
parties a greater success than ever."
ENGINEER RESERVISTS.
TO RECEIVE 560 BONUS

NO

DEFINWE INFORMATION ONI

GIRLS' PLAY TO BE
GIVEN AT WHITNEY
The Junior Girls' play will be given
in the Whitney theater this year. This
will be the first year that it will be
held in any place other than Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. There will be
but one performance given, Wednesday1
evening, April 2.
Senior girls will be given compli-
mentary tickets. Other girls will be
able to secure tickets at 50 eents. After
March 31 a number of reserved seats]
may be secured at 60 cents. Rehears-
als are gaining ground fine. The sec-
ond act will be undertaken some time
this week, it is hoped. All lyrics areI
in and look very promising. The whole
production has created considerable
enthusiasm among those taking roles.
THREE TO BE CHOSENt
FOR BANK SCHOLRSHIPS
SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS TO
BE GIVEN PREFERENCE IN
SELECTING
Three recommendations will be
made by the University department
of Economics for scholarships that arer
offered by the National City bank of
New York city for its college training
class for foreign service.p
Preference in rendering theses rec-1
ommendations will be given to mem-
bers of the sophomore and junior
classes, although senior and graduate
students are not excluded.
The men proposed will be interview-
ed by an officer of the National City
bank, either in New York or in some
other convenient place, and if accepta-
ble will be given this opportunity fors
'one year's work in the bank before
being sent for foreign service.
The students accepted by the bank
will apportion their one year's time
as follows:
Sophomores will spend two summer1
vacations at the bank, one between
their sophomore and junior years, and
the other between their junior and se-
nior years. The remainder of their
training course will consist of six
months at the bank, to be completed
before or after graduation at a time
convenient to the bank and to the
student's university, as close to the
date of the student's graduation as
may be possible.
Juniors will spend the summer va-
cation between their Junior and Senior
years at the bank, and will complete
the course by spending nine months
at the bank at a time to be determined
in a similar way as that of the sopho-
mores.
Seniors and graduate students who
are accepted by the bank will be in-
cluded in the existing class of under-
graduates in exactly the same status
as their classmates, except that their
year of study at the bank will be con-
tinuous from the date of their en-
rollment.
All students desiring to apply for
these fellowships will meet Professor
Sharfman at 4 o'clock Thursday after-
non in room 102 of the Economics
building.
SELECT 19 FOR FINAL
FRENCH PLAY TRY-OUT

Preliminary try-outs for the Cercle
Francais play was successful, and
were attended by a large number of
budding actors and actresses. The
following were picked to appear for
a second tryout:
Lois De Vries, '21; Blanche Goodell.
'19; Harriet Gustin, '22; Marion
Hayes, '19; Lucile Myers, '22; Mar-
garet Park, '22; Bertrol Summers, '22;
Berenice Warson, '22; Nora -Wilson,
'19; D.D V. Brock, '19; W. Emmons,
grad.; J. Friedman, '21; A. J. Hinm-
melhoch, '21; N. Lambert, '22; M. E.
McGowan, '21E; L. H. Seltzer, '20;
H. Velleman, '21; .D. Watts, '21, and
A. W. Wilson, '21.
Those who have been picked, and
those, who have not yet. appaered,
should attend the additional try-outs
to be held at 7:30 o'clock Wednesday
evening in room 202, S. W

MICHI6AN LOSES-
TO INDIANA I
FINAL_24 TO 1s.
HOOSIERS OUTPLAY WOLVERINE
0T BOTH PERIODS OF
HARD GAME
DEAN AND BARRIEN
STARS OF BATTU
Bloomington Quintet Wins by Excel
lent Dribbling and Accurate
Basket Shooting
(Special to The Michigan Daily)
Bloomington, Ind., March 1,1.-(vi
the Associated Press) .-Indiana wa
too speedy for the Michigan quinte
here tonight, winning the basketbal
game 24 to 16.%
The Maize and 'Blue five put up a
stubborn fight in the first half of te
contest, but toward the middle of th
second period the Hoosiers bega
counting rapidly.
Substitutes Forced in Game
Two substitutes by the Wolverine
were thrown in, but failed to mak
more than a feeble effort at a come
back as Indiana was fighting all th
harder with victory in sight.
Wilson replaced Rychener as righ
guard in the second period. Iater
Emery was sent in by Coach Mithcel
for MClintock, but "Doc" failed ti
start an effective return.
Michigan Five Out Dribbled
Dean and Barrien 'played in excep
tional form for Indiana, outdistancin
the Michigan basketeers in fast drb
bles. This style of playing was a new.
form for the Hoosiers, and somewha
perplexed the Wolverine team.
The entire Bloomington team play
ed at top speed throughout the en
tire contest, while the Ann Arbor
ites showed occasional spurts an
classy team work.
No Individual Wolverine Star
There were no particular stars fo
the Wolverines during the gam
Hewlett shined in foul throwing, pu
ting the ball in the net 8 out of 1
trys. This is the highest record h
has made in a Western Conferenc
basketball game.
Karpus managed to throw two flel
baskets, while Williams and Emer
tossed one basket a piece. Rychene
(Continued on Page Six)
i501O005000 FOR GooD
MICHIGAN0ROAD s.AKE
"The people of Washtenaw count
should have a definite and compr
hensive understanding of what the
are voting for, before attemptjng t
cast a ballot at the State good road
amendment election that will be hel
on April 7," was the statement of M
Roscoe 0. Bonisteel yesterday.
To make the purpose of this ele
tion clear to every voter a commi
tee has been appointed and the couni
is being organized in order that tt
true significance of this election ma
be appreciated by all.
At the present time the state le
islature has the power to vote for a
appropriation of $250,000 towards ti
building of highways throughout ti
state. This is entirely inadequate fo

the needs of the highway departmen
according to Mr. Bonisteel. There
fore a vote is being taken to amen
the constitution of the state, thereb
giving the legislature power to bot
(Continued on Page Six)
KAHN TO SPEAK HERE
Albert Kahn, of Detroit, archi-
tect of many of the buildings on
the campus, will give a lecture
on "Chateaux of Tourain,"
Thursday afternoon at 4:15
o'clock in the Natural Sciepce
lecture room. Mr. Kahn has
been over the entire territory
himself and brings with him
slides with which he will illus-
trate the lecture.
He is brought here under the
auspices of the Ann Arbor Art
association. The lecture is open
to the public and everybody is
welcome.

MEDICAL RESERVE MEN
OBTAINED
Information received at Major Dur-
kee's office in the Union building from
the quartermasters corps headquar-
ters states that members of the engi-
neer reserve who were not called in-
to active service until Nov. 15 are
eligible to receive the $60 bonus due
to discharged and released service
men.
The local S. A. T. C. office has been
flooded with inquiries as to whether
the University men who were mem-
bers of Engineer Reserve and were
not called into active service until aft-
er the armistice was signed can apply
ofr the bonus.
Though no definite information can
be had relative to the bonus for the
Medical Reserve men who were called
into active service after Nov. 11 into
the Naval unit it is probable that the
act will effect them similarly.
NEWARK, N. J., CLUB CON-
DUCTS PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN
Representatives of each of the
Greater Newark high schools were ap-
pointed members of a committee to
conduct a publicity campaign at a
meeting of the Greater Newark, N. J.,
club held Saturday evening in Lane
hall. The object of the campaign is
to interest mod; New Jersey men in
Michigan.
A constitution committee was ap-
pointed and decision was made to
hold a meeting at 7:15 o'clock Satur-
day, March 15, in Lane hall. At this
meeting permanent officers will be
elected.
All students whose homes are in
Newark or its suburbs are invited to
attend the meeting.
TWO COUNCILMEN ELECTED AT
JUNIOR MEETING YESTERDAY
William W. Hinshaw, '20, and
George D. Anderson, '20, were elected
as class councilmen at a meeting of
the junior literary class Tuesday aft-
ernoon in Mason hall. There was a
very small attendance at the meet-
ing.

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