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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 11, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

#T

OFFICIAL NaEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published everymorning except Monday
during the university year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
MIEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
nhthis paper and also the local news pub-'
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor
~x cgan, as second class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, 96; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 30 words,
ai signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
pear in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
notices of events will be published in The
la ily at the discretion of the ditor, if left
at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
consideration. No manuscript will be re-
turned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
sentiments expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Clarence Roeser ...........Managing Editor
H. C. L. Jackson.............City Editor
HTarry M. Carey... .. .News Editor
Bruce Millr............'elegraph Editor
M'Iilton Marx...r............Associate Editor
"^David B. Landis.............Sport Editor
Marguerite Clark..........Women's Editor
Martha Guernsey...........Women's Editor
Charles R. Osius, Jr..........,State Editor
ark K. Ehlbert.........Efficiency Editor
Rth Dailey ..............Exchange Editor
ISSUE EDITORS
Edgar L. Rice Henry O'Brien
Joseph A. Bernstein Renaud Sherwood
Paul G. Weber E. D. Flintermann
Paul A. Shinkman
REPORTERS
Philip Ringer Mary D. Lane
Margaret Christie Edna Apel
Marie Crozier Irene Ellis
ierbert R. Slusser J. P. Hart
Carlton F. Wells
BUSINESS STAFF
Harold Makinson..........Business Manager
Agnes L. Abele......Asst. Business Manager
LeGrand A. Gaines...Asst. Business Manager
v.Wn. M. LeFevr. .sst Business Manager
Wm. A. Leitzinger...Asst. Business Manager
Donald M. Major... .Asst. Business Manager
Donnell R. Schoffner. .Asst. Business Manager
Mark B. Covell Edward Priehs Jr.
Robert 1. McKean Henry Whiting II
George A. Cadwell
JUNIOR STAFF
Curt P. Schneider Isabelle Farnumn
Harold P. Lindsay Duane Miller
Maynard A. Newton Geo. R. Strimbeck, Jr.
R. A. Sullivan
TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1919.
Issue Editor -Herbert Slusser
FUTURISTS AND PRESENTISTS
We are all ambitious. All of us have
some goal which we hope to reach
some day-if we didn't, life wouldn't
be worth much. Some of us have
greater ambitions than others. Some
of us think we will be satisfied with
lesser things.
How many of us really take our
ambitions very seriously? We have
hopes of realizing them, but we think,
h with a mental wave of the hand, that
the future will take care of every-
thing.
What we should realize is that it
is our daily work that makes for the
fulfillment of our ambitions. The goal
will not be reached by waiting for
it to arrive.
It is pleasant to dream of the"sweet
bye and bye," but we must remember
that we are in the act of shaping it
day by day. It lies with us to make
the dreams of the future come true.
The "do it now" method is one of the
best ever for realizing ambitions.
Don't be a futurist. Be a presentist.
STUMP SOCKS FOR MAIMED
SOLDIERS
One of the most pathetic sights that
will greet the eye in the near future,
are the returned soldiers with maim-

ed or missing limbs. A movement
under way to provide stump socks for
the maimed soldiers should need no
impetus among the women.
The soldiers who are coming back
imaimed, and who will be handicapped
all their lives because they came to
the aid of their country, should be
shown every consideration that the
country can offer.
Some women think that since the
war is ended they need not knit any
longer. The need for the stump socks
.has been shown to be a pressing one,
and instead of relaxing their efforts,
the women shonuld increase them,
and make it their duty to see that
every maimed soldier is provided. This
is not so much to ask, considering'
what the soldier has done.
A "mother-may-I-go-out-to-swim"
movement will be inaugurated as soon
as the municipal beach is completed.
After all, the delegates to the peace
conference are human. Now they are,
quarrelling over the coal problem.
Why shouldn't the hungry Bolshe-
viki look to Leon Trotzky for food.
Didn't he wait table in New York?
The Lemberg armist*e will be
signed soon. We hope it won't smell

The Guillotine

On the Road to To-le-de
(Asking the pardon of Mr. Kipling
and the Ann Arbor Railroad)
By the engineering forge shop on a
pile of rusty junk
There's a waitress softly settin', she's
the jane that made me flunk,
For the wind is in the elm trees and
the noble chimes they shriek
Come you back you class room dodger
for you've got to work this week.
CHORUS
On the road to To-le-do with the en-
gine wheezing so,
You could hear our bones a-rattlin'
on the road to To-le-do,
On the road to To-le-do bouncing

swiftly to and fro,
Sittin' sadly in the smoker
cinders and the snow.

dodgin'1

For her petticoat was yaller a
little cap was green,
Her name I never knew it,I
say she was some queen,
I saw her first a-chewing of a
spearmint gum
And a-wastin' soulful kisses on
young village bum.

and her
but I'll
wad of
i a gay

FEW GIRLS ATTEND GAMES
LACK OF INTEREST IN ATHLETICS
IS DEPLORED BY UNIVERSITY
WOMEN
Not so many years ago the dimen-
sions of Barbour gymnasium were
too small to accommodate the crowd
of feminine enthusiasts at women's
basketball contests. In fact, rules
were established restricting the num-
ber of attendants, and the number of
tickets for each game was definitely
limited. This year, it is a rare oc-
currence when the four bare walls of
the gym are hidden from view by spec-
tators. And this in spite of the fact
that the Women's Athletic association
today has more names on its membet-
ship roll than at any previous time
in its career.
Undoubtedly the demands of the
war-time period had their effects here
as -elsewhere. The subjugating of
normal activities to knitting socks
and folding compresses left little ex-
cess time in University women's sched-
ules for energetic support of their
athletics. With the comparative cessa-
tion of these demands, however, Uni-
versity authorities and students are
once more united in concerted effort
to "normalize" the campus.
At 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon,
there will be a basketball game be-
tween the sophomore and freshman
women. It will be the first game of
the inter-class series. This repre-
sents just one among the definite op-
portunities for girls to display their
interest in the University through the
medium of their own activities. And
support of one of their own major
activities is a fair index to the ex-
tent of their interest in that bigger
heritage of men and women alike,-
Michigan spirit.
TWO STUDENTS.

Senior
practice
Tuesday
nasium.

and freshman basketball
will be held at 4:50 o'clock
afternoon in Barbour gym-

The class in apparatus work will be
held at 3 o'clock Wednesday afternoon
in Barbour gymnasium.
A freshman-sophomore game will
be played at 4 o'clock Wednesday aft-
ernoon in Barbour gymnasium. This
is the first interclass game of the sea-

don't stop short of the

"Standard"- It positively has no equal-All sizes,

and everyone guaranteed.

WAH R'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

son.

Y. W. C. A.
held at 3:30
ernoon in the
nasium.
Stylus will
night at the

cabinet meeting will be
o'clock Wednesday aft-
parlors of Barbour gym-
meet at 7:45 o'clock to-
Chi Omega house, 1503

Washtenaw avenue. Mr. Cowden will
address the rherflbers.
Use the itay to reach the students.
Four thousand students read it every
morning.-Adv.
Students read The Daily.-Adv.

I ~L~~ome

THE "STANDARD Stands Alone

When purchasing a

Loose Leaf Note Book

The World War and Its
ordConsequences
.3y WILLIAM HERBERT HOBBS
Charles W. Graham
Successor to Sheehan & Co.

CHORUS
On the road to To-le-do, we could
feel our terror grow
For the cinders fly like bullets on the
road to To-le-do,
On the road to To-le-do, black and
sooty as a crow,
With our feet upon the cushions we
were praying soft and low.
Oh, I'm tired of wasting shekels in
these city cabarets
And the round of oyster cocktails
keeps me low for many days,
I've gazed at all the singers from
the Boody to the Grand
And clapped at all the encores till I
nearly broke my. hand.

I

11

"Don't Change
Your Husband"

11

ALWAYS ASK FOR

Ray's "BETSY ROSS" Shop
The Fountain Room Delue

onnoor 's
P 0s

Not Fudge Sundaes
lint.Chocolate

Whipped Cream Sodas
Supreme Malted Milks

ICE CREAM

CHORUS
On the road to To-le-do with the
coaches shaking so,
With the smoker full of milk cans ont
the road to To-le-do,
On the road to To-le-d with the en-I
gine running slow
And the fireman throwing snowballs
as he watched the hours go.
Ship me somewheres west of Ypsi
where the railroads are the worst,
Though there's ten score strict corn-
mandments you can slake a-Bevo#
thirst,
For the wind is in the elm trees and
the noble chimes they shriek
Come you back you class room dodgery
for you've got to work this week.
Today the Senior Engineer wantedI
to know if he storming of the Bas-
tile was a spring shower,
"Here's to the Prize Team."-Daily
editorial head. We hope that field1
meet wasn't a stock show.
Rip Van Winkle1
In Chicago there is a ban on wink-
ing. Move your eyelid a little and
you will be arrested on a charge of
disorderly conduct. Think of it! And1
we know a man who winked so hard at
a passing attraction on State street
yesterday that he busted two buttons
off of his vest.
Sort of a League of Nations 1
"The bride was attired in a trav-
eling suit of navy blue trimmed with
Italian chiffon and carried a bouquet
of English violets."-Bad Axe (Mich.);
Chronicle. Why dont' they play thej
Victors for ye bride as she drags him;
up to the altar nowadays.]
Art for Art's Sake
There was powder on his shoulder,S
There was rouge upon his ve?.
Her complexion Arthur told h
Didn't seem to stand the test.]
With her cheek a trifle duller]
He told her of the Hun barrage,
"But, dear, I hate this local color 7
It's poor taste, this camouflage."
heredity-Professors Front and Center
Prisoner-"If you please, sir, I wish
you would put me in cell 348."E
Jailor-"What for?"
Prisoner (with tears)-"Just a bit
of sentiment, sid. That's the one poor
father always had."
Famous Closing Lines
"Gee, I'm some sprinter," said
Adam, "first in the human race!"
LOUIS VXI.
BE INDEPENDENT OF "DAD" 1
Earn your own spending money.t
Turn your spare time into dollars.-
Just a few more places open. Give
phone. Address Dollars care of Daily
-Adv.
Michigan's paper for Michigan men.
..Adv.

WOMEN ENGINEERS AS-
SERT WAR-EARNED RIGHTS
London.-Women engineers, one of
the discoveries of the war, have _
banded together in the Woman's En-
gineering society, a trade union, which
has decided upon what the women
term a "forward" movement.
The women, who are doing techni-
cal work in government and controlled
factories, as well as in privately own-
ed institutions, want among other
things:
Admission to the Amalgamated So-
ciety of Engineers, to become mem-
bers of institutes of civil engineers,
naval architects, iron and steel and
other bodies now closed to women, to
serve on the boards of universities,
and to become eligible for technical
branches of the higher civil service.
"Women have no desire to take
men's places," is the way theyput
their position. "But there will be need
for engineering products throughout
the world, and there will be work for
women as well as for men."
BIG YEAR'S PROGRAM PLANNED
AT MENORAH SOCIETY MEETING
Unusual attendance characterized
the meeting of the Michigan Menorah
society, Sunday, at which Prof. I. Leo
Sharfman, of the economics depart-
ment, was the principal speaker.
David Seligson, '19D, and Simon
Shetzer, '21, were elected to the execu-
tive board of the society.
Plans for holding a Purim program
Sunday afternoon, March 16, 1919,
were entertained at the meeting and
a committee consisting of Maurice
Ripps, '20, chairman; Esther Robin-
son, '19; Ida E. Mines, '20; Hanah
Blumenthal, '20; Samuel Madison, '21;
Simon Shetzer, '21, and Samuel Lam-
port, '20, publicity, was appointed to
arrange for the affair.
Preliminary announcements are to
the effect that several artists from
Detroit will be invited here to sup-
plement an already arranged musical
program.
NEW YORK BILL WOULD MAKE
"PEACE DAY" STATE HOLIDAY
Albany, N. Y., March 10.-A bill de-
signed to make November 11 a holi-
day known as "Peace Day" has been
introduced in the New York state leg-
islature.
Another bill would authorize city
and county officials to provide in 1919
for a city or county, celebration in
honor of returned and returning sold-
iers, sailors and marines of the World
war, and to provide medals, badges
and decorations for them.
Use the Daily to reach the studnts.
Four thousand students read it every
morning.-Adv.
Come On DEad
"THE OPERA OF OPERAS"

We Cater To Those Who Demand The Best
14. 9 nickels Arcade

Delicious and Refreshing

Perpetuate With Pictures.
Uncle Sam perpetuated his war activities with Pictures.
Big Business perpetuates its developments with Pictures.
Families perpetuate their members with Pictures.
Why Not Perpetuate University Life
with Pictures
Why not have a snap, or flashlight, of the "Bunch," the "Dance," or
the hundred and one other things that occur at "Michigan?" Nothing
tells the sto like a Picture. They make delightful souvenirs that will
be cherishe long after other things are forgotten.
You kno or if you don't you can find out for yourself, that Lyndon's
Flashlights and Groups are in a class by themselves. Many have tried and
are still trying but none have succeeded in approaching them in quality.
I am 'telling you this but don't take my word for it, be your own judge.
Now it's a simple thing to get these pictures; just call Lyndon, and he'll
get them, night or day.
Please get your order in before 8 P. M. for evening.
9LYNDON, 79N. University Ave.
LY D N Tel. 458F1, or F

Dependable, Scientific, Drugless
EYE
EXAMINATIONS
Phone 590 for appointment
Emil H Arnold
Optometrist 220 S. Mam St
Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES

I

ORNAMENTAL VEIL PINS
New and practical. Pins Veil in front of Hat.
IN STERLING SILVER AND BRILLIANT SETTINGS
H ALLER & FULLER
STATE STREET JEWELERS
, ,
d *+
Oxfords .Lead the
Vogue, for Sring
Since simplicity is the soul of good taste,
the newest oxfords, with their long graceful
lines, meet every demand for smartness.
We have just received several numbers
which hold a particular appeal to the college
woman. Onevis of dark brown calf. with mili-
tary heels. It is perfectly plain with simulated
toe, and depends for its attractiveness upon
grace of line.
Black calf fashions the other style, which
with its sensible heel and medium weight sole,
will be found most practical for campus wear.
$7.50,

I

They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT

THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(October 27, 2918)Y
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7: 0 a.
m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. rh, and every hour to 9:48 p. M. (Ex.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:05 p. in., 10:50 p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 1 :45 p. m., 12:20 a. m.
r :2o a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. Mn., to
12:20 a. M.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R

S14 S. State St.

Ann Arboi

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources..........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

I

0. D., MORRILL
Typewriters I.
Typewriting
Mimeographing

I

Has moved to
Niokels Arcade Phers 17
First Floor

I

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