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March 11, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-11

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THE WEATHER
NOT MUCH CHANGED IN
TEMPERATURE

A6P 41o
r
AlWi4t t limpp'll n

:I~ati

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX No. 111.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 1919.

PRICE THREE C

OIERTH ROW OFUS.
BOLSHEIKI .PLOT,
MAIS STABLISH
I. W. W., ANARCHISTS, RADICAS
AND SOCIALISTS
UNITE
FORE IGN ELEMENT IS
ACTIVE IN PROPAGANDA
Bold'Efforts Made to Orgnize Nation-
Wide Reign of Terror and
Revolution
(By Associated Press)
BULLETIN
Paris, March 10.-The supreme War
council today'finally adopted the mil-
itary terms of German disarmament.
These provide for an army of 100,000
men enlisted for 12 years.
BULLETIN
Berlin, March 10.-Murders, fight-
ing, and plundering continued
throughout Sunday in various parts
of the city. There was much fighting
from the roof. Many people were ex-
ecuted.
Washington, March 10. - Solicitor
General Lamar of the post office de-
partment submitted a memorandum to
the Senate Propaganda committee to-
day stating that the I. W. W., anarch-
ists, socialists, and others were "per-
fecting an amalgamation with one ob-
ject, the overthrow of the govern-
ment of the.United States by means
of a bloody revolution and the estab-
lishment of a Bolshevik republic."
Bolshevism Common Cause
Mr. Lamar said his conclusion was
based upon information contained in
seized mail matter. He said it was in-
significant that "this was the first
time in the history of the so-called
radical movement in the United States
that these radical elements have
found a common cause-Bolshevism-
In which they can all unite."
He referred particularly to the dis-
satisfied foreign elements as being
active in the propaganda.
Reign of Terror Plotted
Accompanying the memorandum
were several hundred pieces of the
mail matter. Mr. Lamar said this
propaganda was being conducted with
"such regularity that its magnitude
had been measured by the bold and
outspoken statements contained in
these publications and the efforts made
therein to organize a nation-wide
reign of teror and overthrow the gov-
ernment."
ALUMNAE OF ALL
COLLEGES TO MEET
Delegates from the 88 branches of
the National Association 8f Collegiate
Alumnae will meet in a biennial con-
vention March 31 to Aprl 3 in St.
Louis.
Women representing 74 American
colleges and universities and the larg-
er European colleges will be present.
This national organization has a total
membership of 10,000 women.
Important Buisness
Important busiess of a national
character will be brought upnat this
meeting, one of which will be the con-
sideration of changing the name V
the organization.
The local chapter of the association
will meet Saturday to discuss subjects

they wish to be introduced at this
meeting and also settle upon the dele-
gates who will represent Ann Arbor,
which may be allowed to have about
10 representatives.
ANN ARBOR RED CROSS IN
NEED OF KNITTED GARMENTS
The Red Cross society of Ann Arbor
is still In need of children's knitted
garments. Those that are needed most
are sweaters and stockings. The yarn
may be procured at the rooms at 608
Williams street.
Economics Professors Ill Last Week
Two members of the economics de-
partment, W. P. Calhoun and Prof.
F. E. Clark, have not been able to
teach their classes this last week be-
cause of slight illnesses. They will
probably resume their duties early this

HONORS TO JAMES
B. ANGELL, 3RD
Cambridge, Mass., March 10.-James
B. Angell, one of the most prominent
students in Harvard law school, was
elected chairman of the board of di-
rectors of the Harvard University Le-
gal Aid bureau after a very exciting
contest. Membership in this board is
one of the most coveted honors of
Harvard university.
Mr. Angell is a grandson of the
late Dr. James B. Angell, who was
president of the University of Michi-
gan for many years, and was presi-
dent of the literary class of 1916, be-
sides being a member of numerous
campus societies.
DELEGATIONS STUDY TAFT
PROPOSALS TO LEAGUE

"'Sleeping Sickness ' Is Found
Only In Africa"--lDean Vaughan
"Reports that a man in Jackson is suffering from 'sleeping sick-
ness' are untrue." says Dean Victor C. Vaughan of the Medical col-
lege. "That disease is found only in Africa," he says, "and the Jack-
son man has probably been afflicted with a peculiar inflammation of
the brain."
"This particular inflammation follows influenza," said Dr. Vaughan,
"and is not common. It is not necessabily fatal, although no cure has
ever been discovered. Good nursing and proper feeding are all that
can be done for the patient. No epidemics of it have ever been known."

PRESIDENT WILSON TO
FINAL JUDGMENT
DRAFTS

RENDER
ON

Paris, March 10.--The amendments
to the draft of the League of Nations
plan which have been proposed by
William Howard Taft are receiving
the close study of the various delega-
tions to the peace conference.
The understanding prevails that the
suggestions made by Mr. Taft might
be adopted if reassurance might be
had that the re-opening would not be
involved and that further amendments
will not be offered by other nations.
More Proposals Expected
It is generally admitted in well in-
formed circles, however, that some
French and Italian proposals are to
be expected. The ground is being can-
vassed carefully to secure further in-
formation on the points raised by Mr.
Taft pending the arrival of President
Wilson, who must render final judg-
ment on any American amendments to
the draft.
Germany's Army Status Fixed
Paris, March 10--The supreme coun-
cil at Its meeting today decided that
the representatives on the economic
and financial conditions of the powers
with special interests; who have been
the cause of much discussion should
be designated by the great powers.
Italy Decorates
f-Law, Y Worker
(By T. F. M.)
Among those returning from the va-
rious battlefields of Europe, Rollin
Winslow, '20L, comes back from the
Eastern Alps and the Asiago plateau,
where he served in the Italian lines
under famous Bersaglieri commanders
of Italy's shock troops.
Worked Under Fire
Winslow, who was one of the first
Americans serving with the Italian
forces, went directly to Italy some
time after the declaration of war as
a Y. M. C. A. field man. Among the
first Americans in the war to face the
fire of the Huns, he became attached
to troops of attack, and spent most
of his time working under bombard-
ment and machine gun fire in the ad-
vanced first lines.
During action Winslow was singled
out by the Italian commanders In the
great Italian attack, and decrated
both with the Italian Cross of War,
and the Italian Medal of Conduct un-
der Fire, being one of the few Amer-
icans to be so. honored by Latin peo-
ple.
Saw Important Engagements
While in service Winslow took part
in two great defeats and two great
victories besides numerous other
smaller engagements, helping to drive
the pride of the Austrian army out
of the mountains and into the riv-
ers-the last great catastrophe suffer-
ed by the central powers before the
fall of the Prussians.
Girls' Glee Club Rehearses Today
Regular rehearsal of the Girls' Glee
club will be held at 4:30 o'clock in
Barbour gymnaium. All members
must attend to practice the songs to
be sung at Martha Cook Sunday.
Ensign Sanders, e'19, Local Visitor
Ensign Louis L. Sanders, ex-'19, is
visiting in the city for afew days. En-
sign Sanders saw active duty on the
Atlantic coast previous to the signing
of the armistice.

COMMUNITY HOUSE
TOUOPEN MARCH 15'
Various Roons to be Furnished by
Fraternal Organizations
of City
WILL FORM CENTER FOR CIVIC
AND GRANGE ACTIVITIES
Ann Arbor's Community house will
open its doors to the public on Sat-
urday, March 15, with a reception for
residents of the city and county.
Its work as a civic center for city
and grange activities will begin next
-week, with classes for women, and
with lectures, a reading, resting and
sleeping rooms for any who wish to'
receive the hospitality of that organ-
ization. It is being supported by an
appropriation from the city council
and the combined efforts of women's
and fraternal oeganizations of the
county.
The Community house is being furn-
ished this week by these different -or-
ganizatioans, each of which is donating
the furniture for one room. The com-
mittee in control of the institution
will meet Wednesday afternoon at the
Community house to make detailed
plans for the opening, and regulations
upon which the house shall be con-
ducted thereafter.
A. A. FACTORY SUPPLIES
BALLS FOR WAR MACKIN ES

MOORE TO REPLACE
DIEEREIN CAS
Conflicting Engagements Make Ap-
lrearance of Dieterle an Im-
possibility
EXPENSE OF OPERA WILL MAKE
NECESSAllY CAPACITY HOUSE
Paul Moore, '22M, will play one of
the leads in "Come On Dad," in the
Union opera, instead of Robert Die-
terle, '21M, the original choice. Moore
made his Union opera debut in "A
Fools Paradise," and was one of the
hits of the show.
Dieterle has two conflicting profes-
sional engagements, it is said, and
can't be in Ann Arbor the night of the
first presentation, or accompany the
production on one of the road trips.
Expense is Great
The expense to which the Union is
put in producing an opera of the
class of "Come On Dad," is evidenced
by the budget compiled by the general
committee. It calls for expenditures
of $4,870. Here are the figures as
submitted:
Production director, $850; musical
director, $300; theater rental, $545;
orchestration, $100; general expenses,
$300; costumes-supplies, $50; rentals,
$1,500; wages, $25; properties-wig,
$120; scenery, $800; supplies, $100;
wages, $120; electrician, $60.
Full House Needed
In order to make the money counted
on every year from the opera, the
theater must be filled at every per-
formace.
NAVAL RESERVISTS
TO RECEIVE BONUS

TRY-OUTS TO DECIDE
GLEE CLUB FUTURE
The future of the University Glee
club depends on the outcome of the
try-outs at the studio of the director,
Theodore Harrison, in the University
School of Music at 7:30 o'clock this
evening.
Tenors are needed to make the club
a success. According to Mr. Harrison
there will be no club unless a number
of good tenors turn out: Good men
have been found for the other voices.
This is the last chance that will be
given those who work to try out. If a
sufficient number does not turn out,
there will consequently be no glee
club.
If the Glee club fails, there will al-
so be no Mandolin club, according to
Frank Taber, the director. The per-
sonnel of the Mandolin club will be
announced in The Daily soon if the
Glee club tryouts are successful.
WINNERS PICKED FROM
ORTRCL TRYOTS
CHOSEN TRYOUTS TO COMPETE
AGAIN IN CONTEST TOWARD
END OF MARH
Completing the class preliminary
contests in the Northern Oratorical
league, Alice Hoelzle, '19, won first
place with "The Voice of Armenia,"
in the senior contest held Monday
evening in Mason hall. Morris Par-
zen, '19, who presented "The Eternal
Fog," won se'cond, and Herbert Par-
zen, '19, was chosen as alternate.
In the'sophomore contest held Mon-
day afternoon, D. C. Shelton, '21, won
first place and Earl Miles, '21, was
picked as alternate. Shelton's selec-
tion was "The Battle of the Marne."
Carl G. Brandt, '211, E. O. Brink-
man, '20, and Clarence E. Scott, '20,
won first and second places and alter-
nate respectively in the contest for
juniors which Was held Saturday eve-
ning. Brandt spoke on "The German
Language in America," and Brinkman
on "An Economic Boycott of Ger-
many.".
Winners to Compete Later
The five who won first and second
places in the various contest will re-
ceive personal attention and direction
from now on to prepare them for com-
petition for University honors which
will be held the latter part of this
month, probably March 24 or 25. The
winner in this competition will .repre-
sent the University in the Northern
Oratorical league contest to be held
in May at Northwestern' university.
In the sophomore contest especially
was considerable, skill and ability in
oratory displayed.
J-LITS TO CHOOSE
COUNCILMEN. TODAY
Election of two student councilmen
to represent the Junior class of ! the
literary college will be held at 3:15
o'clock Tuesday afternoon in room
205 Mason hall. The two representa-
tives will be chosen from the follow-
ing three men who were nominated
at the last meeting: H. M. Carey, '20,
G. D. Anderson, '20, and W. W. Hin-
shaw, '20.
This will be an important election
and the councilmen should be chosen
for this office by a representative at-
tendance of the entire Junior literary
class.

HOME SERVICE MAKES REPORT
FOR JANUARY AND FEBRUARY
The Home Service section of the
Red Cross for Washtenaw county has
given out the following report for the
last two months.
For January: information given to
54 families; service given to 91 fami-
lies; total, 145, with the amount ex-
pended for relief $700.57.
For February: information given to
59 families; service given to 84 fam-
ilies; total 143, with amount expend-
ed for relief of families of $267.05.
"Y" to Present Movies Tonight
Bryant Washburn in "Till I Come
Back to You" will be the attraction
at the University Y. M. C. A. free mov-
ing picture entertainment to be held
at 7:30 o'clock Tuesday in Lane hall.
"'Y" Cabinet Members to Meet
Members ot the Y. M. C. A. cabinet
will meet at dinner at 6 o'clock Wed-
nesday night in Lane hall.

MICHIGAN BEATS
ILLINOIS 22-1
IN HARD CONTESI
MAIZE AND BLUE FIVE 'NEARt
.600 MARK IN BIG TEN
LE AGUE
RYCHENER SCORES FIVE
LONG FIELD BASKETS
Iowa Whips Wisconsin, 29 to 27, Tyin
Purdue for Sixth Place In
Conference Race
(By Associated Press)
Iowa City, Ia., March 10.-Iowa de
feated Wisconsin 29 to 27 here tc
night in a Western Conference baskel
ball game. Berrien and Cotton wer
the stars for Iowa, while Knapp an
Weston showed up for Wisconsin
Iowa's victory makes her tied wit
Purdue for sixth place with a poe
centage of .364.
(Special to The Michigan Daily)
Champaign, Ill., March 10 (via th
Associated Press).-Michigan won
third successive Western Conferenc
basketball game tonight by beating I
linois 22 to 18.
Wolverines Start in Slow
The Wolverines were slow at tb
start, but before the first period wa
half over, Coach Mitchell's men fouD
their shooting eye and managed I
gain a lead on the Suckers.
Every moment of the game depen
ed upon the shooting of a basket o
a foul by either team for a victor
score. It was not until five minut
before the end of the contest that t
Maize and Blue quintet were able I
forge four points ahead of the Ill
nois five, keeping the lead unil ti
referee's whistle signified the clos
of the game.
Rychener Stars for Michigan
Rychener, the speedy Michiga
guard, was the sensation of the even
ing, scoring five long field goals.
was his excellent basket throwing th
brought the Michigan five its we
earned victory.
(Michigan's standing in the B:
Ten is now .556. Illinois' percenta
is rated at the .417 mark. If Mich
gan is successful in the last game a
the season, that with Indiana,
Bloomington, Tuesday night, the fin
standing for the Wolverines in t
league will be .600, tying Northwes
ern for third place.)
Summaries
Michigan Pos. I111m
Hewlett ........ L.F........ Mittlem
Karpus ........ R.F.........Ingers
McClintock ......C............Wils
Rychener......R.G......... Tayl
Williams......L.G.......... Ko
Substitutes' for Michigan - Eme
for Karpus; for Illinois-Fletcher f
Mittleman; Smith for Fletcher. Fie
goals-Hewlett, 2; Karpus, 1; Ryche
er, 5; Williams, 1; Ingerson, 2;Mittl
man, 1; Taylor, 3. Foul throws-He'
lett, 4 out of 6; Wilson, 6 out of
Taylor, none out of 4. Referee, Re
nolds, Chicago Y. Time of halves,
minutes.
SOCIAL PROBLEMS
STUDIED BY CLU
An intelligent idea of the fund
mental causes responsible for t

present social upheaval is quite n
essary to understand the rapic
changing economic and social cond
tions as a consequence of the Won
War. The Intercollegiate Socialist s
ciety offers the opportunity to all w
wish to study and discuss all pro
lems pertaining to economic and s
cial phenomena.
- Prof. R. W. Sellars of the philos
phy department will speak on "Gu
Socialism" before the society at 7:
o'clock Wednesday evening in rob
P162 Natural Science building.
I. C. Jacobson Talks in Hqwell
Mr. R. C. Jacobson, director of si
dent activities at the Methodist Ep
a copal church, spoke last night at
"father and son'' banquet held
d Howell, Mich.
Michigan Men, from France, Here
William and Walter Nieman, '1
t and Lieut. Burton Hadley, '17E, all:r
- cently returned from France, a
visitors in the city.

HOOVER COMPANY EMPLOYS
DAY AND NIGHT FILLING
ORDERS
I____________

800

(By W. X. B.) Former naval unit men who w
When the last war clouds have disappointed when the war depa
passed and the roll of honor is made ment failed to give ut information
known it -will be found that the Hoov- gaingtoeg$ve ouhimiond
er Steel Ball company, Ann Arbor's garding the $60 bonus which is d
mos thivig eterris, hs dne tsto discharged and released men, m:
most thriving enterprise, has done its now entertain hopes of attending I
bit, that the wheels of the Allies' J-Hop or of indulging in othere
great war machine might run more pensive pleasures during the rema
smoothly. der of the term.
The local factory had been supply-
ing steel balls to some of the bellig- The Arcade Red Crss roomsr
in the war but ion this ceived information on the bonus que
erents earlyiti
country's entry into the struggle the tion Monday. Naval and Marine cr
need of balls on which the nation's men may apply to the Disbursing 0
implements of war must roll was felt. cer Supplies and Accounts Bure
The Hoover company responded imme- Navy Department, Washington, D.
diately and in a comparatively short It is necessary only to enclose V
time was going full blast with a force release with a letter applying for
of over 800 working night and day. j bonus. In case the release has bei
of oer 00 wrkig nght nd ay. lost it will be necessary to get a
Steel balls were made in every size, lstewillmbeadcsartos.
from those of one thirty second of an plicate from headquarters.
inch in dianeter, weighing a fraction Itis suggested that the releases
of an ounce, for use in airplane motor registered with the county clerk
magnetos to those eight inches in di- fore sending them.
ameter and weighing 75 pounds, to bet
used, inmontnting the greatdnaval At Last! C.O.D .
guns, with which the final drive of
the war was opened.
(Continued on Page Six)

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SERVICE KEYNOTE
OF BUSINESS TALK
Speaking Sunday afternoon at Lane
hall on the subject of "Business Ad-
ministration," Prof. I. Leo Sharfman
of the economics department declared
that business has become more than
a money making scheme, and by in-
corporating the element of service,
has entered the realm of community
interests.
"Though the college man may be
compelled to accept a position at a
tow figure 'when he starts out into the
world," said Professor Sharfman, "his
general knowledge will soon advance
him in the ranks." In this connection
he advised that students should carry
no grudge against the professor who
held them to their task, for the busi-
ness world would demand faithfulness,
accuracy, axid thoroughness similar to
that which they had gained in col-
lege.

"You're all wrong, Mabel, you're all
wrong," said the senior wearing a "C.
O. D." tag to "la pettite jeuene fille"
of the class of 1922.' "It isn't an in-
vitation to dance, nor an indication
that I am a cub on The ,Daily, nor
even a public notice of what I am do-
ing to dad in order that I can take
you to the J-Hop."
"Then I really can't imagine what
it all means, Horace," cooingly and
questioningly replied 1. p. j. f.
"Well then, categorically articulat-
ing, it is a cryptic connotation of that
theatrical production which the Mimes
of the Michigan Union are to use as a
vehicle for the ostentatious display of
the histronic abilities of some three
score of their fellow Thespians," re-
joined Horace, lapsing into the lingo
of Pi Beta Kappa.
"So these tags means that-?"
"The name of the Union opera is
"'Come On, Dad'."

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