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March 09, 1919 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ROH 9, 1919. THE MICHIGAN DAILY YAUI

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MICHIGA' CHICGO
MEET HARDFOUGH
Carl Johnson Takes 1 Points; Is Big
Factor in Wolverine
Victor
DISTANCE EVENTS WON BY
MAROONS BECAUSE OF TRACK
Exceptional hurdling and jumping
by Carl Johnson gave Michigan the
the deciison over Chicago in a dual
meet in Bartlett gymnasium, Friday
night, by a score of 44 to 33.
The big Maize and Blue star won
three firsts,the 50 yard dash, the 60
yard high, hurdles, and the running
high jump. This continuance of his
remarkable showing of last year and
of the Notre Dame meet this season
makes his place as one of the best of
college athletes most secure.
Pat Smith returned to top form and
won the shot put with a heave of 40
feet, 7 inches. This is nearly a foot
better than he went last week when
he took second to Gilfllin in Water-
man gym. Walls, who placed close
behind Smith, was appearing in his
second meet and looks to have plenty
of ability in pushing the iron ball
around the lot.
Triple Win for 50 Yards
Michigan's sprinters repeated their
triple win in the 50 yard dash. As
in the Notre Dame meet, Johnson led
the field, winning in 5 4-5 seconds,
Cook, was ,a close second and Losch
third.
Cross and Westbrook lived up to
advance dope and took first and
second, " respectively, in the pole
vault. The Chicago entry was out-
classed from the start and soon fell
out.
Johnson was the only Michigan
mn entered in the height hurdles
and high Jump. He was pressed by
Williams, the Maroon basketball star,
in the latter event but managed to
win at 5 feet, 10 inches.
Chicago Takes Distance 'Runs
Chicago collected their points in
the distance . runs. Sedgwick gave
McCosh a fast race in the mile but
lost out at the finish, where the Chi-
cago. captain's sprint proved too
greatr
Kennedy and Speers won the 440
and half mile, respectively, in fairly
slow time from 'Butler and Buell. The
relay was won by the crack Maroon
quintet in 3 minutes, 24 seconds.
Summary:
50 yard dash-first, Johnson (M);
second, Cook (M); third, Losch (M);
time, 5 4-5 seconds.
60 yard hurdles-first, Johnson (M);
second, Ames (C); third, Annas (d)
Shot put-first, Smith (M); second,
Walls (M); third, Gorgas (C) ; dis-
tance, 40 feet 7 inches.
Pole vault-first, Cross (M); sec-
ond, Westbrook (M); third, Annan
(C); height, °11 feet 3 inches.
High jump-first, Johnson (M); sec-
ond, Williams (C); third, Annan (C);
height 5 feet 10 inches.
Mile-first, McCosh (C); second,
Sedgwick (M); third, Lewis (C);
time, 4:35.
Halt mile-first, Speer (C); second,
Buell (M); third, Greene (C) ; time,
2:08.
440 yard dash-first, Kennedy (C)
second, Butler (M); third, Harris (C);
time 57 2-5 seconds.
Relay-won by Chicago. Time, 3:24.
- - - - -ng

George Sisler Predicts Victorious
Wal Team For Pichigan This Year

"Michigan's 1919 baseball team is
bound to be a winner," was the com-
ment uttered by George Sisler, who
was recently honorably discharged
from the army, when he visited Ann
Arbor several weeks ago.
"The team looks good," Sisler said,
"and it ought to bring home the ba-
con this year. Practically all of the
old men are back in school.
"With Parks back on the pitching

staff the Wolverines have a rieucleus
ofr a good team. He is one of the
best pitchers Michigan has this year-
infact, I believe he is better than
Ruzika, for he has more steam and a
better assortment of curves balls."
Sisler is with the St. Louis Browns
this year, and is now in winter train-
ing. e has gained five pounds since he
enlisted in the army. Sisler was pre-
pared to leave for over-seas when the
armistice was signed.

MICHIGAN MAY
GAIN .600 MARK
Pep was the keynote of the base-
ball practice in the gymnasium Sat-
urday afternoon and Coach Lundgren
was pleased with the spirit and the
number of turnouts for te first Satur-
day workout.
That surety of fielding and accu-
racy of throwing which the men are
gradually, developing does the heart
good and, the snap that the pill chas-
ers are showing this early in the sea-
son should make the baseball mentor's
mind rest easy.
There were as many or more men
out yesterday afternoon than have
shown up for any practice so far. The
veterans are keeping up the good work
and of the new men Van Boven looks
like a world-beater. He played with
1920 All-fresh nine but was ineligible
last year, however the class he has
been' displaying this season proves
that he has not lost anything by last
spring's inactivity.
Onei more man has joined the de-
pleted ranks of the backstop squad,
Schluntz reporting for work Saturday.
If a few more catchers would ap-
pear the one thorn in the Coach's
side would be well toward elimina-
tion.
The Milwaukee baseball club of the
American association is attempting
to get women to attend the games to
make the national pastime a cleaner
sport.
Carl Johnson, Michigan's present
track star, is a product of Spokane,
Wash.

AMERICA IS HOST
AT FRENCH GAMES
According to The Stars and Stripes
of Feb. 14, President Wilson and Gen-
eral Pershing have notified the exec-
utive committee of the Inter-Allied
Olymic meet to be held next June in
France; that they will each offer a
trophy for the big games.
President Wilson's cup will be
awarded the country which scores'
the highest total in general field
events, while General Pershing's tro-
phy will go to the winning rifle shoot-1
in team.
The first two trophies thus come;
from the United States, who will act.
as host at the world games. The gift
of the President brings to mind his
loyal support of athletics and Gen-1
eral Pershing's donation for rifle ex-
cellency is especially significant of
his behalf in the effectiveness of this
weapon in war.
The great stadium which is now be-
ing erected at Joinville-le-Pont for the
international meet will bear the name
of "Pershing Field" and will be pre-
sented to the French on the comple-
tion of the games.
WARNING! Don't lose your money
making poor investments. Invest with
Huron Valley Bldg. & Sav. Asso. Ab-
solutely safe. Pays 6 percent. foney
loaned on Real Estate. H. H. Herbst,
Secretary, Savings Bank Bldg.-Adv.

COURT TEAM SUCCESSFUL
DISPITE HARD SEASON
PERSONNEL CHANGES OFTEN
WITH RETURN OF 1918
STARS
Michigan's 1919 Varsity team, now
being put to the final test on its trip
south, has had many ups and downs
during the seasoi. There were times
when the situation was decidedly dis-
couraging and moments of extreme
felicitation when it seemed that the
Maize and Blue men were going to
hold the .1000 average which they held
at the beginning of the season.
The squad has seen many changes
in its personnel during its existence.
At the beginning of the year it was
necessary for Coach Mitchell to is-
sue several calls for candidates with
scarcely any result. The team had
only one veteran, Hewlett. The rest
of the 1918 men had graduated or an-
swered the call to the colors.
Williams and Wilson Good
Two of the 1918 All-fresh squad
showed promise in the way of good
basketball material. They were Wil-
son and Williams, a guarding combi-
nation, who had been working to-
gether for years, having played on
the same preparatory school team.
The only other old men present at
the first practices were Cohn; Car-
pus, and Borinstein. This turnout
was in a way satisfactory but what
the coach wanted most was the sup-
port of men with more experience.
Weiss, of last years' freshman
team, and Rychener, of the 1918 Var-
sity squad, arrived a while after the
season had started and strenghthen
the line-up considerably.
I Captain Emery Returns
The advent of Emery and McClin-
tock in January was the final big
boost theteam received. There is no
doubt that the addition of these two
men, together with the improvement
of the team generally, due to practice,
has accounted a great deal for the
way in which Michigan has come
through this far with a creditable
record.
Doc Emery was elected captain last
year and his appearance gave the team
the leadership which is necessary to
any kind of success. Williams, who
had discharged the duties of chief un-
til Emery's arrival, was unusually ca-
pable.
Michigan Leader Graduates
This is the last season that Emery

ARCADE
Today and Tomorrow
Geraldine Farrar
Supported by MILTON SILLS and TOM SANTSCHI in
"SHADOWS"
By WILLARD MACK

will play with the Michigan as he
graduates in June, and Coach Mitchell
worked him hard to get him into.
shape to take part in every possible
game. His work in the last few games
has begun to show the ability which
he possessed at the close of the 1918
season.
Coach Mitchell has built up an un-
usually strong team considering the
disadvantages with' which he had to

contend. It was not known
nitely, until after the demobilial
the S. A. T. C., whether it wot
possible to organize a team.
then it was hard to tell what
rial would orwould not be on
at any moment. But a team w.
ganized that has done credit to
igan.
Daily want ads orng results

First You See Her
As a Dancing Girl
of Alaska and next
as a Gorgeously
Gowned Woman

of New York.

Miss Farrar has a
new role in this
drama of Eastern
Days and Alaskan
nights.

FARRAR I'
.in PIN
SHADOWS

_

NOW

IS THE

TIME

DANCING q
At the Packard Academy
Monday and Thursday 8 to 10
Also private instruction in the
steps. Phone 1850-F-1.-Adv.

every
P. M.
latest.

TO BRING IN YOUR

Wednesday--Ethel Barrymore in "The Divorcee"
Thursday--Friday--Nazimova in 'An Eye for an Eye'
Two extra matinees at 4:30 and 5:45 every Fri
day, Saturday and Sunday.
MICHIGAN TAILORING COMPANY
901 N. University Ave. Cor. N. Univ. and Ingalls, Opposite Hill Auditorium
SPRING AND SUMMER SUITS
$18 to $50 Goods nolv on display
LADIES' DEPARTMENT
entire second floor for Dressmaking and Fine Tailoring. A Solution
for cleaning Fur Coats of the best quality at a reasonable price. Try
this new oderless solution for taking the SHINE out of your suits.
As a trial we will only charge you half price. Guaranteed by one of
the leading firms of Chicago, Ill. .We will call for your goods over
Phone 2734-W.
We buy your discarded suits
Cleaning and Pressing at reasonable prices
Open 7:30 a. m. to 9 p. m.
W. L. SLEDGE, Proprietor

Tennis Racket

Brain, workers will be surprised to'
find how much easier it is to study
if they take their meals at the Cafe-
teria. The great variety of salads,
vegetables, deserts, and pastry make
meat unnecessary and the pure in-
gredients and special preparation is
conducive to clear thinking and brain
power. You get expensive food at a
low cost.-Adv.

FOR RESTRINGING

GEO. J. MOE "Sport Shop"
711 N. University Ave.

. U,

p
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From the first measuring to the finished suit every detail

SAVE THE PIECES
Broken Eye Glass Lenses Ground in Our Own Shop. Same Day. Try Our Service.
Lyjes Lxa mined
STATE STREET
HA LLER FULLER JEWELERS
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Tailors to Men

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"Don't Change
Your Husband"

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of our tailoring will be found pleasant and satisfactory. Wide
choice of exclusive fabrics will be yours-perfect fit and style

We have a very exclusive line of.

guaranteed.

Foreign

and

Domestic woolens for

Clothes
May not
Make the Man"
-But a-
MARQUARDT SUIT
Certainly help s
We guarantee both woolens
and workmanship
See Us Today
"Art" Marquardt
Campus Tailor
6081. Liberty

The world of well dressed men are visitors here.

WhyI

not become one of the members?

your Spring Suits and Overcoat.

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AFTER WAR PRICES

G. H. WILD COMPANY
LEADING MERCHANT TAILORS

$30.00 TO $50.00

9

ENRY & o..
715 N. University Ave.

STATE STREET

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