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March 09, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-09

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THE WEATHER
POSSIBLY SNAW;

A6V
4iftr4t #an

ju1Iaitg

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE.

VOL. XXIX. No. 110. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 1919. PRICE THREE CENT

RAYMOND ROBINS
RUSSIA'S ENVOY,
RANCIS ASSERTS
RED GROSS, WORKER BRINGwS
BOLSHEVIKI PROPOSAUS
TO WILSON
INTENDED TO CONVINCE
PRESIDENT IN AN HOUR
Present Russian giovernment Would
PermitG ermny to Regain
Strength in Decade
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 8.-Ambassador
Francis, recently returned from Rus-
sia, testified before the senate propo-
ganda committee that he was inform-
ed that Raymond Robins, former head
of the American Red Cross mission in
Russia, had returned to the United
States as a courier of the Bolshevik
government, with a proposal for Pres-
ident Wilson.
From a source which he regarded
as reliable, Mr. Francis said he heard
that Mr. Robins brought documents in
which the Bolshevik leaders offered,
under certain conditions, to make con-
cession t6 the United States similar
to those given by Germany in the
Orest-Litovak treaty.
Missed Seeing President
In supporttof this information the
Ambassador told the committee that
he had heard Mr. Robins, as the later
was leaving Russia, tell an Associated
Press correspondent that if he could
.getan hour's conversation with the
President he could bring about recog-
nition of the Bolshevik government.
The ambassador said that so far as
he knew Mr. Robins did not get an
opportunity to see the President.
Former Red Cross Head
Mr. Francis, who went to Russia in
1916 before the overthrow of the mon-
archy and who remained there until
after the Bolsheviki had seized
the government, warned that should
the Bolsheviki be permitted to remain
In power in Russia, Russia would be
exploited by the Germans. Within
10 years after such condition, Ger-
many he said, would be victor of the
war.
That nation then would be stronger
in every way than it was in 1914.
Returning Ex- '19
Ranks As Seniors
"All students who, because of war
service, will not be able to complete
their courses until Feb., 1920, and
who would otherwise have graduated
with the present senior literary class
are to be considered members of the
class of '19, and can take part in its
activities. Otherwise, these men would
lose all touch with events connected
with Commencement and the associa-
tion with their fellow classmates of
the first three years.
The first official meeting of the
class has been called at 4 o'clock on
Tuesday, March 11, in room 101 eco-
nomics building by L. A. Lundquist,
president. Speakers for Class day ex-
ercises are to be chosen and the
question of a senior memorial will
come upfor discussion. Every mem-
ber of the class of '19 is urged to think
over nominations for class historian,
orator prophet and poet

LIT MEET CHANGED
J-lit class meeting for elec-
tion of Student councilmen will
be held at 3:15 o'clock Tues-
day afternoon in room 205
Mason hall instead of Monday,
as previously announced.

MICHIGAN TO END
GAMES NEAR TOP
Ohio State was demoted to last place
in the Big Ten basketball race as the
resurt of Michigan's victory last
night. The winnings of Iowa and Wis-
consin over Northwestern and Chica-
go,'respectively, makes Iowa and Wis-
consin tied to seventh place in the
league.
If Michigan wins both of its games
with Illinois and Indiana next week
the Wolverines will be tied with
Northwestern for third place. If, on
the other hand, the Maize and Blue
five , breaks even in the next two
games, the final standing for the
Michigan quintet will be .500.
S O U N DPSE N E R E PA' '0E S I

"VERBAL MESSAGE WILL
MAINTAIN PERMANENT
PEACE"

NOTI

MUNICIPAL BEACH
TO BE1ENLARE
Locker and Bathho use A ceoo noda-
Lionis to be .More Than Doubled
Next Spring
WORK T0 START ON IMPROVING
AND ENLARGING BEACH AT ONCE
Ann Arbor's municipal bathing
beach will accommodate 1,000 people
this comming spring.
Work on improving and enlarging
the beach, just above the boat house,
which was opened in the middle of
last summer, will start as soon as the
weather permits so that it will be in
readiness for the "first in."
The early opening of the beach this
year will give University students a
chance to us it before vacation. It
was not opened until late in July last
year.
The improvements will consist of
enlarging the beach to double it's
present size, more than doubling the
locker and bath house accommoda-
tions which last year took care of 400
daily in the warm weather, improve-
ment in the apparatus, and to stretch
life lines at the deep waterline.
The beach affords diversion for
every one, sand piles and shallow
water for the "kiddies," diving boards
and platforms for those so inclined
and a long stretch of deep water for
long distance swimming.
CORNELL TO HAVE TICKET
BOOTH FOR VACATION TRAVEL
Cornell- Arrangements have been
completed for the establishment of a
railroad ticket office to be placed on
the Cornell campus before their vaca-
tion begins. Railroad and pullman
tickets for al ltrains leaving Ithaca
will be on sale at this booth.
Colorado Snowslide Wreeks Engine
Denver, March 7.-Swept from the
rails when struck by a snowslide
near Sapinero, Colo., the engine on a
Denver and Rio Grand train fell on
the ice of Gunnison river. No one
was injured.

GOlF, SENIOR LAW
SOCIETY, PICKS B
Honorary, of Old Legal Traditions,
Makes Annual Elections to
Membership
PLANS FOR INITIATION AND
BANQUET ANNOUNCED LATER
Elections to the Order of the Coif,
the senior law society, were held Fri-
day afternoon, resulting in the selec-
tion of the following last year legal
students: E. D. Dickinson, C., L.
Kaufman, Leon Greenebaum, C. L.
Goldstein, E. D. Kirkby, and A. J.
Levin.
The Order of the Coif is the nation-
al law honor society, corresponding
to Phi Beta Kappa in academic work.
Traditions of legal antiquity and Ju-
dicial lore are embodied in the ac-
tivities of the lawyer fraternity. The,
ancient customs of early courts and
Lincoln's Inn, together with the bar-
hister life of old London and colonial
New England are preserved as part
of the romantic history of the Law,
in the Order of the Coif.
Plans for the coming initiation and
banquet have not yet been announced.
OPERA'S TOTAL COST
TO NEAR $8,000 MARK
STUDENTS GUESS AS TO PROFITS
OF YEARLY UNION PRO-
DUCTION
How much money did the Opera
make? This is a question asked every
year after the Union production, and
the guesses most students venture are
a good many hundred do,lalrs more
than the true figure.
This year, following the policy of
informing the campus on everything
connected with the ope.ra, the Union
has made the budget public, so that
students and faculty members can un-
derstand the expense to which the
'Union is put in producing an opera
of the class of "Come On Dad."

MUSIC REHEARSALS
BEGIN THIS WEEK
Glee and Mandolin club try-outs
have been closed, and the clubs will.
begin rehearsals this week. There are
still several vacancies, however,rin
both clubs, especially among the first
tenor section of the Glee club.
Individual try-outs will be given
any student wishing to go out for the
clubs if he will communicate with
Theodore Harrison, director of the
Glee club, or Frank Taber, director
of the Mandolin club. There are good
opportunities forseveralamen in the
Mandolin club as well as the Glee
club, according to Mr. Taber. Guitars
are scarce, and several men may try
out for that section.
MICHIGANEINSIAN ON SALE
AFTER SPRING VACTION

WOLVERINES WHIP
OHIOANS IN GAME
FULL OF THRILL5
MITCELL'S MEN OVERCOME BIG
LEAD AND WIN FRACAS
BY 23-20 SCORE
KARPUS STAR OF RALLY
NEAR END OF CONTEST
Wisconsin Defeats Maroons, 25 to 15;
Northwestern Succumbs to
Iowa Quintet
Chicago, aMrch 8 (via the Associated
Press) .Wisconsin defeated Chicago
25 to 15 in the losers' final Western
Conference basketball game of the
season.
Iowa City, Ia., March 88 (via the
Associated Press).-Iowa won from
Northwestern 28 to 12 in a Western
Conference basketball game here to-
night. Berrien and Cotton, for Iowa,
and Marquardt and Wilcox, for North-
western, lead in the scoring.

TO

BE FIRST COLLEGE ANNUAL
TO APPEAR THIS YEAR IN
THE COUNTRY

(By Associated Press) t,
New York, March 8.-Major-General
Leonard Wood, commander to the
central department, in a public ad-
dress today warned the American pub-
lic not to let "anything, whether a
League of Nations, a Hague Tribu-
nal, or an international arbitration
system, replace a policy of sound na-
tional preparedness, "if the country is
to remain in a state of peace."
The general declared that "a verbal
message however skillfully applied
will not maintain a permanent peace."
He reiterated his well knownstand
for universal military training as-
serting that whatever may be said
by, its opponents there was "nothing
bad against it."
Demobllization Dangerous
Referring to the period of demobili-
zation as the most dangerous of the
war General Wood urged "practical,
kindly consideration" of the problem
of unemployed soldiers.
DEAN MATHEWS TO
TALK AT LANE HALL
Immediately after the services this
evening at the Methodist church, Dr.
Shailer Mathews, dean of the divinity
school at the University of Chicago
will speak on "America and World
Peace," at Lane hall.
Taking the form of the student's
open forum, the meeting will be free
to the men and women of the Univer-
sity and an opportunity will be given
for questions and an informal dis-
cussion. As the affair will be conduct-
ed under the auspices of the Cosmo-
politan club. Dr. Mathews, who has
lived in many parts of the world, es-
pecially in China and Japan, will
speak as a 'true cosmopolitan upon
the political and educational phase
of the peace propositions.
While in the Orient, Dr. Mathews
was signally honored by both the Jap-
anese and the Chinese, so that his
name is perhaps as well known to the
students from the Far East at Mich-
igan, as the native born Americans.
Of late years Dr. Mathews has oc-
cupied the presidencies of the Feder-
ated Council of Churches and the
Northern Baptist Convention. The
address will begin at 9 o'clock.
COMEDY CLUB PICKS
SIX NEW MEMBERS
try-outs held for Comedy club Sat-
urday morning resulted in the follow-
ing elections to membership:
Hilda K. Haggerty, '19; Elizabeth
B. Oakes, '20; Paul H. Shinkman, '20;
Marian I. Bath, '21; Caroline H. Na-
pier, '22; Russell S. Persing, '22E.
BASKETBALL SCORES
M1Ichigan, 23; 0. S. U. 20.
Iowa, 28; Northwestern, 12.
Wiaconsin, 2.5; Chicago, 15.

Library Reading Room To3e l
Quiet And Conducive To Study

The 1919 Michiganensian has gone
to press, and it is expected that it
will go on sale immediately after
Spring vacation. Every effort is be-
ing made to rush the work so that
the Michiganensian will be the first
college annual to appear in the coun-
try this year.
The work of the staff has been
greatly retarded by the unsettled con-
dition of,-the University and the re-
sulting impossibility of securing data
and material. Organizations have
been slow in getting in their copy, and
classes have been unable to have pic-
tures taken until the last minute. Be-
sides this, many students have return-
ed to school during the second semes-
ter, and the staff has delayed the pub-
lication so that the late-comers could
be represented.
The unavoidable change in plans
of the board in. control of student
publications also handicapped the
staff. Early in the Fall it was de-
cided to publish three editions. Lat-
er this was changed to two editions,
and when the armistice was signed,
back to the usual one edition. \The
work had to be repeated and mate-
rial re-arranged completely.
PROF. I. L. SHARFMAN
TO SPEAK TWICE AT Y
When a public speaker, getting
through one speech in the after-
noon, delivers another in the evening,
he undoubtedly deserves the title
"popular."
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman, of the eco-
nomics department, will speak on
"Business Administration" before the
"Y" at 3 o'clock this afternoon at
Lane hall, and will address the Me-
norah society at 8 o'clock in the red
rom of Lane hall.
Professor Sharfman is vice-presi-
dent of the Intercollegiate Menorah
society and one of the founders of
the first chapter of this organization
at Harvard. He has frequently address-
ed the Menorah society at the Uni-
versity in years past and will consti-
tute the first speaker on the new
Menorah program which the society
has recently resolved on during its
reorganization for the remainder of
the school year.
Following Professor Sharfman's
talk, there will be a short business
meeting, in which two members of
the executive board will be elected.
Present Conference Standing

(M. K. E.)I
Beneath a vaulted ceiling ornate
with classic rosettes, and encompass,
ed within walls along which extends
an almost unbroken line of book
stacks, will be the main reading room
of the new Library-the room which
faculty men expect to become the fos-
tering place of the studious mind.
The assumption that the hall will
be conducive to study is based on
the presence of two factors which will
co-operate in giving it that silence
and uninterrupted quiet so needed but
so lacking in the reading rooms now
used. A floor of cork inlay will mini-
mize the sounds of tramping feet,
while the removal to a separate room
of the call and delivery desks will
eliminate the disturbances created in
the requisitioning and handing out of
books.
The card indices and desks will be
located at the rear of the main read-
ing room, so that boks may be secur-
ed before the student enters therein.
In the main reading room there will

be but one small desk over which one
attendant will preside as general in-
formant and supervisor.
The stacks along ther walls will
contain books of much the same char-
acter as of those which now line the
walls of the present reading room.
The more extensive space, however,
will permit of a greater number of
volumes being placed within easy
reach of the reader.
At the east and west ends of the
hall are two alcoves in which will be
hung two mural paintings formerly
used in another University building.
The room extends over the entire
width of the second floor of the new
building, being approximately 168 feet
in length and 46 feet wide, and the
apex of the arched ceiling is 50 feet
above the floor level. Large windows
covering almost completely the upper
halves of the west, north, and east
walls will give ventilation and light
during the day, while indirect light-
ing fixtures will supply illumination
at night.

Wolverines Rally Near End
(Special to The Michigan Daily)
Columbus, 0., Mar-8 (via the Asso-
ciated Press).-Michigan won a West-
ern Conference basketball game here
tonight from Ohio State by a score
of 23 to 20.
The winning of tonight's contest by
the Maize and Blue quintet places the
Wolverines in fourth place in the Big
Ten basketball league, demoting the
Buckeyes to last place.
Ohio Gets 13-7 Lead
Ohio State managed to get a lead
of six points over the Mitchell five
by the end of the first period of the
game, the score being 13 to 7 in favor
of the Buckeyes.
At the opening of the second pe-
riod of the fracas Michigan staged
one of the greatest comebacks ever
seen this year. Karpus, the star Wol-
verine ofrward, was responsible for
the rally toward the end of the con-
test, that was most effective.
Game Full of Thrills
From the start of the second period
until the whistle blew at the close
of the game, never a moment passed
without thrills for the spectators. The
Wolverines gradually cut down the
lead, until a few minutes before the
end of the contest, Coach Mitchell's
proteges managed to tie their oppo-
nents.
A minute later a Wolverine shot a
basket, and a foul. The quintet was
able to defend the basket until the
end of the game.
"Nay Ilja nce?
Taboo At Mixer
"May I dance with you?" said the
freshman who was bold of heart to
the maid who was pretty of face -yes-
terday at the All-fresh mixer.
"No, indeed, sir," she said, "I have
not been formally introduced."
Whence the yearling Lothario,
sought out the yellow-ribboned com-
mitteeman and met the girl, according
to Hoyle and the new regulations that
are being used for mixers.
More than 600 people were there.
Whether they were all- freshmen or
not cannot be sworn to. Some of the
upperclass men could not resist com-
ing out and writing his name on the
program of some pretty little fresh-
man, and again no one will refuse the
junior girl who came to start over
again by meeting some of the dashing
younger set.
This first attempt of the freshman to
mix was'such a triumph that another
"formal party" is being planned for
the near future, where the verdants
will again come, meet and dance.

WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
SHAILER MAT H E W S
Dean of the Divinity School of the University of Chicago
"THE AMERICAN 'SPIRIT IN ACTION"

Team W
Minnesota..............10
Chicago .................10
Northwestern ............ 6
TiOCi ga ............... 4
Illinois .................. 5
Purdue ......... ......... 3
Iowa .................... 3
Wisconsin................3
Indiana ................. 2
Oho State .............. 2

L
0
2
4
4
6
7
7
7
6
7

Pctg
1.000
.833
.600
.500
.455
, .364
.300
.300
.250
.222

TONIGHT
7:30

Methodist Church

TONIGHT
7:30

II. II'

4

------------- -

1 - o l

SUNDAY
March 9.
3:00 P. M.

Christian Science Lecture
BY
Wim. D. Kilpatrick, C. S. of Detroit

Sarah
Caswell Angell
Hall
ADMISSION
FREE

U

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