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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 08, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.It IL XVIXM

l r 9i iri i. ttn ttilg

--------------

-I

The Guillotine

1 .

OFFICIAL, NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the university year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
NIEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
so the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and also the local news pub-
lished herein.
E;ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
iichigan, as Second class natter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words,
d signed, the sigaature not necessarily to ap-
pear in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
notices of events will be published in The
Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
consideration. No manuscript will be re-
turned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
sentiments expressed in the communications.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Clarence Roeser...........Managing Editor
H. C. L. Jackson................City Editor
Harry M. Carey...............News Editor
Bruce Millar...............'elegraph Editor
Milton Marx ........ .......Associate Editor
David B. ILandis..............Sport Editor
Marguerite Clark..........Women's Editor
Martha Guernsey...........Women's Editor
Charles R. Osius, Jr...........State Fditor
Mark K. Ehlbert............Efficiency Editor
Ruth Dailey...............Exchange Editor'
ISSUE EDITORS
Edgar L. Rice Henry O'Brien
Joseph A. Bernstein Renaud Sherwood
Paul G. Weber E. D. Flintermann
Paul A. Shinkman

Your Tears
(As Tagore Might Have Written It)
The light of the sun ripples like rest-
less tiny shuttles weaving golden
tapestry.
I have heard the liquid murmur of
the river thru the darkness of
midnight.
Your eyes are like two silver stars
gleaming across the desert of
Tepantar.
Like pink roses your cheeks glisten
with the dew of your sorrow.
My heart cries out in pain.

FIRST
METHODIST CHURC
QUO VADIS
(8 Reels)
TONIGHT at 7:30
TOMORROW
AT NOON
Prof. T. C. Trueblood
COLLEGE MEN'S CLASS
"LEAGUE OF NATIONS"
6:30 o'clock
EARL W. DUNN '20
Wesleyan Guild Meeting
7:30 oclock
SHAILER MATHEWS
of the University of Ch cago
"The American Spirit in Action"
Students Welcome:

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0t~111 ce1

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THE "STANDARD Stands Alone

(As Irving Berlin Might Have
Written It)
Dry your eyes, my honey, dry your
little eyes of blue,
You're my sweetest, neatest little
baby.
Weep no more, my honey, to you
ever I'll be true,
We will live in Honolulu maybe.
Every time you cry I feel a shiver
down my spine;
Every tear you drop is far more
precious, dear, than wine.
Take my ukelele, quiet all your fears,
You nearly drive me nutty with your
tears.

The board of representatives of the
Women's league will meet at 9 o'clock
Saturday morning in Barbour gym-
nasium. Mrs. Florence Bush, head of
the occupational theraupy department
of Detroit, will address the meeting.
The purpose of this department is to
train disabled soldiers.
Girls on probabtion who have not
seen Dean Myra B. Jordan should do
so before March 14. Dean Jordan is
in her office in Barbour gymnasium
Irmn S to 12 o'clock.
Senior and sophomore basketball
tc ms will practice at 4:50 o'clock
Moday afternoon in Barbour gym-
naiit.
Is. F. F. Woodward, chaperone of
the Delta Gamma sorority and Miss
Airtha Hills, social director of Kent
'omse, will chaperone the dance at
the Union Saturday evening.
BE INDEPENDENT OF "DAD"
Earn your own spending money.
Turn your spare time into dollars.
Just a few more places open. Give
phone. Address Dollars care of Daily
-Adv.

Loose Leaf Note Book

don't stop short of the

"Standard"- It positively has no equal-All sizes,

and everyone guaranteed.

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

When purchasing a

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Dont Fail to Visit Our New Lunch Room

i

(As It Would

REPORTERS
Philip Ringer Mary D. Lane
Margaret Christie Ena Apel
Marie Crozier Irene Ellis
Herbert R. Slusser j. P. Hart
Calton F. Wells
BUSINESS STAFF
Harold Makinson .........Business Manager
Agnes L. Abele......Asst. Business Manager
LeGrand A. Gaines...Asst. Business Manager
Win. M. LeFevre.....Asst. Business Manager
Wm. A. Leitzinger...Asst. Business Manager
Donald M. Major. .. Asst. Business Manager
Donnell R. Schoffner..Asst. Business Manager
SFNIOR STAFF
Mark B. Covell Edward Priehs, Jr.
Robert g. McKean Henry Whiting II
George A. Cadwell
JUNIOR STAFF
Curt P. Schneider Isabelle Farnuin
harold P. Lindsay Duiane Mier
:Maynard A. Newton Geo. R. Stimbek, Jr.
R. A. Sullivan
SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 1919.
Issue Editor-Hugh W. Hitchcock
UNIVERSITY AND COLLEGE
Extreme loyalty to his particular
college has always been a trait of the
university man. Students in the liter-
ary college look on the engineers with
scorn, as being far from the higher
education, while the engineers return
the compliment With the remark that
the lits never did a real day's work
in their lives.
The laws consider themselves in-
finitely better than any others. The
medics are so engrossed in their work
that they hardly recognize the exist-
ence of the rest of the campus. So it
is with almost every department in
the University.
Loyalty to department or college is
laudable. But the loyalty should not
stop there. The different colleges to-
gether form the University, and it is
to the Univesity that most allegiance
should be given.
We are Michigan men first, and eng-
ineers, or laws, or lits, or medics sec-
ond. Instead of the intense rivalry
and sometimes bitter feeling between
the different colleges, we should ac-
quire the bigger spirit of Michigan.
Let us be proud of our college, but
let us be prouder still of our Univer-
sity. Let us first of all be men of
Michigan.
AT THE FRESH MIXER
The first Fresh mixer of the semest-
er wil be held this afternoon. To the
many new freshmen \who have enter-
ed the University it will be their first
opportunity to get acquainted with
the members of their class, while it
will give all freshmen a new sense of
the meaning of class spirit.
Freshmen of this year have had
very little realization of class spirit-
one of the most characteristic phases
of college life. Pep meetings and
rushes of other years have necessarily
been absent, so the freshmen have not
had any occasion to get together often
as a class. The mixer will give them
the chance. It ought not to be dis-
regarded.
If it is true that only four ien of
Germany have the confidence of the
Allied powers at the present i T
they must be Wagner, Goethe, Mar,
and Mendelssohn.
With prohibition throughout the
state we ought to have a dry cam-
pus this spring, but will we?

Be Published by Snappy
Stories)

My heart is torn with anguish by
your tears.
Deeply they sear their way into my
bosom.
Hot madness courses wildly thru my
veins.
I tremble and my brain reels
As I feel the cosmic surge of your
despair
Calling to me.
The pearly gates of paradise--the par-
adise of love
I see before me thru your tears.
(As It Would Be Written by Dr.
Thomas Tovell)
Weep no more my gentle maiden,
thy complexion is awry,
I love not the lovely dew drops
hanging softly in thy eye,
If thy shoes are tighttand hurt thee,
fair'damsel, take them off,
Alas, the sky is shedding water and
my opera hat I doff.
Eureka! Weeping maiden, won't you
take this golden ducat
And get thee down to Sweitzers and
buy thyself a bucket.
After looking once at the above.
our watchword too is C. 0. D. Call
OFF the Dogs. But we are courage-
ous, dear reader. They don't hang
people in the state of Michigan any
more.
Today the Senior Engineer asked
us if Socrates died in a garret. He
said he heard it was an Attic story.
* Overwork, You Know
"Medics to Visit State Insane As-
lum March 8."-Daily head. Oh, yes,
"Eventually, Why Not Now?"
So Subtle
Art Professor-"Can anyone tell me
howtto make a Maltese cross?"
Kitty-"Pull his tail."
Songsters Three
The Washroom Trio bombarded a
certain dormitory last Thursday
evening with "Sweet Adeline," and
sundry other strains. What should
we quote? "In the spring a young
man's fancies lightly turn, etc.," or
"music hath charms to soothe the
savage." Incidentally we were also
savage.
Our Daly Novelette
It was a dark and stormy night and
Noah sat in the hold of the ark weav-
ing his new Easter frock out of let-
tuce leaves. Ham entered eggsas-
perated.
"Liquor," he shouted.
Noah knitted his brow as he pick-
ed up the slapstick and said, "My
wife. Not me. She just threw the
elephant overboard for eating the as-
paragus tips off the cues in the bil-
liard room. I refuse to lick any-
one."
"Liquor on board," Ham shouted.
"Why, Ararrat is now dry and the
sheriff walketh even in his sleep on
the road from Toledo,' 'answered
Noah, all nettled and in a prickly
heat.
"They're making it on board, I tell
ye, "Ham was getting wrothful. "The
kangaroo came on board with hops
and the bear is bruin up in the
cabin."
(Slow curtain)
Famous Closing Lines
"Ahem," said the dressmaker, "Life
is nut that which it seams."
LOUIS XVI.

CAMPUS TRAI)ITiONS 31T'I'BE
OBSERTE D, SrlII)MORE S SAY
Engineers Discuss Action of First
Year iilen on Campus; Suggest
Remedy
Stricter regard for campus tradi-
tions on the part of the freshmen was
urged by the sophomore engineers at
their meeting Thursday, and a mo-
tion to that effect was passed. First
year men, it came out in the discus-
sion, were lax about removing their
hats on entering any University build-
ing, and as to precedence due upper-
classmen in passing through doors of
the buildings. Hazing as a possible
remedy was considered.
Business transacted included a re-
port of the chairman of the social
committee favoring co-operation with
the other second year classes in hold-
ing, an All-Sph smoker in the near
future. The social committee was giv-
en instructions to take it up with the
other classes.
Cohn, class athletic manager, stated
that several representatives of the
different classes on the campus had
met in Dr. May's office for the pur-
pose of starting inter-class athletics.
Tryouts will be calle dfor shortly, and
the hope was expressed that the
classes not represented at the con-
ference would appoint representatives
as soon as possible.
A1MERliAN Shi2I NMAY BUY
Coblenz, March 8. .-Sale of iron
crosses to American soldiers as sou-
venirs has finally been prohibited, due
to action taken by the shopkeepers
after a fight of nearly two months on
the part of the citizens of Coblenz.

Try Our Specials Sunday Dinners

C.0

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Tuttle's Lunch Room

I.

Everything the Best

338 Maynard

Across from Arcade

:---------

---r--

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Hotel Allenel
ANN ARBOR'S LEADING HOTEL
Special
Chicken Dinner
Sunday
.$1.00
Special Attention iven to Dinner Parties

The World War and Its
Consequences
By WILLIAM HERBERT HOBBS
Charles W. Graham
Successor to Sheehan & Co.

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See the Late Arribals in Spring Millinery at
STEVENS & ofPERSHING, 618NEARKTAD,

Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES

I

ICE

SKATING

They' are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 987 109 S. Main St.

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AT THE COLISIUM

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Y

Y

TO-DAY
and

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Dependable, Scientific, Drugless

2to5

7 to 10

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This Year there are Smarter Separate.
Skirts Than Have Been Seen
One thing that makes them more attractive is their slender length of line; for
this season has brought them more long and more narrow.
Another is that they are beautifully-colored soft plaids-and very fine
French serges and gabardines; that not only look better, but ARE better than war-
time woolens.
And then the perfect Hutzel tailoring!
The Spring skirts here are certainly as fine a collection as one could assemble
-and for its size, the range and variety are remarkable!
Hundreds of New Blouses have come
for Spring Selling.
Dress waists, on Russian blouse lines, of rich colorings and striking embroid-
erings of wool and odd beads.
Dainty pastel Georgettes to wear with light spring suits; beaded, embroi-
dered, tucked, pleated and plain,
Tailored waists, of heavy crepes de chine and tub satins;

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EYE
EXAMINATIONS
Phone 59o for appointment
Emil H Arnold
Optometrist 220 S. J'ain St
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7to a.
m., and hourly to 9:10 p. M.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Fx
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6 :oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:o5 p. m., 10:50 p. W.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. n., r2:2o a. m.
r :xo a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. n., to
12:20 a. m.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. tp 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-B
314 S. State St. Ann Arbon
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
O. D. MORR ILL
Typewriters L _,
Typewriting;
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Nickels Arcade Pherie 1719
First Floor

#1

And lingerie blouses in attractive models.

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$2.98 to $15.00

Great stocks of new Pink Silk Underwear and Exquisitely Embroidered,
hand-made Philippine Lingerie.
New Silk Hosiery of standard makes and excellent quality $1.00 up.

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- HUTZEL S

Ann Arbor weather: warmer, rain,
colder--repeat.

Use the Daily to ea ch the students.
Four thousand students read it every
morning.-Adv.

MAIN AND LIBERTY STTEETS

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