100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 08, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
POSSIBLY SNOW;
COLDE~R

:43 at tx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE~
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 109.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MARCH 8, 1919.

PRICE THREE

MICHIGAN'S TRACK TEAM DEFEATS
CHICAGO BY SCORE OF 44 TO 33;
DASHIJUMPIAND HURDLES JOHNSON'S

Daniels And Allied Naval Lxperts
Discuss Plans For New Warships
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 7.-Secretary Daniels and a party of American
naval experts will leave for Europe next week to disucss with the Al-
lied naval officials the best type of capital warships to be built in the
future based on the lessons gained in the great war. Because of con-
flicting opinions on this subject among American officers the secre-
tary has been asked to submit a definite recommendation to the next
congress in December.
It was also learned today that Secretary Baker will sail for Eu-
rope about April 1 to close up the business operations of the American
Expeditionary Forces. He will be absent about five weeks and prob-
ably will arrive overseas before Secretary Daniels returns home.

RED CROSS MISSION; ENDANGERED
BY SPARTICAN SHOOTING, DRIVEN
_ INDOORS; FIGHTING MOST, SEE

WOLVERINE STARWORLD BEATER
IN DASH, WINNING OVER
SCHNEBERGER
MAROON HURDLE MEN
FAIL TO OBTAIN FIRST
Williams, Windy City Court Player,
Loses High Jump Meet; Second
Victory for Maize and Blue
(Special to The Michigan Daily)
Chicago, March 7 (via Associated
Press).-Michigan defeated the Uni-
versity of Chicago by a score of 44
to 33 in a dual indoor track meet here
tonight.'
Carl Johnson, one of the most ver-
satile track stars ih the college world,
won the highest number of individual
points, obtaining 15 points.
Maroon Lose Dash
In the 50-yard dash Johnson was
hard pressed by Schneberger, the best
sprinter on the Maroon team, but the
Wolverine man succeeded in winning
first place in this event.
Johnson alos won first place in the
high jump, competing against Wil-
liams, the Windy City basketball play-
er,dthe only seriousdcompetitor. Hall
and Buchanan, hurdlers for the Gar-
den City track squad, were unable to
forge out ahead of Johnson in the 50-
yard hurdles.
Second Victory for Johnson
This is the second time that John-
son has proved the individual star of
indoor track meets this year, having
won 20 points in the Michigan-Notre
Dame meet at Ann Arbor last Sat-
urday afternoon.
The winning of the first indoor track
meet by the Maize and Blue cinder
men is almost a prediction of a Michi-
gan conquest over the Maroons when
they meet in the open.
Wolverines May Repeat Conquests
Michigan won both the indoor and
outdoor track meets with Chicago last
year, and the Wolverines should be
able to repeat these victories during
the coming meets.
The success by Coach "Steve" Far-
rell's men tonight reminds track fans
of predictions made by Coach Far-
rell and Captain Sedgwick, who both
claimed that the Maize and Blue
would triumph in the struggle. Cap-
tain Sedgwick even went so far as to
state in an interview that the Maroons
would be whipped by at least 10
points.
A llFresh frlixer
To Use Formality
Acquaintance through formal intro-
duction will be absolutely necessary
at the first All-Fresh mixer to be
given at 2:30 o'clock Saturday aft-
ernoon in Barbour gymnasium.
Dean Myra B. Jordan has definitely
stated that the ordinary method pro-
cedure in becoming acquainted will be
used. This decision makes a decided
change from the previous mixers
where the mere matter of introduction
was done away with and informality
thus secured.
A committee on introduction has
been appointed with Alethea Yerkes
and David Beers as joint chairmen.
The chairmen have anticipated a large
attendance and have therefore pro-
vided for their need by appointing ad-
ditional committeemen.
Several unsold women's tickets and
a few for men still remain. Those
who have not yet purchased their
tickets will be given the opportunity
to do so at the door. It is announced
that the regular Union orchestra has
been secured.

WORK FOR SOLDIERS
Men returning from the service
have an excellent chance of ob-
taining work in Ann -Arbor if a
survey of a few of the city's fac-
tories serve as a basis for opin-
ion.
The Detroit Wire Fabric com-
pany will be able to take on sev-
eral within a week and can use
some now. The Ann Arbor Fur-
niture company is also taking in a
few discharged men. The Hoover
Steel Ball company is expecting
Ia boom in their business shortly
and will also be able to employ
many more within a short time.
MICHIGAN MAJOR TESTS
EAST COIST ATILLEIR
GERMAN "BERTHAS" OUTRANGED
BY LATEST AMERICAN
GUNS
Coast defense guns are now being
made that will fire 45,000 yards, ac-
cording to Professor Field of the en-
gineering department. A gun was be-
ing made by the United States gov-
ernment at the time of the armistice
that would out-shoot Germany's fam-
ous monster "Berthas.,"
Professor Field as ,a major in the
ordnance department had charge of
many interesting experiments at the
proving grounds on Sandy Hook. All
coast defense guns from five inch up
to 14 inch were first tested here be-
fore being sent abroad. Range ta-
bles were constantly being made from
results obtained from firing the guns
out to sea.

WHITNEY
JUNIOR

SCENE OF
GIRLS PLAY

CHICAGO GIRL TO
HEAD) JUNIOR HOP
Chairman Chooses Miss Elizabeth
Badie to March with Him
April 4
TWENTY-NINE FRATERNITIES
ARRANGE FOR HOUSE PARTIES
Miss Elizabeth Badie, of 5108 Kim-
bark avenue, Chicago, and Carl Velde,
chairman of the J-Hop committee, will
lead the grand march at the J-Hop,
the biggest social event of the Uni-
versity year.
Miss Badie is attending Miss Star-
rett's school, a girls' private school in
Chicago. She has visited here on sev-
eral occasions in the past.
Applications for the hop will be re-
ceived to March 15. This change has
been made since the first date was
set in order to get the fraternities
lined up for their house parties.
These' applications should be sent
to Carl Velde by mail or brought in
person. He says that no hestitancy
should be shown by those who are de-
sirous of attending the hop. Arrange-
ments can be made for booths some
time in the next two weeks.
Twenty-nine fraternities are to give
house parties and more are making
arrangements. Indications point to an
unsiua lly successful hop, especially
since none was given last year, which
means that the spirit of two years
will be in one.
Noiseless Tile
Floors Library,
Cork tile flooring, which was
brought from Spain under great dif-
ficulty, is being laid in the reading
rooms of the new library.
The tile is of flicked pressed cork,
and will not crumble. It is laid in
blocks 14 inches square, which are
glued to the floor. Pressure is ap-
plied by the use of sandbags for a
short time, after which, the tile is
sanded till smooth. This type of floor
is especially recommended for libra-
ries as it is practically noiseless.
Due to war conditions much trou-
ble was experienced in securing the
cork. I
The work is being done by the Ken-
nedy company of New York city.
MEDICAL GRADUATES HONORED
BY MICHIGAN UNION DANCE
For the first time in the history of
the medical school there will be a
dance given in honor of the senior
graduates by the other three classes at
the Michigan Union on Friday night,
March 14. The faculty of the medical
school and the internes of the hospi-
tal have also been invited as guests
for the occasion.
Dr. and Mrs. H. H. Cummings and
Dr. and Ms. L. L. Bottsford will be the
chaperons. It is hoped by Jacob
Manting, '20M, chairman of the com-
mittee, that the event will become a
tradition in the medical school.

CINDUSTRIAL NEED
Speaker Investigates Local Factories
During Three Day Visit
Here
ORGANIZATION FOR STUDY
IN LABOR FIELD BEGUN
"Solution of the big problems of
society and "industry today lies not
alone in legislation, but in the last
analysis in character," declared Mr.
Fred H. Rindge, leader of the indus-
trial service movement for the na-
tional Y. M. C. A., in his lecture last
night in Hill auditorium.
"One of the perplexing questions be-
fore us," he continued, "is leadership.
Nowhere has this crying need been
so pressed home to the American peo-
ple as in the army camps. Of the two
million men who occupied our big
cantonments at any one time, it is es-
timated that at least 200,000 of them
could neither speak nor write Eng-
lish.
"As a result of this war the world
has commenced to revalue things. Self
interest is being replaced by social in-
terest. It has been objected by a
prominent foreign leader in America
that we place his fellow countrymen
into a little group by themselves and
call this group a problem. We must
do more than this: we must get the
human touch which makes for under-
standing such a people.
"To avoid Bolshevism we must re-
move the.. causes. Industrial democ-
racy must be established. I believe
that it is possible for labor and cap-
ital to get together, and it becomes the
function of the college student to un-
derstand both of these elements, ar-
bitrating between the two."
As a result of Dr. Rindge's work
in Ann Arbor, definite steps have been
taken to organize an industrial service
committee in the University. At a
meeting of students and faculty inter-
ested last night, C. T. VanDusen, '19E,
president of the Engineering society,
J. P. Adams, '19 president of the Com-
merce club, and one "Y" representa-
tive, to be named by that organiza-
tion, were appointed as a nominating
body to select a permanent committee.
While here, Mr. Rindge visited the
majority of the factories in the city, in-
vestigating conditions, and rousing an
interest among the manufacturers in
social welfare work. He gave a dem-
onstration of his methods of teaching
English to foreigners without a knowl-
edge of their language and without the
aid of an interpreter at the plant of
the Hoover Steel Ball company.
NATION'S UNEMPLOYED GROWS;
MICHIGAN CONDITIONS STEADY
Washington, March 7. - Although
this week's report by the federal em-
ployment service shows a heavy in-
crease in unemployment, the increase
does not extend to Michigan.
Detroit reports a surplus of 25,000
unemployed; Grand Rapids, 1,500;
Port Huron, 550; Flint and Jackson
report an approximate equality of sup-
ply and depand.

LATE WIRE NEWS
Washington, March 7.-Vlad-
ivostock has been thrown into
a commotion by the arrest and
deportation of six non-Bolshe-
vik municipal officials by Gen-
eral Rinoff, commander of the
Vladivostock military district
under the Omsk and Siberian
governments.
Official advices today report-
ing the incident said there was
strong feeling among the people
of the city against the Allies
because the seizure of the offic-
ials wastpermitted. Represent-
atives of the Allies notified their
respective governments and
asked for instructions.
It was intimated in official
quarters here that the Allies
and the United States would
warn Kolchak, dictator of the
Omsk government, that General
Rinoff must be restrained from
interfering with the Vladivos-
tock local authorities.

It has been decided to give the
Juniors Girls' play at the Whitney the-
ater this year instead of in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall, as has formerly
been the custom. It will be given on
April 2.
Rehearsals have been very satisfac-
tory this week. Only the first act has
been practiced so far; the second act
will be taken up next week. All the
lyrics are in and the whole produc-
tion promises to furnish good enter-
tainment, as there will be plenty of
catchy music, dancing, and funmak-
ing.
PROVINCIAL WISCONSIN PLAY
WELL PRESENTED BY MASQUES
Collegiate Alumnae and Campus Wom-
en Enjoy Dramatics, and Dance
Following
A beautiful picture of Wisconsin vil-
lage life is what "Neighbors" proved
to be when presented Friday after-
noon in Sarah Caswell Angell hall be-
fore the Collegiate Alumnae and the
women of the campus. The presenta-
tion was given by members of Mas-
ques.
Ike Fisher furnished music for the
dance which followed immediately
after the play.
Pennsylvania Students Plan Banquet
The Pennsylvania club will hold its
annual banquet at 6:30 o'clock
Thursday evening, March 13, at the
Michigan Union. Tickets are now on
sale at the Union desk, and members
of the club are asked to secure them
as soon as possible.

1919 OPERA ORCHESTRA
TO START REHEARSALS
MIRRIELEES, SUCCESS OF "BLUE
BOOK BLUES," HAS TWO
SONG HITS
First rehearsal for the orchestra
that will play for "Come On Dad," the
Michigan Union opera, will, be held at
1:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon at
the Union. A 20 piece orchestra is
planned.
Organization - of the orchestra has
been delayed until a report on the
eligibility of tryouts could be obtain-
ed. It arrived yesterday and Earl V.
Moore, musical director, immediately
issued the call for rehearsal.
The men named below are asked to
come to the Union Saturday after-
noon at the specified time, bringing
their music stands with them. Mr.
Moore will start work immediately in
order to bring the orchestra up to the
standard being set by the cast and
chorus..
The music this year is of a high'
quality, reflecting the tendency of
modern light opera, as manifested by
"Maytime," "See You Later," and oth-
ers of the successes whose songs have
been so popular. This necessitates
having a good orchestra in order to
bring out the effectiveness of the
musical numbers, and it is for this
reason that Mr. More is anxious to
get rehearsals started.
Knight Mirrielees, '20E, who made
such a success of "Blue Book Blues"
last year, putting it into the reper-
toire of nearly every dance orchestra,
has two songs this year that are ex-
pected to be every bit as good. One
is "Come On Dad," the title song of
the opera, and the other, "Betting."
The following musicians are asked
to appear at the Union at 1:30 o'clock
Saturday: James E. Comin, '21,
Glenn H. Cummings, '21; C. C. Hamill,
'21; Clarence H. Harpst, '20E; Har-
old Herman, '21; M. D. Hicks, '22E;
Wm. Kruger, 22M; E. F. Merrill,
'20M; E. R. Vernon, '20E; Walter E.
Moore, '22E; Joseph Neuss, '21E;
Harold K. Schillinger, Herman S.
Sherman, '21E; Harold F. Stotzer,
'20; Walter F. Tschaeche, '20E; A. M.
Yeager, '21D; Hugo V. Prucha, '19.

AMERICAN WORKERS QUARTERED
IN HOTEL BEHIND X. G.
BATTERY
CASUALITIES HEAVY
AMONG SPECTATORS
Submission to Allied Demands Would
Ruin German Sea Trade, Says
Lloyd Director
(By Associated Press)
London, March 7.-Members of the
Red Cross mission were endangered
by the shooting when Spartican forc-
es cdptured the main telegraph of-
fices in Berlin Thursday, says an ex-
change telegraph dispatch from Ber-
lini.
Colonel Taylor ordered the women
with the mission to seek safety in the
Palace Hotel. The American mission
to look after the welfare of pris-
oners is quartered in the Hotel Ab-
lon behind a battery ofmachine guns.
The..fighting, the dispatches say, was
the worst Berlin has seen.
Relieve Police Headquarters
Berlin, Mach 6.-Government troops
began an attack today on all-sides of
the center of the city and made bril-
liant progress. The attack was for
the purpose of relieving police head-
quaters, surrounded by Sparticans.
A column from the west progressed
to within a block of police headquart-
ters in two hours.
It is believed that the column suc-
ceeded in relieving the besieged garri-
son although military headquarters
tonight had not yet received any in-
formation on that point.
200 Casualties
Between 200 and 300 persons were
killed and wounded. The casualties
were Nlargely among the spectators.
Spectators, despite all warning, stay-
ed to watch the fighting. The cas-
ualties among the government troops
was relatively light. There was very
little organized opposition by the re-
publican guides and Spartican ma-
rines. They were caught by surprise
without sufficient leadership and were
unable to'check the attack of the well
disciplined forces.
Leaders Not Worried
Weimar, March 6-Leaders of the
German government here announced
'today that the situation in Berlin
gave them no cause to worry. They
(Continued on Page Six)
Oratory Contest
judges Seleted
Judges for the Northern Oratori-
cal league preliminaries have been
selected from members of the Uni-
versity faculty and outsiders, it was
announced Friday. The judges are
Prof. G. D. Bradley of Toledo uni-
versity, Prof. Arthur Andrews of the
Grand Rapids junior college; Prof.
T. C. Trueblood, Mr. Louis Ech, Mr.
R. K. Immel, all of the oratory de-
partment; Mr. J. E. Thornton of the
English department; and Mr. George
Wilner.
The contest for juniors will be held
at 7 o'clock Saturday evening in room
302 Mason hall. Contestants are ask-
ed to be present at 6:45 o'clock in or-
der to draw lots for position on the
program.
No admission fee is charged for the
preliminary contests and everyone in-
terested in oratory is welcome to at-
tend.

2:30 P. M.

A L -FRESH -V

DER

TICKETS

25 cents

TO- DAY

AT

BARBOUR

GYM

At the Door

-

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan