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March 07, 1919 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY,

C. 0. D. Iystery
Puzzles Campus
C. 0. D.?
No mystery at all. One only has to
take a choice of the meanings that
were expounded yesterday. An ever-
wise and ever-ready (just like the
razor) freshman solved the enigma
readily and glibly explained "Sure,
that guy's a 'Cub on the Daily.' " The
Boy whose marks were pretty well
along in the alphabet can't help but
think it means "Call On Dean," but
then one must admit he is prenju-
died.
The junior says it means "Caught
Off Duty" or "Called On Dorothy," but
the junior was wrong and his mind
was not on his curriculum.
The S. A. T. C. boy reflects and ex-
pounds this "Clean Olive' Drabs."
The Armory and Union habitue
guesses and says, "Come On Dance."
The maiden thinks it's a subtle way
the men on campus hve of saying to
her "Cute, Oh Dear."
WAR DECLARATIONS
DEMAND 50 TREATIES
Division of Wrd hnc Smaller States
Will Make iUt o' Dlocments
Lengthy
Paris, March 6.-- Duc to the fact
that more than 50 declarations of war
have been made upon Germany since
hositlities started in 1014, it is prob-
able that more than 50 treaties of
peace will be signed by the confer-
ence now being held at Versailis. It
cannot be stated in round figures how
many treaties must be signed, for the
splitting of Ausria-Hungary and Ger-
many into many segments may nec-
essitate the drafting o treaties quite
unthought of when President Wilson
presented his 14 points before con-
gress.
At that time Austria-Hungar hadd
declared war five times; , Germany,
Brazil, once; Bulgaria. once; China,
twice; Cuba, once; France, four times;
Germans so closely that the reed on
five times; Great Britain, fohr times;
Greece, four times; Italy, four times;
Japan, once; Liberia, once; Montn-
egro, twice; Panama. twice; Portugal,
twice; Rumania, once; Russia, twie;,
San Marino, once; Serbia, three times;
Siam, twice; Turkey, twice; a'nd the
United States, twice. Since then, how-
ever, time and events have changed
things considerably. havaria. Wurt-
temburg, Saxony, Hungary, and per-
haps several more entities may de-
mand and recieve treaties.
The Czecho-Slovaks, Jugo-Slas,
and Armenia, Palestine, and the dis-
integrated parts of Russia are en-
titled to separate treaties. Thus, when
the tremendous work of the Versailles
conference is accomplished, more than
75 distinct international peace agree-
ments may result. When all the
treaties are completed, they must be
approved by the treaty-making powers
of their respective governments.
GOVERNOR CALLS
WAR BOARD MEET
Gov. Albert E. Sleeper has issued
a call for a meeting of all county war
boards to be held on March 11 and
12, in Lansing, for the purpose of set-
tling some of the problems that now
confront the state war board com-
mission.
The governor has selected a com-
mittee of 20 to begin preliminary dis-

cussions of these problems at once
in ordor to have a definite basis on
which to work when all the county
representatives get together next week.
A committee of five has been ap-
pointed to represent the interests of
Washtenaw county. It is thought that
at least th-ee of these men will be
able to attend this meeting. The mem-
bers of the committee are as follows:
George W. Millen, chairman; Henry
Douglas, Hugh Vandewalker, Wm. B.
Hatch, and Roscoe O. Bonistee.
BARONESS THRILLS AUDIENCE
WITH STORIES OF GREAT WAR
(Continued from page one)
gray Uhlans. Actual photographs of
the recently vacated battle fields were
shown. The destruction wrought by
the Hun could be easily seen. The
dead horses and ruined houses show-
cd'only too clearly what ruin the
Germans had brought to France.
"In the first days of the war, talk
of forgiveness and forgetting was
heard, but we who have lived through
it can never forget.," said Baroness
Huard.

A1,'IIS GOING ON

POSTAL DEPARTMENT CHANGES geographic board today changed the
CALIFORNI"S ABBREVIATION offcial abjreviation for California
form "Cal" to "Calif.," because of con-
Washington, March 6.-At the re- fusion with the abbreviation of Color-
quest of the postoffice department, the ado.

A

--- I

TODAY
3.:11-Tryouts for the Classical club
play in room 103 U-hall.
7:3--Members of the student Volun-
teer band meet in Lane hall.
in7 .0--Chinese students hold a meet-
ing in the brown room of Lane
i hail.
7:3--Poyonia Literary circle meets
in Lane hall.
7:30-G. R. club will be reorganized
and officers elected at 718 Monroe
street.
7:30--Christian Endeavor society so-
cial at Church of Christ.
':--i-Wesleyan Guild social at Lane
hall.
8: 0--Frederick I. Rindge of Colum-
bi i university speaks in Hill audi-
torium.
9:00-Round op dance at Packard
aFademy.
TOMORROW
7:30-"Qzuo Vadls," an eight reel fea-
ture, has been obtained for the
weekly picture show at the Meth-
odist church.
U-NOTICES'
Tickets for the Pennsylvania club
banquet go on sale tonight at the
Union desk.
The date for the Cercle Francais play
tryouts has been changed to Mon-
day night.
PLAN PERMANENT ORGANIA-
TION OF SCHOOL NAVAL UNIT
Will Compile History of Detachment
iN Attempt to.Make It
Permanent
At an-informal meeting of the Mich-
igan naval militia held last night in
the Michigan Union billiard room, with
Lieut. J. R. Hayden presiding, a com-
mittee was appointed to consider the
permanent organization of the militia
from a social standpoint.
Plans were discussed for a ban-
quet to be held in the Union at 6
o'clock Wednesday, March 19. An-
other committee was appointed to
complete plans for the banquet. A
suggestion was also made that a his-
tdry of the militia's activities be com-
piled for the benefit of its members and
those interested in it.
It is expected that the members who
attend the banquet will have many
experiences to exchange, and efforts
will be made to secure a projector for
showing the photographs they took
while in the service.
JUNIOR ENGINEERS HEAR
RINDGE, THURSDAY NIGHT
Decide to Organize Class Basketball
Quintet; Gault Addresses
Meeting
President H. Rindge, who will speak
Friday evening in Hill auditorium on
"The Human Side of Engineering,"
addressed the junior engineer meeting
Thursday morning. He gave abrief
outline of the lecture he will deliver
and talked on some points other than
those he will bring up in his lecture.
Ralph E. Gault, '19, president of the
Student council, talked to the class
on the aims of the council.
It was voted to have a class basket-
ball team. Steps will be taken im-
mediately to form one and arrange
for some competition.
BOLSHEVIKI STARVING;
USING CATS FOR FOOD
(Continued from page one)
come a question of common human-
ity.

20 Die Daily in Petrograd
Thousands are dying daily in the
great centers of population like Pe-
trograd, Moscow, Kiev, and Odessa.
In Petrograd alone the deaths from
famine three weeks ago numbered 200
daily. Typhoid, or "hunger typhus,"
is carrying off young and old every-
where, and in Moscow glanders is
endermic.
There is no fuel for lighting and
millions live in pitch darkness after
nlghtfall. Coal and wood can be ob-
tined only by the very richest or by
favorites and parasites of the Eolshe-
vik government.
Milk $10 a Quart
;n Petrograd three weeks ago milk
was selling for $5 a pint, pork $30 a
pound, butter $45, tea $125, and pota-
toes $3.75 a pound.
Students read The Daily.-Adv.
Daily want ads 'rng results.

^.. :
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