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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 07, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIL\

FORMER PROFESSOR BERRY
IN, RECONSTRUCTION WORK
TO HAVE CHARGE OF FORT RILEY
EDUCATIONAL
SERVICE
Under the supervision of the chief
of service, Major Charles S. Berry,
associate professor of the educationalj
department of the University, and now
on leave, the educational service of
the United States army base hospital
at Fort Riley is stedaily enlarging its
scope of academic work.' The base
is one of the 40 ilitary hospitals in
this country designated for recon-
straction work.
Special Instruction Given
At present, army, grade or high
school, college, and commercial cours-
es are available in the academic de-
partment. Preparations are now un-
der way for instruction in telegraphy,
carpentry, auto-mechanics, printing,
and agriculture. A gymnasium in

-. _________________ -' ~ e -

which such apparatus will be install
as is needed for curative work a3
physical development of patients,
now under construction.
The reconstruction work as defin
by Major Berry has a twofold pu
pose: first, it is to assist in the ca
of the wounded or otherwise disabl
soldier, and secondly, it is to be
means of fitting him to better ho
down his old job after discharge,
any new job which he might wish
take up. The work, which is n
compulsory, in on way obligates a p
tient to remain in the service.
Major Berry in Charge of Work
Major Berry, who has been plac
in complete charge of the education
service at Fort Riley, entered the set
ice Nov. 26, 1917, and was placed
duty in the psychology division of t
surgeon general's office at Washi
ton. Later he went to Camp Dix,
J., and then to the Walter Reed h
pital at Washington, where he w
connected with the educational wo
When Fort Riley was made one of 1
big centers for reconstruction, Ma
Berry took up his work there.

ed
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pa-
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RHODES AMITIONS
REQUIRED NO LONGER
iEE"TION OF SChOLARSHIPS
RESUM3ED THIS
YE AR
Qualifying examintions will no long-
er be required according to the plans
for the resumption of Rhodes scholar-
ships which were announced by Prof.
Frank Aydelotte of the Massachu-
setts Institute of Technology, Ameri-

"C Sudae
Full of Spice
709 N, UNIVERSITY

nal can secretary to the Rhodes trus-
rv- tees.
on For the two years, 1918 and 1919,
the two scholars will be chosen from
-Michigan and 15 from other states.
N The others receiving only one for the
.OS- two years.
vas Elections Resunmed This Year
rk. According to the statement of the
the trustees in London, "The election of
jor Rhodes scholarships throughout the
United States will be resumed this
year. The postponed scholarships due
o to the various states for 1918 and 1919
will be filled next fall.
"It has been decided that the qual-
ifying examinations previously requir-
ed shall no longer be held and schol-
ars will be elected on the basis of
their collegiate or university record
supplemented, if necessary, by any
further tests that the committee of se-
lection may impose. There will be se-
lections in all states."
Prof. Willard T. Barbour, of the law
school, who himself was a Rhodes
scholar, stated that although the
Rhodes trustees remove qualifying ex-
aminations they can do nothing rela-
tive to the entrance requirements of
Oxford for undergraduates. Special
dispensatiopn is made, however, for
American students which allows them
to make up their Greek, a part of the
regular entrance requirements, there,
and take an examination on it at the
end of their first year.
Broadens Field-Barbour
Professor Barbour feels that this
new rule will broaden the field from
which candidates are picked. The
previous method for choosing the men
was to have all applying take a quali-
fying examination which was to be
given at the University. Those pass-
ing this came up for examination be-
fore' a board composed of the Presi-
dent of the University, the Dean of
the literary college, Chief Justice of
the state supreme court, and a repre-
sentative from one of the snaller state
schools for final choice.
George R. Parkin, general secretary
of the Rhodes scholarship fund, while

ISSUE OF VICTORY
STAMPS ANNOUNCED
Washington, March 7.-A new issue
of three cent stamps to commemor-
ate the successful termination of the
war will be known as Victory stamps,
and will be available throughout the
country within a few weeks.
The new stamp bears the figure of
Liberty Victorious, helmeted, and
with a sword in one hand and scales
in the other. The whole design ap-
pears upon a shaded panel, with Amer-
ican, British, French,rBelgian,band
Italian flags ydraped for the back-
ground.
The post office department in an-
nouncing the issue stated that the
supply would not be sufficiently large
to replace the regular three cent
stamp and postmasters will sell Vic-+
tory stamps ony by request, as it will
probably take several weeks to sup-
ply requisitions from all post oi1ces.
L. F. VOORHEES, '18A, VISITS
CITY AFTER YEAR OVERSEAS
Louis F. Voorhees, '16A, is visiting
in Ann Arbor after a year's service
in France. Voorhees enlisted in the
fall of 1917 and was attached to the
40th regiment of engineers. After a
period of training at Washington, D.
C., he was sent overseas in January,
1918, and was put to work immediate-
ly, errecting camouflage for artillery
units.
Voorhees landed in New York last
January and received his discharge.
He graduated from the architectural
college in 1916, and received his
master's degree immediately preced-
ing his enlistment in the army.
Johnson Speaks to Rotary Club
"Newspapers and the Great War"
was the topic on which Mr. Harley
H. Johnson spoke at the Rotary club
dinner at the Union Wednesday noon.
Michigan's paper for Michigan men.
-Adv.

MEDICS TO VISIT STATE
INSANE ASYLUM MARCH

Senior medics will pay their annual
visit to the Pontiac asylum Saturday,
March 8. The class will mike -the
tour of inspection under the direction
of Dr. Albert M. "Barrett. professor
of psychiatry and diseases of the
nervous system, who will explain the
different cases noted.
The class will leave on the Michi-
gan Central at 7 o'clock and will prob-
ably return the same evgning.
Ensign Reem, '18, Here for Short Time
Ensign Guy A. Reem, '18, was in Ann
Arbor for a short time Wednesday on
his way to Washington. When in
school Ensign Reem was a member of
the baseball team.
ATTENTION !
Frats and
Sororities
Stewards
FOR MEATS OF QUALITY

NEW STUDENTS RECALLED
All persons enrolled with the
appointment committee in Tap-
pan halF are requested to call
at that office this week and fill
out location blanks, in order
that they may be reached every
hour of the day.

SRPHEU
DIRECTION/OF SURGEON GENERAL
j 8y LIEUT.EI0WARD ILGRIFFJM

8

t
'I
w.N r

CALL

J. P. ESCHELBACH

Mon. 10
MEN
ONLY

Tue.11-Wed.
Mat. Wome
Evening Me

PHONE 821

202 E. HURON

n

A

NOW SHOWING

The hest Shoes you can put on your feet don't necessarily cost
more than the other kind.
Gettirg good Shoes is a matter of selection and of buying.
Our way of making and holding trade is to give 'our patrons the
benefit of our years of experience in fitting Shoes. We show the styles
best4, aa t the fi~t,

MeAs Shoes - $5.00 to $10.00
Women's Shoes $5.00 to $10.00

visiting the University, said that he
did not feel that the best men were
being brought to Oxford. He stated
that they could pfck the future lead-
ers of England from the students of
Oxford and that it was this class of
men that they wished to get from
the United States.
Ponse lie Secured
For Pay Festival
Rose Ponselle, soprano, who recently
made her debut at the Metropolitan
Opera house startling the musical
world in much the same manner that
Galli-Curci did a few years ago, has
been engaged as the star soloist of
hte May festival Friday evening. May
16, in Hill auditorium.
Mr. Charles A. Sink, secretary of the
University School of Music, has been
trying for soni time to secure an en-
gagement with Miss Ponselle. During
the Caruso concert Monday evening he
received a wire from her New York
managers that arrangements had been
completed for her appearance here.
HONORABLY DISCHARGED MEN
TO GET HELP FROM CHURCH
Soldiers of Methodism Episcopal Faith
to Be Given Financial Aid in
Worthy Cases
Provisions. have been made by the

See the

As interpreted
by the Screened

D7ance of

Story of the

the

Scriptural Siren
who danced
maddeningly

Gross & Dietzel
117 E. Washington St.

"SEVEN

for a

Plan 's Head

p~mom

- p
-U

THEDA BARA

Leave Copy
I at.,,
Quarrys and
The Delta

LASSIFIE
&OVERTfSING

Leave Copy
at
Quarry's and
The Delta <

5000 Performers

- An Arkiul of Animals

1

-,;I.

LOST
LOST - Red leather memorandum
book, with Union membership card,
University receipt, and withgrawval
card from B. R. T. Return to J. E.
Way, at desk at Unin .
LAST-Tuesday evening, a belt to a
gentleman's light overcoat. Return
to Daily of .
LOST-Jeweled Phi Delta Theta fra-
ternity pin. Deward if returned.
1427 Washtenaw. Phone 319.-
Y)PT-Irpoin the east entrance of
Tewistry building, a sheep-ski
@gt. Finder call 717-J. Reward.
LOST-Leather pocket note-book. Re-
turn to 320 Thompson. Phone

LOST
LOST-Pair of glasses Friday near
gymnasium. Call 2649M.
WANTED-Tenors and baritones for
church choir. Call on Mrs. Grace
,onold at University School of Mu-
sic at 3 o'clock Monday or Tuesday.
WANTED -- Typewriter. Call Barnes,
1058-N4.
FOR SALE

board of home missions and church
extension of the Methodist Episcopal
church to aid financially, worthy stu-
dent members who have been honora-
bly discharged from the United States'
service.
The board has imposed qualifications
of scholarship, character, and age. and
requires that all applicants be recom-
mended by the facuity of the Univer-
sity, and by the officials of the church.
Prof. E. H. Kraus, Dr. A. W. Stalker,
and Mr. R. C. Jacobson compose the
committee in charge of the awarding
of aid here.
Help is limited to the extent of $400
for the entire college course. interest
being at the rate of 4 per cent.
Use the Daily to reach the students.
Four thousand students read it every
morning.-Adv.

AUGMENTED ORCHESTRA

All Performances

NOTE---During this engagement only two performances
Daily 3:00 P.M. and 8:00 P.M.

FOR SALE-York Perfect-tone Cor-
net, odel 95. Gold plated, sand
blast finish. 373-M, 410 Church St.
KISCELLAN E OUS
STUDENTS-If you want to make
$400 or more this summer, call
Laidlaw at 1170-R after 7 p. m.

PRICES

Matinee--Lower Floor 35c- alcony 25c
Night--Lower Floor j5c--alcony 35 c--Second Valcony 25c
These Prices Include War Tax.

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