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October 13, 1918 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-13

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r~f

ju3aitg

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WII
SERTICE

ER

IX. No.11.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1918.

PRICE THREE

11

HES AND THEATERS TO BE OPEN
YINSPITE OF INFLENZ DANGER
TE POSTPONES DRASTIC MEASURE

ER OF CASES IN S. A. T. C.
NOW ESTIMATED AT
225
MISTRY ASSISTANT,
J. S. RICHTIG DIES
its Showing Symptoms of Dis-
ase Warned Not to Attend
Class
cial to The Michigan Daily)
sing, Oct. 12.-The state board
i~rnrhnh'"T -rnected tO take

Ath
m
eeti
pos

,whmch was eXpecu oBn
easures tonight closing pub-
ng-places throughout the
stponed action.
r death from bronchial pneu-
lowing influenza occured last
Ann Arbor when Mr. Joseph
g, teaching assistant in gen-
aistry, succumbed to the ef-
he malady. Mr. Richtig had
for some time Oath influen-
finally developed into quick
a. His wife and mother have
inn Arbor for the past week.
a funeral will be held at S

frichiganensia n Is
To 21e WarA nnual
There will be a Michiganensian this
year which promises to be better than
ever, and besides being particularly
adapted to the needs of the times, it
is expected that it will be lower
priced. The plan for the new "War
Annual" is as follows: the book will
be issued in three independent parts,
one at the end of every term, contain-
ing a complete record of the people
and happenings of the University dur-
ing that period. Subscriptions will be
taken for the three issues or for sin-
gle ones. Those who subscribe for
all three will receive a binding coupon
and at the end of the year may have
their book bound in regular Michi-
ganenstan form.
Charles R. Osius Jr., '20, has been
appointed managing editor and John
Duncan Cameron, '19, will be business
manager. Cameron was a member
of the business staff of the IMichi-
ganensian last year and Osius is act-
ing city editor of The Daily.
A complete pictorial record-is be-
ing secured of the military units and
the men in them. No man will leave
here to go to training camp without

Germany Answers President
Wilson 's Peace Term Queries
(Special to TheMichigan Daily)
(By the Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, D. C., OCT. 12.THE GERMAN GOVERNMENT
IN REPLY TO PRESIDENT WILSON'S NOTE ACCEPTS TERMS LAID
DOWN BY PRESIDENT IN HIS ADDRESS OF JANUARY 8, AND
SUBSEQUENT ADDRESSES. ACCORDING TO THE UNOFFICIAL
TEXT OF REPLY THE GERMAN GOVERNMENT AGREES TO COM-
PLY WITH PROPOSITIONS OF THE PRESIDENT IN REGARD TO
EVACUATION OF OCCUPIED TERRITORIES. RESPONSIBILITY OF
THIS STEP TOWARD.PEACE, NOTE SAYS, HAS BEEN FORMED
IN CONFERENCE AND IN AGREEMENT WITH THE MAJORITY
OF THE REICHSTAG.

Central
Michigan

Lake,
near

located in

NOTE PUZZLES OFFICAL WSHINETON
PRESIDENT WILSON HEARS OF MESSA6I E YRIISESN OM

everal other cases are reported to first having a picture taken for thei
ve developed pneumonia. The num- annual. Thus the shifting conditions
r of men in the S. A. T. C. with the and personnel of the war-time Vniver-
lease is put at 225. The old Union sity will be caught and held for fu-
ilding which is now being used as ture remembrance.
convalescent ward is full of men Prof. E. R. Sunderland, chairman
the road to recovery who have of the Board in Control of Student
en transferred from the hospitals Publications, has announced that the
cause of overcrowded conditions. term issues will be sold and the
Regarding the seriousness of the binding done absolutely at cost. Work
idemic, Dr. J. A. Wessinger, health will begin upon the book at once.
leer, says that in his opinion it has Those wishing to try out for either
ached its height and is now on the staff should see the editor or business
cline, at least in Ann Arbor. He manager at the Press building.
rtes that fewer cases have been
ning in from the ranks of both PAYMASTER HERE.
my and civilians, and believes that TO VISIT S. A. T. C.
e epidemic will have run its course
thin the next 10 days.
Theaters Have Big Crowds Lieut. J. J. Wilson, paymaster of
[he theaters of the city have as yet the Great Lakes naval training sta-
ceived no official notice regarding ton, is in Ann Arbor today. Lieuten-
e closing of their doors to the pub- tn, is n rb today. Lieute
According to reports, a large at- ant Wilson is here to look over the
idance has been maintained in situation in regard to feeding and and
ite of the S. A. T. C. ban and other clothing the men in the S. N. T. C. His
stacles tending to hinder the bus- presence in the city does not mean
ss. Definite agtion on tie matter' that the men will be paid here. 'i'heir
wever, has been delayed, pendinglG
e meeting and the decisions of the pay will come from Great Lakes as
te board of health in Lansing. originally-planned.
The rumor on the campus that class- Although the date for closing en-
in the University will be sus- listments has been postponed to Oct.
nded, has been officially denied by 15, men who become 18 before that
e University authorities. Such ac-te n eistsunlessntea
n will not be taken unless deemed Sept. 12 registrants. As enlistments
solutely necessary by the board of will not be open into the navy out-
alth in Ann Arbor, and since theI side of college, men will probably not
idemic here is regarded by the be able to enlist in that branchat all
lth officials as presenting a less until after the next registration.
-ibus situation than in other cities, Eight students who were formerly
ch interference is not expected qt on inactive duty have reported to Ad-
esent. However, the authorities are miral Berry for active duty and will
kingallstuent whoher seerereceive active duty pay..
Ids or who otherwise display the The naval quota has been filled from
ghtest symptoms of influenza, to the Medical and Dental colleges. It
thdraw from classes until a physi- is not known as yet, however, wheth-
n approves their returning. er these men will be able to remain
Mechanics Recotering in the S. N. T. C. The authorities are
Officers in charge of the mechanics' waiting for word from Washington.
ining unit here announced yester-
y that of the 175 men quarantined Airmen Let Out for Sunday Motoring
Waterman gymnasium, all but 35 As a result of violation of gasless
re discharged in the morning, and Sundays, two aviators have been dis-
it those remaining have had neither charged from Chanute aviation field.
rer nor colds for the past 36 hours. Philip S. Wood of Detroit, and Wil-
The condition in the students' army liam L. Beamer, also of Detroit, were
,ining corps is also said to be im- riding in Decatur one Sunday, and
oving. More than 100 men were had their car decorated with yellow
;charged from the hospital yester- paint. Archie B. Weston, '18E, all-
y morning, and several more left American quarterback, also was anv
ring the afternoon. Restrictions occupant of the machine. No action
(Continued on Page Six) has been taken in regard to ,his case.

"OVER THERE" TO BE
ON CARUSO'S PROGRAM
NOTED TENOR TO VARY FROM
USUAL SELECTION OF
CLASSICS
Caruso has prepared a brilliant
program for his Ann Arbor concert
Saturday, Oct. 19, which is bound to
dazzle those fortunate enough to hear
him. Variety of numbers and a wide
range of selections will provide some-
thing to "tickle the palate" of critics,
music lovers, and laymen alike. The
numbers schedtrled for the great ten-
or himself have been chosen from
those in which he is especially fam-
ous, while the numbers selected for
the assisting artists, Miss Morgana
and Mr. Breeskin, have been chosen
not only for their own beauty and
interest, but as a fitting background(
for the work of Caruso himself. 1
Elias Breeskin, violinist, will be the
first to appear, by offering a spar-
kling Wieniawski air, after which
Nina Morgana will sing a beautiful
Bellini aria. All this will be by way
of preparation for the appearance of
the great tenor.himself, who will sing
the beautiful "Celeste Aida" aria, one
of his most beautiful selections. En-
cores galore will follow, for a great
part of his program will be given in
this way. Patriotic selections such as
"Over There" and his own composi-
tion, "Liberty Forever," will be heard
a-plenty. Mr. Breeskin and Miss Mor-
gana will each appear again while
Caruso is "catching his breath" behind
the scenes, after which he will offer
a sparkling Donizetti air, and another
group of encores.
After the intermission, Breeskin
and Morgana will offer "Gypsy Airs"
and "Shadow Dance,' 'respectively,
preparatory to Caruso's appearance in
the famous Pagliacci aria. As a final
number he will be joined by Miss
Morgana and together they will close
the program by singing the "Star
Spangled Banner" in duet form.
(Continued on Page Six)

MAJ BULURD LEADS
SECOND YANKEE ARMY

ALLIED ADVANCES'
LILLE, DOUAI AND
CIENNES

THREATEN
VALEN-

(By the Associated Press)
BULLETIN
With the Anglo-American Forces on
the Valenciennes Front, 11 a. m.-The
British again attacks this morning
and takes Brebieres, and passed
through to the eastward. They are
now within slightly more than a mile
of Douai itself. A stiff rear guard re-
sistance by enemy forces was over-
come.
With the American Army North-
west of Verdun, Oct. 12.-The second
American army came into being to-
day and began operations. It is under
command of Major General Robert L.
Bullard. The first army, which has
been in existence formally since Au-
gust, is now under command of Major
General Hunter L. Liggett. General
Pershing assumes command of the
groups of armies.
(By theAssociated Press)
The Anglo-American forces, which
formed a great wedge in the enemy
lines southeast of Valenciennes, are
haulting momentarily before an ex-
tensive effort to seize the German de-
-fense lines from Valenciennes to the
Oise. Both to the north and south
of this area, the Germans are re-
treating or continuing to fall back
under the pressure Marshal Foch is
applying.
Douai Doomed to Capture
Douai, the most important of the
cities within the immediate reach of
the Allied forces, with the exception
of the fallen Cambrai and threatened
Lille, seems about to pass into Brit-
ish hands.
Lille itself, the greatest of the
French manufactu'ing towns, is in
none too secure a position. The
wedge below Douai is threatening the
(Continued on Page Six)

When The Home
Folks HearOf It
If the "flu" doesn't get you, the
remedies must! This is not the title
of the latest lilting melody advertised
in the windows of up-to-date musicI
establishments; it is merely the philo-
sophical conclusion of a helpless stu-
dent, affected, or afflicted, as the case
may be, by the profuse mail depos-
its of an energetic Ann Arbor post-j
man.
It happened this way. The familyt
tree, including all its branches, hav-
ing suddenly acquired the informa-
tion that the flu microbe had invaded
Ann Arbor's intellectual precincts,
took upon itself the duty of a pre-
ventive agency. Result: 23 letters in
solemn array yesterday greeted the
hungry, happy and incidentilly,
healthy individual who scurried home
to lunch.
The first was from mother, with a
supplement from dad. More were
from grandmother, cousins, aunts, un-
cles, and all the rest of the branches
and twigs, with contents running re-
spectively thus:
"Gargle 12 times a day, and if you1
can't get listerine, for heaven's sake,
use just plain salt."
"Am sending six bottles of peroxide}
and three mixtures of boric acid. If
these don't work, try vinegar and'
soda. It won't matter if you swallow
some, either."
"Please buy immediately some cod-
liver oil and take two tablespoons
before and after meals."
"We're sending you a bushel of
quinces and green pears, along with
half a crate of lemons. See that you
get plenty of fruit acids."
"I haye wired the druggist to pro-
vide you at once with a btle of iron
tonic. Be sure to take it thfough a1
straw."
"Here is $10 in case you get hun-
gry between meals. You must keep
your system built up to resist this dis-
system built up to resist this dis-
ease."
"Be careful and don't eat any more
than is actually necessary, and if you
catch cold, don't eat anything at all."
"Don't stay up after 6:30 at night
to study; and keep away from stren-
uous exercise.
"Walk at least eight miles a day.
"In case you develop a sneeze, break
it up with asperin.
"Don't touch any asperin tablets.
Use quinine capsules.
"Drink hot water in the morning,
cold at noon, and luke-warm water at
night.
"Keep your throat covered up; wear
your rubbers if it rains, carry them
with you if it's cloudy. Eat plenty of
cough drops."
Oh, Death, where is thy sting?
Where, Flu, thy victory?
LIEUT. HARRY B. CURTISS TO
COMMAND JAMESTON S. A. T. C.
Harry B. Curtiss, second lieuten-
ant in the infantry, is to take com-
mand of the S. A. T. C. at Jameston
college, Jameston, N. D. Lieutenant
Curtiss was to have been head re-
ceiving officer for the fourth detach-
ment of mechanics to arrive here
about the 15th of the month.
During his stay in Ann Arbor,
Lieutenant Curtiss was range officer.
He was to provide a rifle range, a drill
ground, and a school of the bayonet.
Lieutenant Curtiss came here in
July from Camp Custer. His going

is deeply regretted by both offiecrs
and men.

FRENCH WIRELESS PICKS
ANSWER AND SENDS IT
TO U. S.
SWISS LEGATION FAILS
TO HEAR OF HUN REP)
People Wonder Why MaximilIlan
Foreign Secretary Solf Rep.
resent Germany
(By the Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 12.- Germa
reply to President Wilson's inqi
intercepted as it was being sent
the great wireless towers at Na
and forwarded here tonight in an
ficial dispatch from France decl
Germany is ready to accept Pi
ident Wilson's peace terms, evac
the invaded teritory as a prerequi
to an armistice, and that the bid
peace represents the German pec
as well as the government.
Although on its face the text
the German note seems to be a c
plete acceptance of President -
son's terms, the people of the Uni
States and the Allied countries shc
be cautioned against Raceptin it
such atcompliance of the Preside
demands will mean immediate ces
tion of hostilities.
Wilson to Interpret Note
As President Wilson was in I
York, and received comment on
note, his views cannot be stated i
and none of his official family
in Washington cared to speak for I
Without any attempt to disco
what appeared to be at a casual r
ing an accepting of the terms of
President has laid down, officials i
were very casual as not accepting
German note as a document wi
means the end of the war. It need
be examined and fully considered
fore the views of the American s
ernment can be stated. The text
the note follows:
Text of German Reply
'In reply to the questions of t
,President of the United Stat
of America the German goveri
ment hereby declares:
"The German government ha
accepted the terms laid down I
President Wilson in his addrei
of Jan. 8, and in his subseque
addresses on the foundation of
permanent peace of justice. Co
sequently, its object in enteri
discussion would be only. to agri
on practical details of the applic
tion of these terms. The Germs
government believes that the go
ernment of the powers associat4
with the government of the Uni
ed States also takes the positi
taken by President Wilson in b
address. The German gover
ment, in accordance with t
Austro-Hungarian"governmei
for the purpose of bringing abo
an armistice, declares itself rea
to comply with the propositions
the President with regard to eva
uation. The German governme
suggests that the President m
occasion the meeting of a fix
commission for making the nece
sary arrangements concerning t
evacuation. The present Germ
government, which has underta
en the responsibility for ,this st
toward peace, has been form
by conferences and in agreeme
with the great majority of t
reichstag. The chancellor is su
ported in all his actions by tV
will of this majority, speaks
the name of the German gover
ment and of the German peop
"'Berlin, Oct. 12, 1918.
(Signed) "SOLF, State Secreta
of Foerign Office."
(Continued on Page Six)

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION
CORDIALLY INVITES PRESBYTERIAN AND ALL STUDENTS NOT
OTHERWISE AFFILIATED TO THE FOLLOWING SERVICES:
10:30 A. M.-THEME: "JUSTICE VERSUS PEACE"
Noon Bible Class taught by Prof. T. E. Rankin
6:30 Young People's Evening Service.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
(Cor. State and Washington Sts.) ARTHUR W. STALKER. Minister
ROY C. JACOBSON. Director Student Work
BISHOP HENDERSON-AT 10:30
12:00-Bishon Henderson sneaks to University men and women.
4:00-Friendly Hour with refreshments.
4.45-Ye ung People's Meeting.
7 : 3!1-Popular Evening Service. Sermon by Dr. Stalker, "Too Busy."
STUDENTS WELCOME

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