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February 27, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-27

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THE WEATHER
PIOBABLY SNOW
TODAY

Ar A6
.4iltr t aj& t
4 vi

VOL. XXIX. No. 102.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1919.

GiIC DINNHER IS
BEGINNiNG OF BIG
FUTURE FOR TOWN
SIX HUNDRED CITIZENS PLEDGE
THEMSELVES TO CAM-
PAIGN
UNIVERSITY TO WORK
WITH CITY OFFICIALS

Dr. A. A. Stockdale, of Toledo,
Principle Speaker; Tells War
Experiences

is

"We will -never bring disgrace to
this, our city, by an act of dishonesty
or cowardice. We will fight for the
ideals and the sacred things of the
city, both alone and with many. Thus
we will transmit this city, not only
not less, but greater, better and more
beautiful than it was transmitted to
us."
This was the solemn oath taken by
six hundred loyal citizens of Ann Ar-
bor last night as a fitting climax to
one of the most enthusiastic demon-
strations ever held in the interests of
the city's. welfare.
Public Spirit Growing
The new Chamber of Commerce din-
ner last evening at the Michigan Un-
ion proved substantially the growing
spirit of unselfish public interests
that has been developing among the
business men of the city and the fac-
ulty of the University during the past
few years. It was the opinon of those
most active in the formation of the
new chamber of Commerce that this
first meeting at the Union was the
biggest and finest event that "has oc-
curred within the past 20 years in be-
half of a more vital, more progressive,
larger and finer Ann Arbor.
The speakers of the evening kept
the crowd in a continual uproar of
applause. The terms "Teamwork,"
"Civic Development," "Industrial
Growth," and the "Get Togther Spir-
it," seemed always to touch a respon-
sive cord in the minds of those pre-
sent.
"Those are the things Ann Arbor
must have, and these are the things
she is going to have if she is to be a
true American city in the years to
come," was the statement of C. F.
Holland, secretary of the Chamber of
Commerce of Jackson, in closing his
address.
* Professor Weniey Speaks
Prof. R. M. Wenley spoke on the
subject "Rivers of Doubt." However,
as he stated, there was no room left
for doubt in regards to the new
awakening that had taken place re-
cently in reference to the affairs of
the city. In speaking of the relation
between the University faculty and
the citizens in the future he said: "All
must know each other and we must
all get together."
The principle speaker of the eve-
ning was Dr. Allen A. Stockdale, of
Toledo. For two years he has been
actively engaged in war work among
American soldiers. During the past
six months he has spent the greater
part of his time on the western front
in Europe. Previous to entering war
work he took a prominent place among
the civic government promoters of
Toledo. Thus he brought a message
of particular interest to the members
of the new Chamber of Commerce.
Relates Experiences
He told of some of his experiences
with the soldiers "over there." Of the
noble way in which they fought and
died without a murmur, all for the
(Continued on page six)
SUPPLEMENT BEGINS
The Daily supplement to the
Student Directory begins on
page five of this issue.

WANT DATA FROM
WORK APPLICANTS
Several of the applications for work
now on file with the University Y. M.
C. A. employment secretary do not
contain the second semester sched-
uules. Some of the jobs require vac-
ant periods and it would take much
time and trduble to call up each appli-
cant to ascertain whether he could
work or not at that time. All who
have not handed in a schedule are re-
quested to do as soon as possible.
Hereafter, those who have their
schedules on file at the office in Lane
hall, will receive first consideration
in the giving of employment. ,
There are also a few students whose
addresses and phone numbers are
lacking. They are asked to assist the
secretary by leaving the desired in-
formation.
Students wishing to work any time
this semester are asked to file their
applications with the employment sec-
retary at Lane hall as soon as possible
so that some idea may be obtained as
to how many and what kind of jobs
it will be necessary to provide for
students this spring.
TAX EXEMPTIONS WILL
AFFECT 750 FACLYMEN
EMPLOYES OF STATE, COUNTY
AND CITIES ARE ALSO
EXEMPTED
Net income tax exemptions will af-
fect approximately 750 University in-
structors and administrative officers,
and about 135 Ann Arbor school teach-
ers, as a result of an explanation yes-
terday by the internal revenue bureau
at Washington in clarification of its
recent annoncement regdrding non-
taxable incomes.
State Employes Exempted
The collector of internal revenues
for the first district of Michigan in a
letter to Secretary Shirley W. Smith,
stated that the final draft of the new
revenue bill exempts the salaries of
state and municipal employes from the
income tax. This leaves the relation-
ship of the federal income tax law to
salaries paid by the University exact-
ly the same as formerly, namely, such
salaries are not to be included in com-
puting net income and need not be
reported to the income tax collector.
Public Teachers Included
The bureau explained that this ap-
plies to teachers providing they re-
ceive pay from a public source, and
not froma private school. It also ap-
plies to all officers and employes of
state, county, city, or other local gov-
ernments. Other people who are not
included in the exemptions, are taxed,
if unmarried, on their net incomes
which equal or exceed $1,000, and if
married, on $2,000 and above.
The exemption of certain salaries
was made in the tax law which took
effect a year ago, but doubt over the
precise meaning prompted the inter-
pretation from the revenue bureau.
NINA MORGANA, SOLOIST WITH
CARUSO, SHOWED TALENT EARLY
Nina Morgana, who will sing a few
numbers with Caruso in the last con-
cert of the Pre-festival series at 8
o'clock Monday evening in Hill audi-
torium comes from Buffalo, N. Y.
As a child she was always in great
demand at concerts. When Buffalo
gave a great concert in Convention
hall in, aid of the San Francisco fire
sufferers, she was the star soloist.

People began urging her parents who
were Sicilians to send her to Italy to
study. After much stinting to raise
funds she was sent to Milan. She
studied under the famous teacher, Te-
resa Arkel. Her progress was so rapid
that after a year's study she made
her debut at Alexandria, Italy. The
manager of La Scala hearing her, im-
tiediately engaged her for his opera.
Later she toured Italy and many Eu-I
ropeax cities.

M. PETIT OF FRENCH FACULTY
TO SING SEVERAL SELEC-
TIONS
TICKET SALE PROMISES
LARGE CROWD PRESENT
1919 Midnght Sons' Quartette and
Former Keith Star Hold
Big Places
Making their first appearance of the
season at the Spotlight vaudeville to
be given at 8:30 o'clock Friday night
in Hill auditorium, the 1919 Midnight
Sons' quartette promises to be one of
the "high spots" of the bill.
The present personnel of this group
comprises Joe Palma, '20M, A. B.
Thompson, '21M, William M. Kemp,
'22M, and Grant A. Smith.
Two other vocal numbers will be in-
cluded on the program. M. Jean Pe-
tit, a former officer in the French army
and now a member of the French
faculty, will sing several selections
in his native tongue.
M. Petit's Reertoire
M Petit's repertoire will embrace "La
Marseillaise," Massenet's "Pensee d'
Amour," and "The Star Spangled Ban-
ner" (in French). This being the first
appearance of a member of the facul-
ty in a Spotlight vaudeville, M. Petit's
act gives promise of proving one of
the most novel attractions of the even-
ing.
Former Keith Man to Sing
The third vocal number on the bill
will be supplid by Garrett Pat Con-
way, "Singer of Irish Ballads," as he
is heralded on the program. Conway
was on the Keith circuit previous to
his entering the University, and is
considered to possess an unusually
fine and well-trained voice.
Large Audience Expected
These three acts, together with the
threeinstrumental numbers and four
novelties, constitute a program which'
it is hoped, will be effective in bring-
ing a capacity audience to Hill audi-
torium.
ALL-LAW SMOKER
IS GREAT SUCCESS
What part the lawyer will play in
a changed legal world was the sub-
stance of Dean Henry M. Bates'
speech at the All-law smoker Wednes-
day night at the IVIichigan Union.
"The young lawyer has vast opportu-
nities in the legal world," said Dean
Bates, "and he should use these to
conserve American institutions dur-
ing the period of reconstruction."
More than 100 budding lawyers were
at the smoker and a large number of
the faculty. Cider, doughnuts, and
cakes were served. Cigars and cigar-
ettes were passed out by the hun-
dred. Many of the men have just
returned from war, and tales of the
experiences which they have gone
through were exchanged.
Rolly Winslow, who was an honor-
ary captain in the Italian army and
in the service of the Y. M. C. A., told
of conditions in the Italian army. Les-
ley Field gave a short talk. Before
the speeches Ike Diamond, '22, and
Garrett Conway, '22, entertained with
singing and playing.
The smoker is the first of a series
which is to be given by the law stu-
dents in order that they may become
better acquainted.
Victim of Wreck a Michigan Man
Archie Oakes, one of the victims of
the interurban wreck Tuesday near
Flint, was a graduate of the Univer-
sity, in the engineering class of 1909.
He was a member of Phi Delta Theta
fraternity. While in school his home
was at Grand Haven, he later moving
to Adrian.

SPOTLIGHT PLANS ARE COMPLETED
BIG PROGRAM TO INCLUDE SCORE
OF NOVEL AND ATTRACTIVE FEATURES

_ ,

Ticket salesman are now posted on
and around the campus, and the ad-
mittance slips may be procured either
from them or from any of the State
street stores displaying the Spotlight
poster. Early reports from the ticket
sales committee indicate that the
vaudeville will have a large audience
representing both faculty and student
body. All proceeds are to go to the
benefit of the American University
Union in Paris.
COMMUNITY HOUSE
PLNNEDFOR CITY
Council, Federation of Charities, and
Clubs Give Support to
Movement
WILL CO-OPERATE IN CIVIC
WORK AND CARE OF VISITORS
Ann Arbor is to have a Community
House.
Sponsored by the City council, which
has appropriated $600 for its upkeep,
the City federation of charities, which
has given $1,000 for the same purpose,
and by several granges and clubs, this
new departure will open its 16 rooms
to the public early in March at the
corner of Main and Wiilliams street.
To Be Civic Center
Community House is to be a civic
center, working in co-operation with
the Y. W. C. A., the city clubs and
rural granges, where out-of-town vis-
itors and transients may get over-
night lodgings, where lectures and en-
tertainments will be given, and where
members of granges will find welcome
and reading rooms.
Classes for women in economics,
cooikng, dressmaking and millinery
are to be organized. These will be
open to all who wish to enroll. Mrs.
T. J. Klech, who has been active in
Ann Arbor in club work, will be the
house director, and will devote her
whole time to that position.
Planned Two Years Ago
The house is the outgrowth of a
movement that has been actively go-
ing on for the past year. The need
for such a place was first felt two
years ago by Mrs. Maria Peel, county
probation officer, when she was car-
ing for the children brought before
the juvenile courts. It is thought that
permanent residents of the Y. W. C. A.
may be given rooms in this new
home.
CLASSICAL CLUB INITIATES
TO BE ENTERTAINED TONIGHT
"The Martyrdom of Woman," Comedy
To Be Put on Is Work of
Members
Plenty of good comedy is promised
when the Classical club produces "The
Martyrdom of Woian" at its initia-
tion party Thursday evening, in Alum-
ni Memorial hall.
In spite of its serious title, "The
Martyrdom of Woman" treats in a
farcial manner the questions of wom-
an's suffrage and militarism. The
play is the work of members of the
Classical club.
H. G. Hoch, ex-'19, Returns
H. G. Hoch, ex-'19, returned Wed-
nesday to the University to resume
his studies which he dropped in
March, 1918, to enter the service. Hoch
was in France with the 2nd Field Ar-
tillery for a short time, and has just
recently returned to this country.
Hoch was discharged from the army
last week. He is a member of the

Zeta Psi fraternity.

Two officers of the student council
resigned at the meeting Wednesday
night so that the men elected to fill
those positions last fall might take
charge. President Charles T. Van Du-
sen, '19E, tendered his resignation and
Ralph E. Gault, '19, will take the
chair. Gault was elected for the pres-
idency last spring but entered the
service. He was a second lieutenant
of field artillery at Camp Zachary
Taylor.
James I. McClintock, '19, is now sec-
retary of the organization, Walter M.
Nugent, '19E, having resigned. Nu-
gent kept the books while McClintock
was in the service.
The advisability of bolding a come-
back mass meeting was one of the
principal subjects of discussion at the
meeting. Some of the council mem-
bers thought that such an affair would
be very appropriate considering that
so many have re-entered the Univer-
sity this semester.

._

Spotlight
Vaudeville
Fri., Feb. 28

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