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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 01, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1 1

FFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
blished every morning except Monday
ig the university year by the Board in
rol of Student Publications.-
ABER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ie Associated Press is exclusively entitled
he use for republication of all news dis-
ses credited to it or not otherwise credited
his payer and also the local news pub-
d herein.
itered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor,
igan, as second class matter.
bscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
fices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
ones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
mnmmunications not to exceed 300 words,
gned, the signature not neqessarily to ap-
in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
es of events will be published in TIhe
y at the discretion of the Editor, if left
s mailed to the of tce.
signed communications will receive no
ideration. No manuscript will be re-
ed unless the writer incloses postage.
he Daily does not necessarily endorse the
iments expressed in the communications.
-ence L., Roeser...........Editor-in-Chief
ired C. Mighell........Managing Editor
:ld Makinson...........Business Manager
guerite Clark ..............Night Editr
les R. Osius, Jr............City Edtor
id B. Landis....... ..Sport Editor
tha Guernsey... .....Women's Editor
k K. Ehibert............ Associate Editor
n I. Davis..............Literary Editor
.rand A. Gaines..Advertising Manager
es L. Abele........Publication Manager
aid M. Major.......Circulation Manager
. M. LeFevre...........Office Manager

"MORE TROUBLE"
Humorous and Clever College
Story with
FRANK KEENAN
Good Medicine for lxams
METHODIST CHURCH
SATURDAY, 7:30 Pa M,

Students Welcome

I

MEN TO LEE CUSTER
FOR HOME)IN MONTH

Ullomeu I
The last meeting of the attendance
committee for women this semester
will be held from 11 to 12:15 o'clock,
Monday, Feb. 3.
The board of directors of the Wom-
en's league will not hold its regular
meeting this morning on account of
exaflinations.
NORTHERN RUSS GOVERNMENT
WARNS PEOPLE AGAINST ALARM
Archangel, Jan. 31.-The northern
Russian government in a proclamation
to the population, warns the people
against an unnecessary alarm over
recent events resulting in evacuation
of Sherensky by American and Allied
forces.
The proclamation says it was nec-
essary to evacuate because of the
small foroes available for its defense
and also because of the exposed Al-
lied line on this front.
It declares that the northern Russ-
ian government is co-operating with
the Allies to the extent of its ability.
Speedig Must Stop, Says City Chief
"Speeding in the city must stop,"
says Chief of Police O'Brien, and to
emphasize the statement he took a
taxi driver who was caught for speed-
ing, over to the justice of the peace.
The latter agreed with the chief and
fined the individual $15 and costs.
The police motorcycle is once more
in commission and will be seen on
the streets regularly in the future,
says the chief.
The Cafeteria serves Chop Suey and
rice Wednesday and Thursday nights
for 25c, the kind that King Joy Lou's
great mandarine restaurant in Chi-
cago makes.-Adv.

GOVERNMENT RETAINS AIR AND
SUBMARINE BASE ON COAST
Cape May, N. J., Jan. 31.- Three
hundred and forty-nine acres at this
resort, the ground on which are erect-
ed the naval air station' and the sub-
marine patrol base buildings and bar-
racks, have been taken over by the
government.
Com. J. B. Patton, in charge of land
for the fourth naval district, has noti-
fled the municipality to remove all its
property from the reservation.
The price the government is to pay
will be fixed by an appraisal board, if
no agreement is reached between the
navy department and the owners.
About $4,000,000 is said to be the sum
the owners ask.
UNMUZZLED BULL DOGS TO BE
GIVEN AWAY BY LOCAL POLICE
Persons wishing a good dog may
apply at the police headquarters any
day now. Five bull dogs were tak-
en off the street Tuesday because
they were not wearing the regulation
muzzle, and as the owners did not
call for them by Thursday they were
given away. The chief of the depart-
ment says that "valuable" dogs are
not to be shot but are to be given
away to persons who will care for
them properly.,

Engineers
BUY THEM NOW-- THAT SET OF
Draw ing Instruments
$15.00, $18.00, $25.00, $28.00 THE SET
Some Bargains in Seond-Hand Sets

A/ R'S7

. ...m~

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

knommmoolow

-I

Don't fail to visit our new lunch room.

ABOUT 10,000 REGULARS
BE RETAILED AT
CAMP

WILL

Everything to Eat
Hot and Cold Drinks
We make our own baked goods.

w

ISSUE
Bernstein
Porter

EDITORS
Paul G. Weber
Philip Ringer
E. D. Flintermann

REPORTERS
aret Christie Herman Lustfield
Elilis Renaud Sherwood
Apel Henry O'Brien
Crozier Mary D. Lane

BUSINESS
ark B. Covell
Lw.rd Priehs, Jr.
'a R. Welsh
orge A. Cadwell
el F. Schoerger

STAFF
Robert I~. McKean
Clare W. Weir
Win. A. Leitzinger
Donnell R. Shoffne~r
Henry Whiting 11

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1919.
Issue Editor-Paul G. Weber'
GIVE THE "Y" A CHANCE
With the war over and the greater
part of its work finished, the Y. M. C.
A. has come under considerable fire.
Reports come back from "over there"
of not only general inefficiency, but of
graft and profiteering. Wide news-
paper publicity has been given the
charges, and almost anyone's version
can gain front page display.
It has been claimed by an army
chaplain that the nearer the front one
came, the fewer "Y" huts and work-
ers were noticed. Undoubtedly true,
yet it would seem rather natural. Up
in the front line trenches the grim
business of war came first. The "Y"
work must, of necessity, have been ex-
tremely limited there. Entertainment ,
such as were provided behind the lines
in rest billets, hospitals, bases, and
the like, could not be held under act-
ual fire.
Beyond doubt there may have been
some graft in the organization. What
similar enterprise ,or other enterprise
carried on such a large scale, does not
find in its forces unscrupulous schem-
ers prepared to lower shame on the
cause for which they work, if
it bring profit to themselves? And
the "Y" was no exception.
It must be remembered, however,
that much commendation for the "Y"
work in France is also heard. Gen-.
eral Pershing was not at all modest
in his praise.
America must not be too quick to
judge. This, like every other ques-
tion, has two sides, and the matter
ought to be weighed carefully. Time
will tell, and then only by careful in-
vestigation. Hasty accusations may
be the source of deep regret later.
Give the "Y" a chance to vindicate
itself of the grave charges brought
against it.
J. P. Morgan has been taken in by
the British money barons' club, ac-
cording to the newspapers. This is
the first time we have ever known the
financier to be "taken in" by anyone.

Battle Creek, Mich., Jan. 31.-De-
mobilization of the 14th division at
Camp Custer is proceeding very rap-
idly and there is some likelihood that
the drafted men of the organization
will all be out of the service inside
of another month or six weeks at the
outside. The daily rate of discharge
of enlisted men now runs from 1,000
to 2,000 and has even gone above the
latter figure and probably 'will be
even larger the next few days. Men
are being let out of the service, in
fact, as rapidly as the papers can be
handled and they can be paid off by
the quartermaster's department.
10,000 to Remain
When demobilization at Camp Cus-
ter is completed there will remain
at the cantonment something under
10,0001men, it is understood, and these
will nearly all be men of the regular
army or those who have asked per-
mission to remain in the service until
such time as they can make certain
of securing work in civil life. A
great many of the officers as well as
enlisted men are leaving the service
daily.}
Anxious to Leave
Thy camp officers have been some-
what surprised because of the small
number of men who have shown a
desire to'remain in the service until
certain of \work. It was announced
several days ago that, under orders
promulgated by the war department.
men without jobs awaiting them in
civil life might remain in service, as-
suring themselves of an income at
least temporarily as well as good
clothing and food and allotment of
pay for dependents. It is said, how-
ever, that many men practically with-
out prospect of work at home for some
time to come show a desire to quit the
service at the earliest possible mom-
ent, their discharge but adding to the
problem of the unemployed.
Care for Returned
Reconstruction work at the camp
hospital is in full swing and a large
number returned from overseas sick
or wounded are being cared for, and
being given scientific treatment and
exercise designed to remake them into
as nearly perfect specimens of man-
hood as possible. At the same ,time
they are being given educationalI and
vocational training that will serve to
fit them better for taking up the
duties of every day life and work.
Many who were among the first ar-
rivals here from overseas have so far
recovered that they will shortly be
discharged.
MOTOR CONVOY TRUCKS USE
CITY AS OVERNIGHT STOP

338 Maynard

Hotel Allenel
ANN ARBOR'S LEADING OTEL.
Special
Chicken Dinner
Sunday
$1.00n
Special Attention Given to Dinner Parties

SHEEHAN & CO I

TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM

-

Across from Arcade

t

i

FIX UP THE OLD ROOM
EYE SHADES MAKE WORK EASIER
PENNANTS AND WALL BANNERS MAKE YOUR ROOM INVITINC

b. E

A fine Line of Spring Millinery
is nolv being displayed at the Parlors of
STEVENS & PERSHING, 618 Packard

Here's hoping you have a fine New Year.-Sheehan

I

1a-i

I

PIANOS, VICTROLAS AND RECORDS, MARTIN
GUITARS, MANDOLINS AND UKULELES
AND ALL MUSICAL SUPPLIES AT

Students of theI

University of Michigan are cordially invited to
inspect our new liv . of

Winter Suits
and
Ov ercoats

Schaeberle & Son's Music House
110 S. MAIN STREET PHONE 254-Fl

Newest materials, newest models, newest
lowest prices

colorings,

any2

I

POSITION OPEN FOR MAN
Must have successful sales exper-
ience and ability to manage. We want
a student who has made good selling
something-such as books or other
speciality. Give reference and exper-
ience. Address F. S. C., Care of Mich-
igan Daily.-Adv.

6 &o4

~
~

I1

. I

Adler-Rochester Clothes

Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES
They are both delicious \and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbot and ackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard 'time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars--7:ro a
m., and hourly 'to 9:xo p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. in., and every hour to 9:48 p. nm. (Ex-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6':oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:o5 p. m., x0:So p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 11 :45 P. in., 12:20 a. UM.
:1o a, in., and to Saline, change a, Ypsilanti
Local Cars West Bound-7-:48 a. na.. to
12:20 a. m.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-B

The German army
time is under 500,000.
been considerable less
continued..

at the present
It would have
if the war had

We wonder if the Russian delegates
will get a shave and a haircut before
they attend the peace conference?
Ford inquiry before senate.-Head-
line. For most Ford inquiries we go
to the garage.
HIGHWAY COMMITTEE MEETS;
DISCUSSES STREET QUESTION
Nothing definite was decided at the
meeting of the highway committee
and board of works Wednesday night.
The city engineer is anxious to finish
certain streets which are located in
the business section of the city and
the committees were unable to de-
cide which would be started first. An-
other meeting is to be held next week.
It was decided to start work on a short
section to Jackson immediately.

Forty Packard motor trucks manned
by 80 drivers and mechanics, stopped
here Thursday night. This is the sec-
on convoy of army trucks to pass
th ough the city this week.
The convoy makes up companies C
and F of the 19th Nnotor truck divi-
sion and is enroute to Chicago from
Detroit. The outfit is under command
of Captain Gillowin.
Red, white and blue signs have been
posted through the city marking the
I' nied States motor truck convoy
route leading from Detroit, where a
great number of army trucks were
made, westward. Ann Arbor will be
used for overnight rests by the con-
voy- This no doubt will give the city
a little of the military air it had when
the"S. A. T C. was being trained here.
Sale of War Sa'iings Stamps Increases
Washington, Jan. 31.-The sale of
war savings stamps for this month
shows an increase over the record of
last month. The treasury reported to-
day a total, since stamps were placed
on the market 13 months ago, of $1,-
049,000,000, including $77,000,000 esti-(
mated sales for January.

You will save from $5- to $10- on
a Suit or Overcoat if you
buy at Lutz's
Great Clearance
of Men's
Suits and Overcoats
Every garment reduced and guaran-,
teed to give satisfadtion

i

i
i
i

314 S. State St.

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savis Bank
Incorpdrated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $650,000.00
Resources. .....$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
0.D. MORRIL L
T y p e w rite rsTy e r t n
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Niokels Arcade Phone 1718
First Floor

An' Arbor

Lutz Clothing Store

217 S. Main St.

IS

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