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February 01, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-02-01

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VOL. XXIX. No. 91.

ANN ,ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1919.

PRICE THREE t

DIRECTOR' AUTKOR
OF UNI'ON 0PER
TOARRIVE OMONAY

MUSIC COM3fOSERS TO
WITH WRITER OF
PRODUCTION

CONSULTI
1919

CAST TRYOUTS CALLED
FOR MONDAY EVENING
Principals to Work During Examiin-
aion Period; Committees
to Be Named
E. Mortimer Schuter, director of
the 1919 Union opera, will arrive in
Ann Arbor Monday morning to re-
main here until the initial perform-
ance of the show. He will be met
here the same day by Donal H.
Haines, '09, the author of the book
and lyrics, who is coming from Kal-
amazoo. to confer with persons in-
terested in the opera.
General cast tryouts will be held
at 7:30 o'clock Monday evening in
the old Union building, where Mr.
* Haines, Mr. Schuter, and Earl V.
Moore, '12, who is supervising the
writing of the music, will meet the
-prospective principals of the show.
Any persons intending to try out for
-the cast but who cannot be present
Monday evening are asked to com-
municate with F. C. Bell, phone 343,
so that other hours may be ar-
ranged.
Should Prepare Skits
Although not absolutely essential,
each tryout is asked to have some
skit prepared so that the , judges
may get a better idea of his ability.
Music writers for the opera will
hold consultations with Mr. Haines
at 10 o'clock Monday morning and
at 3 o'clock in the afternoon in the
new Union. Artists aspiring to draw
the 1919 opera poster will meet
there at 11 o'clock this morning.
Cast to Work Duripg Exams
It is the purpose of the commit-
tee to have Mr. Schuter work with
the cast tryouts during the exatnin-
ation period so that by the opening
of the second semester the cast will
have had considerable training.
Dancing Instructor to Come
The dancing instructor whom Mr.
Schuter is trying to secure is to ar-
rive the latter part of February. The
fact that the teacher desired is still
playing in "Jack o'Lantern," how-
ever, makes it uncertain whether he
will be released in time to accept
the position offered him here.
The appointment committee will
meet Monday afternoon to select such
members of the opera committees as
are needed for immediate work. The
naming of the full personnel will be
put off until after the opening of
the second semester.
WILSON AND ALLIED POWERS
DISCUSS BALKAN PROBLEMS

S. A. T. C. CLOSES
MIDDLE OF MONTH
Major Ralph H. Durkee is in Chi-
cago for the purpose of settling up
some of the affairs of the S. A. T. C.
prior to the closing up of the post
in Ann Arbor. He 'will return the
first of the week.
It was stated at headquarters yes-
terday that the post will be closed
by the middle of February. In ad-
dition to Major Durkee, the only
other officers still in Ann Arbor are
Lieuts. Leo R. Walterhand E. D.
Stotter, who will be here until all
the affairs are settled.
MICHIGAN GRDUTES
RECEIPPOINTMENTS
SIX MEN AND SEVEN WOMEN
'PLACED BY UNIVERSITY
COMMITTEE
Several alumni who have recently
received their discharges from serv-
ice, are applying to the appointment
committee of the bducational depart-
ment for positions in high schools.
In the last few weeks six men who
have returned from service have been
placed by this committee for next
semester.
Men Appointed
These men are Lloyd T. Smith, '16,
who will go to Ionia to teach mathe-
matics; Jacob Olthoff, '18; to Adrian
for sciences; Philip N. Iloff, '17, to
Battle Creek for physics; R. W. Ward,
'18, to Hillsdale as principal of the
high school; Arthur J. Wolf, '14, to
Saginaw for physics, and- Nelson V.
Russell, '18, to Wyandotte for his-
tory.
Seven Women Placed
Besides the above, seven women
have received the following appolnt-
ments: Mary E. Creech, '08. to De-
troit for Latin; Edith Lidke, '19, to
Ipsilanti for Latin; Margaret Kress,
'09, to Port Huron; Katherin Davis,
'19, to Plymouth for history; Ethel
Crandell, '19, to Coldwater for French
and Latin; Genevieve Stowe, '09, to
Mt. Clemens for English, and Anna
Van Buskirk to Connelsville, Pa., for
history. All these appointments will
take effect next semester.
FRESHMAN SMOKER
TO BE HELD FEB. ll
Plans for a class smoker for
Wednesday evening, Feb. 11, in, the
new Union bilding, were decided up-
on at a meeting of the freshman en-
gineering class yesterday afternoon
in the Natural Science building aud-
itorium.
Harbeck, chairman of the class so-
cial committee, reported that if per-
mission could be secured from Prof.
L. A. Strauss, arrangements would

Goodwin, Actor, Dies;frany Trials
Bring No Matrimonial Happiness

(By Associated Press).
New York, Jan. 31.-Nathaniel Carl
Goodwin, the actor, died in his apart-
ments in the Hotel Claridge here early
today.
Mr. Goodwin was born in Boston 61
years ago, and had been married five
times. His fifth wife, Miss Margaret
Moreland, who obtained a divorce
from the actor last September, a few
days ago announced her engagement'
to be married for the third time.
Position Secure
His first wife, to whom he was mar-
ried in 1877, was Miss Eliza Weathers-
by. In the 11 years of their married l
life, which terminated with the death
of Mrs. Goodwin in 1888, the actor
made secure his position as a comed-
ian.
A few months after the. death of
Eliza Weathersby, Goodwin married
Mrs. Nella Baker Pease, divorced wifeI
of a Buffalo physician. Less than
,three years after she sued him for di-
vorce on the ground of abandonment.3
His third marriage was in 1898 to Miss
Maxine Elliott. 'She was then a fam-
ous beauty and a talented actress as
well.

When he obtained a divorce form Miss
Elliott at Reno in 1908 there was much
speculation as to whom he would mar-
ry. The same year Miss Goodrich be-
came Mrs. Nat Goodwin IV. Their
married life was of short duration, for
there was a divorce in 1910.
Gave Art His Soul
Always Mr. Goodwin was a con-
scientious actor. He worked hard in
the theater because he loved the the-
ater, and he gave it the best that was
in him because he knew it deserved
no less. His excursions into Shake-
speare were not financial successes,
but he was content with the praise of
a few who knew-the few who realized
the reverence and the love he brought
to the precious texts and the care
with which he transferred them to
the stage. -
He wrote his own epitaph in his
book when, speaking of his obituary,
he said:
"I hope those who write it will deal
kindly with the poor player whose
only mission on earth was earnestly
to endeavor to live to make the world
laugh at sorrow and smile away the
tear."

WARRECORD COMMITTEE
PLANS LARGE CAMPAIGN

OVER

50,000 LETTERS
SENT THOSE IN
SERVICE

TO

BE.

A complete circularization of all
the alumni and alumnae, the faculty
and student body will be made as
soon as possible, according to plans
adopted by the committee in charge
of establishing a war record for
Michigan men and women, at a meet-
ing held yesterday in Detroit. This
will mean sending letters to over 50,-
000 people, in order to get a thor-
ough record of all former students
and members of the faculty who have
in any capacity served during the
war.
. Plan for Campaign
It will take over a month, accord-
ing to Mr. H. L. Sensemann, of the
alumni catalogue office, to obtain the
mailing supplies for such Tn exten-
sive campaign. The record will in all
probability be issued in book form
with a history of all of the Uni-
versity's activities in the war, the S.
A T. C., the number of men trained
here, and other subjects.
Faculty to Edit
Profs. F. N. Scott and A. L. Cross
with Mr. Sensemann will write the
editorials and edit the whole book.
As the project is of such a * large
scope it can not be estimated how
long it will take to complete it.
Much will depend upon the speed
with which the students, alumni, and
faculty answer the circulars.
JAPAN ACCEPTS THEORY OF
COLONIAL INTERNALIZATION
(By Associated Press)
London, Jan. .31.-The Paris corre-
spondent of the Daily Mail, in a dis-
patch to his paper today, says that
Japan on Thursday, formally accept-
ed the theory of internalization of
colonies and that. it is understood
that South Africa had abandoned its
opposition to the scheme.
"President Wilson," he adds, "un-
doubtedly won an immense diplomatic
victory, but has had to modify his
original proposals to some extent."

LEADERS OPPOSE
HON COLONY PLAN
SENATORS HAVE STRONG OBJEC-
TION TO WILSON'S IDEAS
OF DISPOSAL
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 31.-Vigorous op-
position was voiced in the senate to-
day by republican leaders, to the
plan for dealing with captured Ger-
man colonies and occupied terri-
tories in Asiatic Turkey, which had
been presented to the peace confer-
ence by President Wilson yesterday.
Report Unbelievable
Democratic leaders said that they
could not believe the President had
proposed internationalism of the ter-
ritories, and urged the support of the
American peace delegates. Some
senators pointed out that the official
communique had announced a plan
for this which had been provision-
ally agreed upon.
Debate Two Hours,
The debate continued for two
hours, and during its course republi-
cans reviewed their plan for a
league of nations, and the delay in
concluding peace with Germany, se-
cret diplomacy, and other workcon-
nected with the peace conference.
U. S. EXPORTS.
DOUBLE IMPORTS
Foreign commerce during the past
year is estimated at over nine bil-
lions of dollars with exports slight-
ly more than double imports, accord-
ing to recent government statistics.
The total business .was more than 300
per cent greater than foreign trade in
the years immediately preceding the
war.
Gradual readjustment of prices and
money conditions is relieving labor
troubles throughout the United States
and enables American manufacturers
to look forward to a future of for-
eign trade which a reconstruction
under American influence is expected
to pilot to greater value and impor-
tance as the conditions 'of peace are
resumed.

PEOPLE TO HONOR
MICHIGAN VICTIMS
Students and citizens of Ann Ar-
bor will gather Sunday in the church-
es for special memorial services in
remembrance and honor of those who
gave their lives in the great war.
Simplicity will be the keynote of
these tributes. Music, sermons, and
perhaps a few flowers will be the
only deviations from the usual Sun-
day worship.
The churches expect many dis-
charged men to attend in order to
honor their brothers in arms who
have paid the supreme sacrifice.
SEVERAL INJURED
IN STRIKE CLSH
SHIP FIRMS THREATEN LOCKOUT
UNLESS STRIKERS RENEW
WORK TODAY
Glasglow, Jan. 31.-Forty persons
were injured here in connection with
the shipbuilders strike. Clashes be-
tween police and strikers this even-
ing had ceased but the city was in
semi-darkness because of shortage of
labor.
(By Associated Press)
Belfast, Jan. 31.-The ship build-
ing firms here have notified the
strikers that unless they renew work
on a 47 hour a week basis tomor-
row; the employers will substitute a
six week lockout.
Honor to be Rule
In Tech Colleges
Not only engineers but all students;
taking examinations in the College of
Engineering and Architecture should
be subject to the rulings of the honor
system unless they request other-
wise at the time of examination, was
the $ecision of the engineering hon-
or committee at a meeting yesterday.
.The committee makes this an-
nouncement for the benefit of the new
men in the department and to clear
,up any misunderstanding which may
exist between the engineering college
and members of other schools who
are taking examinations in this col-
lege.
Communications properly addressed
will reach the engineering honor
committee through the University
messenger boxes.
ORATORICAL BOARD
PLANS PROGRAM

FIVE DIVISIONS ONLY NOT RI
TURNED AFTER MAY 1 LAT-
EST DATA SHOWS
DISCHARGED MEN
MAY SHARE BONU
Committees Agree on Paying D1
charged Men Regardless
of Service
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 31. - Whatever for
es may be sent to Turkey for ga
risoning purposes, there will be i
American troops among them it d
veloped today. It is pointed out th
their use for this purpose would '
inappropriate, as the United Stat
has never been at war with Turke
Troops Will Get Stations
The military committee of the s
preme council expects within a fe
days to report a plan for the allc
ment among thew various nations,
the troops to be retained on ti
western front. From data availab
it appears that by April 1 there w
be 15 American divisions remainii
on the line, with five divisions rear
for embarkation homeward. A mon
later it is expected this aggrega
will be reduced by five divisions,
which 10 will be on the line and fi
ready to return.
U. S. Troops Home Soon
The length of the stay in Franc
of these 10 divisions, depends up(
the time of the signing of the ge
eral peace treaty. It is said that
soon as that appears, all the Ame
ican troops probably will be wit
drawn.
BILL PROVIDES BONUS
(By Associated Press)
Washi'ngton, Jan. 31.-An amen
went to the war revenue bill provi
Jng for a payment of $50 to enlist
men and navy men, and $200 to c
ficers of the army, navy, and m
rine corps, upon discharge frc
service has been agreed upon
house ,and senate committees. U
der the agreement, the bonus wot
be given to enlisted men and office
already mustered out, as well
those yet to be discharged, regar
les of whether service was at hoi
or overseas. Field clerks and 01
ers attached to the fighting fore
would share in the bonus.
JAPAN FACES 10 PER CENT
. SHORTAGE IN RICE CR(

AMERICAN TROOP't
HOME ON SI6NIN
Of PEACE TREI

be made a
Butts had
speakers
price was

t once. He said that7
offered to secure
for the occasion.
fixed at 40 cents per;

Dean
two
The
man,
taken

(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 31.-President

Wilson

and part of the expense to be
from the class treasury.

t

and the Allied prime ministers, this
afternoon, considered the Balkan
problem, particularly, the disputes be-
tween the Serbians and Rumania.
The commission charged with exam-
ining the labor problem, compensa-
tion and damages, shortly will begin
their work.
The inter-Allied commission on
Poland met this morning and decided
to adopt a draft report which will be
submitted to the conference commit-
tee. The conclusion will be formu-
lated by M. Noulens.
PROFESSOR GETCHEY TO LEAVE
TO GIVE FRENCH AT SYRACUSE
Prof. George S. Getchev, of the
French department, will soon leave
for Syracuse, N. Y., where he will as-
sume the duties of instructor in
French at the University of Syracuse.
Professor Getchev, who is a grd-
uate of Harvard, has been connected
with the University faculty for two
years. His successor has not yet been
announced.
Union to Discontinue'Friday Dances
Union Membership dances will not
be held on Friday nights during the
examination period. The Saturday
night dances will be held as usual
without interruption. Tickets will be
on sale at 5 o'clock each Thursday

Almost all the class signified their
intention of attending.
EDUCATORS CONFER
AT YPSI MEETING
Michigan was represented yesterday
at the mid-year educational confer-
ence held at Ypsilanti, by President
Harry B. Hutchins and Prof. A. S.
Whitney. Supt. G. L. Jenner, presi-
dent of the Southeastern Michigan
Round Table, presided.
The speakers were:- Dr. C. W.
Crampton, supervisor of physical
training, New York City, and Dr. Wil-
liam C. Bagley and Dr. Franklin H.
Giddings, of Columbia university. The
subjects of their talks were: "A For-
ward Looking Physical Training Pro-
gram," "The University High School,"
and "What Americanism Do We
Want." The conference will continue
through today.
Sleiveland to Launch Big Float
eveland, 0., Jan. 31.-The first
large concrete car float to be built in
this part ol the country will be
launched here soon from the drydocks
of the Liberty Ship Building and
Transportation company.
The float, which will be used in
New York harbor in the transporta-
tion of railroad cars, is 365 feet long
and made of reinforced concrete. -

Eight or 10 speakers of national
reputation will be secured to address
the- Oratorical students at their meet-
ing this year, the board decided yes-
terday. Local contests in public
speaking will be vigorously support-
ed, campus dramatics encouraged, and
the former lyceum course idea will
be pushed again by the organization.
The lyceum, ,curse * was a promi-
nent force on the campus in previous
years. Under this head comes the
preparation of spaeches by students
with talent in this field, to be given
in the towns about Ann Arbor. In
former years these representatives of
Michigan's oratorical program have
been favorably received.
Plans of reorganization of the Ora-
torical board were discussed, but for
the present the board will remain as
it is. A committee was appointed to
consider further changes and to re-
port at the next meeting.
BERLIN GOVERNMENT SENDS
TROOPS TO QUELL DISORDER

lIexican Generals Ask for Release
Mexico City, Jan. 31.-More than
50 generals of the Mexican army, who'
took up arms during the revolution
have asked the chief executive to re-
lease them from their military duties
so that they may return to civil pur-
suits.

Buenos Aires Settles Port Disputes
(By.Associated Press)
Buenos Aires, Jan. 31.-The princi-
pal differences between the port work-
ers who are striking and their em-
ployers, it is understood, were ad-
justed last night. Minor negotia-
tions are still in progress.

Tokio (Correspondence of the Asso-
ciated Press.-The shortage of the
rice crop is causing unusual anxiety
throughout Japan. The crop this year
is 30,00,000 bushels less than the
average. As the annual consumption
is 300,000,000 bushels, the supply for
the next year is short exactly 10 per
cent. Riceless days are suggested but
it is not easy to adopt the plan of
western countries and enforce riceless
days, after the example of wheatless
days.
In America, wheat bread forms a
relatively small part of the daily
food, whereas in Japan and all east-
ern countries, rice is consumed in
large quantities and constitutes the
real meal, the other food articles be-
ing of the nature of relishes or side-
dishes, so while the phrase "riceless
days" is easily spoken, it would prac-
tically mean foodless days for the
mass of the people.
FOOD ADMINISTRATION LOSES
ALL POWER AFTER MARCH 1
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 31.-Removal of
all restrictions on marketing of
products and foodstuffs, except cot-
ton seed products, and eggs, and can-
cellation of most license require-
ments placed upon importers and dis-
tributers, effective tomorrow, were
announced today by a proclamatior
signed by Wilson at Paris, for the
food administration.
This virtually brings to an end
most of the power of the food ad
ministration. It was predicted by of.
ficials that most of the remaining
functions would cease after March 1

Important Announcement
TO MEMBERS OF A. C. A.
The regular meeting of the Ann Arbor branch ofthe asso-
ciation of Collegiate Alumnae will be held Saturday, Feb. i, at
2:30 at Newberry Residence instead of at the home of Mrs. F.
M. Scott, 1351 Washtenaw, as was previously announced.

(Havas Agency)
Paris, Jan. 31.-Berlin government
decided to send troops to Brennen to
maintain order. Gustav Noske, head
of the government bureau for defen-
sive measures, justified the action
upon the ground that the situation
could not be endured. He said a
small majority was seeking to im-
pose their rule by violence. He add-
ed that the troops sent there would
not fire a shot unless first offered vio-
lence.
1,000,000 Alied Trops to Wateh Rhine
Paris, Jan. 31. - The number of
American, French, and British troops
to be maintained on the Rhine will
be limited to 1,000,000 men, accord-
ing to the Paris papers.

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