100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 11, 1918 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'A

(2HIGAN DAILY

FICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICH IGAN
shed every morning except Monday
the university year by the Board in
of Student Publications.
ER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled
use for republication of all news dis-
credited to it or not otherwise credited
paper and also the local news pub-
herein.
red at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
an, as second class matter.
:riptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
es: Ann Arbor Press Building.
es: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
munications not to exceed 300 words,
ed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
print, but as an evidence of faith, and
of events will be published in The
it the discretion of the Editor, if left
aailed to the office.
fned communications will receive no
ration. No manuscript will be re-
unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the
nts expressed in the communications.
d C. Mighell.......Managing Editor
Makinson.........Business Manager
d A. Gaines..Advertising Manager
E. Abele.......Publication Manager
N. Gaethke.......Circulation Manager
BUSINFSS STAFF
M. Major Howard S. Velleman
RIDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1918.
Night Editor-Ruth Dailey

S YOUR EYESIGHT GOOD?
e of the most unconscious kinds
lfishness which is yet most ter-
in its total world-wide effect, is
habit of being interested only in
own life and what touches it to the
.sion of interest in the lives of
rs and what touches them. So
y of us have beautiful characters
r as our friends, families, evident
atons, and daily contacts go.
intentions toward all the world,
act are good. But a certain de-
of vision-a cataract, almost-
ents us from seeing that our ac-
in relation to the great outside
d are, pragmatically speaking,
:ed. For daily and hourly, we
nit the grievous sins of ignorance
indifference.
e of the good things which have
out of the evil of the great war
he partial awakening from this
,rgy, the quickening of the power
e man in the street to wince at
.ice committed against his broth-
ian, even though he be half a
.d away and as different in lan-
e, customs, and color as east is
west. America will never again
e smug, provincial, money-grab-
nation which it was a decade
We look back upon those care-
world-indifferent first years of
entury, marvelling that we could
been so obsessed with our own
rs, our tariffs, and our trusts, and
rivers and harbors, that we actu-
did not know of the forces which
bringing the other nations of
vorld to this trial of strength.
t we have not gone far enough
rd the cure of the mental eye-
.se commonly called narrowness.
fact that a special course in war
is felt to be needed in the train-
of our student soldiers, in spite
.1 the floods of publicity around
on every side, is proof of the
that our military authorities con-
that the task of renaissance is
partly completed.
the end that it may be a per-
mt change, that we may never
p into our old habits of thought,
s read and think with every day
every day's events as they come,
in our maturity deserve the title
telligent world citizens.
A WORD TO THE UNWISE
ile the present militarization of
University has wrought havoc
form and tradition, there are yet
?v of the old creeds to which we
adhere. One of these doctrines
h should be fostered and kept
is that one which requires fresh-
arriving in Ann Arbor to cast
all preparatory and high school
nla.
is no hardship for the freshman
out of the S. A. T. C. to forego
rearing of high school fraternity
preparatory school sweaters, and
relics of puerile days. It is
r a privilege for them to re-
ce the old allegiance and accept
rniversity as their Alma Mater.
former years all freshmen have
their class "pots"-a bit of head-
by no means ornamental. This-
because of the large percentage
*t-year men in the S. A. T. C.,
s become evident that the wear-
f the freshman "pot" is impracti-+
nd the men of 1922 have there-;
been released from the duty of
;ing the official headdress.
shmen not in the S. A. T. C. and
hers of that organization when
ity should be respectful towards1
clasemen. To this end a care-1
erusal of the Michigan handbook
shed gratis by the "Y" would be

towards a number of campus institu-
tions. This view is entirely false. It
is their privilege to help keep up these
institutions while the men formerly
Identified with student activities are
serving the common cause.
I-
The freshmen of today do not have
the good fortune to come into contact
with the very essence of Michigan-
the Michigan of ante-bellum days;
but they can minimize their loss by
imbibing to the greatest possible ex-
tent of Michigan spirit as it now ex-
ists. To this end every freshman
should contribute to the upholding of
all worth-while traditions. It is not
for the personal satisfaction of up-
perclassmen that they are asked to do
this, but for their own sakes and
above all-for the good of Michigan.
REGARDING CO-OPERATION
Instructors holding classes which
are to be dismissed at 11:30 and 2:30
o'clock can co-operate effectively with
the military authorities and with their
students by releasing the men a few
minutes before the half-hour. It takes
some time for the men to go from
the classroom to the place of forma-
tion, and if they are late in falling in
they are liable to punishment.
Members of the S. A. T. C. will ap-
preciate the thoughtfulness of instruc-
tors who give them ample time to
reach their formation before "Atten-
tion" is called, and there will be a
greater esprit de corps between in-
structors,and students.
Turkey has been at war except dur-
ing short intervals since 1909. She
is now beaten for the fourth time and
still doesn't quit. She must be trying
for an endurance record.
Our soldiers in France are evening
up the deaths from influenza in the
cantonments by working overtime to
kill extra Germans.
Sacrificing of luxuries now to buy
Liberty bonds will save us from sac-
rificing liberties later.
If the football team is short of
material, why not call out the women?
It is done these days.
REGISTRAR HALL CHOSEN HEAD
OF CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION
Registrar Arthur G. Hall was elect-
ed president of the local board of ed-
ucation Wednesday night. The res-
ignation of Mr. D. W. Springer as
president and member of the board
was accepted.
D. W. Springer has been in army Y.
M. C. A. service for some time, and he
has been appointed divisional educa-
tional director for the "Y." His terri-
tory extends from North Dakota to
Kentucky and from Colorado to West
Virginia. He will devote his time ex-
clusively to that work from now on.
A week ago he was elected president
of the board of education for the com-
ing year and his resignation was un-
expected.
RED CROSS DOES BIG AMOUNT
OF WORK DURING MONTH

Dramatic Clubs
Hard Hit 21y War
Dramatic, at Michigan this year
will probably be almost entirely neg-
lected. With the large proportion of
men on the campus in the S. A. T. C.,
the burden of production would neces-
sarily be on the girls and such talent-
ed young men as are not in other
service. It is early in the year for a
definite report but the outlook just
now is not bright.
A dramatic association, formed dur-
ing the summer months, which was to
include all the organizations on the
campus under a common executive
head, is now faced with inactivity and
must wait on the phrase, "after the
war." This co-operative dramatic as-
sociation was to have its ultimate goal
in the establishment of a University
theater, possibly taking over the Ma-
jestic. It was to have costumes in
common ownership, tickets issued at
a central office, and otherwise sup-
port and bring together the weaker
and stronger organizations for their
mutual benefit. . It is hoped that this
good purpose will not be overlooked
under the stress of the present year.
MECHANICS CALL
OFF ACTIVITIES
Social acivities for the four com-
panies of Section B, S. A. T. C., have
ben called off, according to informa-
tion given out yesterday afternoon.
The reason for the cancelling of the
social functions is due to the Span-
ish influenza quarantine.
Althonugh the meibers of the train-
ing detachment have been released
from quarantine, there is so little time
left before their departure from the
city that nothing can be given or
planned.
Members of first company were to
hold. a dance at the Armory tomorro
night for the purpose of disposing of
the company fund. Each of the three
remaining companies were to have a
affair of some variety for the same
purpose.
The floor which caved in at Wat-
erman gymnasium Sunday night has
been repaired. Cots have been placed
on the new floor, and the men are
now assigned to their former bunks.
PROF. W. H. HOBBS ADVOCATES .
GT. BRITAIN'S SEA SUPREMACY
Prof. W. H. Hoobs' lecture, "The
Freedom of the Seas Alike in Peace
and in War," was given at 4:30 o'clock
yesterday afternoon in the auditorium
of the Natural Science building. The
lecture, the second of the series, was
based on the second of President Wil-
son's peace articles, issued Jan. 8,
1918. Professor Hobbs regards Pres-
ident Wilson's recent peace note as the
second step toward compromise peace.
The first step, he asserts, was taken
when the 14 peace articles were is-
sued.
In his lecture, Professor Hobbs enu-
merated the advantages to other na-
tions resulting from Great Britain's
supremacy on the sea. For the last
half century, merchantment have been
protected, no impressment of sailors
has been allowed, the slave trade has
been stopped, and commerce has been
uninterrupted. During the war the
coasts of France have been protected
and Germany has been driven from the
sea .by the British fleet. Moreover,
by means of the blockade accomplish-
ed by British fleets, Germany's morale
has been so lowered that her resist-
ance to the Allies' advance has been

unsuccessful.
For these reasons, Professor Hobbs
is convinced, that to maintain the doc-
trine of freedom of the seas, alike in
peace and in war would be to play di-
rectly into Germany's hands, and that'
it should be thrown into the scrap
heap with its twin, "Peace Without
Victory."
NURSE DIES OF INFLUENZA
CONTRACTED FROM PATIENTS
Sister Mary Ligouri, age 24, died
from pneumonia at 4:30 o'clock yes-.
terday afternoon at the St. Joseph's
hospital. Several days ago she be-
came a victim of the Spanish influenza
and her case immediately developed
into pneumonia. Sister Mary Ligouri
came to the University from the Moth-
er House, Dubuque, Iowa, last sum-
mer, and intended to take up the study
of pharmacy. But when the influenza
epidemic spread to Ann Arbor and the
hospitals appealed for help, she im-
mediately sacrificed her work in the
University to nurse those stricken
with the disease.
Saving Stamps Kept by Purchasers
Washington, Oct. 9. - Only three-
quarters of 1 per cent, or $5,570,000 of:
the $766,000,000 war savings stamps
purchased to date have been offered;
for redemption, the treasury depart-C
ment announced today.

i

VIomen
Freshman and sophomore girls may
obtain their gymnasium outfits in the
basement of Barbour gymnasium
Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of
next week from 9:30 to 11:30 o'clock.
This . will be the last opportunity,
otherwise an extra charge will be
made.
Freshman and sophomore girls will
meet for their first class in outdoor
gymnasium work in Barbour gymna-
sium Monday and Tuesday respective-
ly of next week. Be sure to see ap-
pointment schedule before that time.
Upperclass girls interested in hoc-
key may see Miss Marian Wood at 4
o'clock Monday, Oct. 14.
The sophomore girls will meet with
Dean Myra B. Jordan at 4 o'clock Fri-
day afternoon.
BELGIAN RELIEF GATHERING
CLOTHING FOR DESTITUTES
The Belgian Relief headquarters in
the Cornwall block at the corner of
Huron street and Fourth avenue has
succeeded in collecting and packing
more than two tons of clothes. These
will be sent to Newark, N. J. Most
of these clothes have been donated by
the residents of Ann Arbor. The stu-
dents have done little so far, but still
have an opportunity. Mrs. G. W. Pat-
terson is at the headquarters from 10
o'clock until 4 in the afternoon. If
clothes cannot be delivered, Mrs. Pat-
terson, phone number 2214, will send
someone to call for them.
A special appeal is being made to
students at this time because many
of the men are discarding their ci-
vilian clothes for uniforms. President
Harry Hutchins, having received an
appeal from the Belgian Relief com-
mission, has made a strong appeal to
the S. A .T. C. men as well as others
to send their clothes to Newark. The
army men as a whole are expected to
comply. The local relief headquar-
ters offer their assistance in sending
the clothes, thus - facilitating ship-
ment. Mrs. Patterson desires that
students be as prompt in this matter

Wah r'

s

TEXT BOOKS and
ENGINEERS' SUPPLIES

Military Books for the S. A. T. C.

Main St.

WAHR'S

State St.

p.'

Your

every Banking ned

fulfilled at the

Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

University Bookstore

THE "Y" INN AT LANE HALL
FOR MEN AND WOMEN
LUNCH 40 CENTS DINNER 50 CENTS
BY THE WEEK, $5.00-FOR LUNCH AND DINNER
HOME COOKING
GOOD FOOD
ATTRACTIVE SURROUNDINGS

as possible, for cold weather will soon
set in.
Preserve your Michigan tradition.
Subscribe now for the Daily, $3.50.

b k

a

The monthly meeting of the Ann Ar-
bor chapter of the Red Cross was held
Tuesday.night. During the month of
September, 24 pairs of pajamas, 90
operating gowns, 2,000 wipes, 1,000
pads, and 250 split irrigation pads
were made. In addition, 85 pairs of
socks, 20 sweaters, 40 helmets, and 20
wristlets were completed. No yarn
was received for distribution last
month. All hands have been busy
this week making masks for the S. A.
T. C. men. Up to Thursday 1,175 had
been given out to the various infirm-
aries. -
Ruth Rizer, '07, Dies of Influenza
News of the death of Miss Ruth Riz-
er, '07, Monday in Washington from
the effects of Spanish influenza, was
received here yesterday. Miss Rizer
was identified with a number of civic
and philanthropic organizations in
Washington.
She was the daugter of Col. Henry
C. Rizer ,chief clerk of the United
States geological survey. Just before
her death she had planned to take a
year's leave of absence to go to France
as a war worker under the auspices
of the Y. M. C. A. She was a great
worker in the Y. W. C. A. while at the
University.
Loud, ex-'18, Dies in Plane Encounter
Word has been received of the death
of Lieut. Harold E. Loud, ex-'18, in an
air battle at the front. Loud enlisted
in aviation about a year ago, and re-
ceived his training in Texas. He left
for overseas this summer. Loud's
plane caught fire from anti-air craft
bombs He stuck to his post and
brought the machine down, but died
of his bumns. He was a member of
Beta Theta Pi fraternity.
You will always find satisfact'on by
adveritsing in the Daily.-Adv.

illlll.lll lll lllll lll lllllllll~l l n ln lrn u l u ll l
uya
r-
!-
Sae10pr etonyurLunr_
Bils.!
_- Nomrronotsit rudnc
s- Al-od ahdi otwtr
! -
_= r
1= -
s U AO IL ALPOPL
1= -

To the Newcomer
YOU can obtain
DINy your Sweater, Jer-
TRADE *1 sey, Shoes, Foot
OBall EIquipment, or
anything else'in the
athletic line, by
MARK mail from our Chi-
IN as eisly as if you
S. PS"° called in f~erson.
Write for catalog of Fall and
Winter Sports '
A. G. SPALDING & BRO'S.
211-217 S. State St. CHICXLO
Shorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping
New Term
OCTOBER 7
Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.

I

I

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:25
a. in., S:xo a. mn. and hourly to 8:ro p. M.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m,. and every hour to 8:48 p. in.
Local Cars EastcBound-5 :35 a. in., 6:40
a. in., 7:05 a. m. and every two hours to
7:05 p.,im., 8:05 p. in., 9:o5 p. in., xo:5o p.
in. To Ypsilanti only: 8:05 P.in., 9 :5o p.
m-., 11:45 P. in., 1 ::b a. in., 1 :20 a. in.
To Saline change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-6:os a. m., 7:48
a. M., 10:20 p. M., 12a:ommidnight.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars,
8:48, 10:48 a. M., 12:48, 2:48, 4:48, 6:48
To Jackson and Lansing, Limited car, 8:48
P. in.
Additional Cars to Ypsilanti- :5o a.m:,
2:05, 6:oS, 9:45 p. m., 12:20 midnight.

University Students
The Army and Navy headquarters
for cleaning and altering uniforms is
situated at the corner of N. University
and Ingalls, where your khaki garments
will receive special attention by expert
workmen.
We call for and deliver with
i Day Service
W. L. SLEDGE, Prop.
Open from 7:oo a. m. to 9:30 p. m.
Phone 2734.W; 22644
WE BUY DISCARDED CLOTHES

l

WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R
314 S. State St. Ann Arbor
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank,
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources ....... .$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

eable that some men
a patronizing attitude

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan