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January 28, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-28

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1919.

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
,curing the university year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
'(EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
so the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and also the local news pub-
Ashed herein.
Etered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
lidchigan, as second class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.5.
Offices: Ann Arbor Pres Building.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, a44.
Communications not to exceed 300. words,
a signed, the 'signature not necessarily to ap-
per in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
notices of events will be published in The
[Daily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
at r mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
consideration. No manuscript will be re-
Jurned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
sentiments expressed in the communications.
Clarence L. Roeser...........Editor-in-Chief
Mildred C. Mighell........Managing Editor
Harold Makinson...........Business Manager
Vincent H. Riordan. ..News Editor
Charles R. Osius, Jr............City Edaor
Marguerite Clark............Night Editor
David B. Landis........Sport Editor
Martha Guernsey..........Women's Editor
Mark . Ehibert ..........Associate Editor
EHelen 1. Davis....l.......... Literary Editor
LeGrand A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
Agnes L. Abele......Publication Manager
Donald M. Major......Circulation Manager
Wm. M. LeFevre...........Office Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
Jbseph A. Bernstein , Paul G. Weber
Horace W. Porter Philip Ringer
Ruth Dailey E. D. Flintermann
REPORTERS
Margaret Christie Herman Lustfield
Irene .Ellis. Renaud Sherwood
Rdna Apel Henry O'Brien
Marie Crozier Mary D. Lane
BUSINESS STAFF
Mark B. Covell Robert E. McKean
E ward Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
Eva "R. Welsh Wn. A. Leitzinger
George A. Cadwell Donnell R. Shoffner
Joel F. Schoerger Henry Whiting II
TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1919.
Issue Editor-Philip Ringer
'SHUN!
To all men back from the service,
welcome.
You're out of it now, out of reveille
and retreat, and kitchen police, and
guard duty.
Ann Arbor once more! Ann Arbor
With her countless chances for inform-
ation and diversion! At first it will
seem a bit strange. The haze of mem-
ory of a year or two years has drifted
between the real University life, and
the life before the war. But the
strangeness will vanish. The present
will come into its own.
Don't live in the past. Live today.
Bring to bear all the experience of the
past two years in work and play.
Work hard, play hard. Do something
for Michigan. Something more than
you did when you were here last.
Don't feel like a "has-been." You're
not. The University, in a gentler, but
no less imperative voice than the old
drill sergeant used to use, says:
'Shun! '
The Harvard Crimson reports it is
becoming common practice for stu-
dents to "crib' 'books from the libra-
ry; Sing, oh, sing of the moral decay
of America's self-styled Athens-for
The Crimson Points with pride that
most of the stolen books displayed a
legning toward the classics.
After journeying through France
and Germany, the American army will
flnd it difficult, when it returns, to
get up any enthusiasm for the girl
who can talk nothing but plain United
States.

We learn that publishers of geogra-
phies are selling out their plates. Thus
pass the last supporters of status quo.
JITY WILL SPEND $70,000
ON PAVING IN COMING YEAR
Pavement construction for the com-
ng year will be discussed at the meet-
ng of the board of works and the
streets committee of the Ann Arbor
city council tonight. Seventy thous-
nd dollars is to be spent during the
oming year on street improvements.
There have been no pavements built
luring the last three years and the
:ity engineer will ask that a sum be
set aside annually for the work that
here 'may be a consistent yearly
treet paving program planned.
002 Enemy Aliens Interned by U. S.
Washington, Jan. 25.-Four thous-
tnd and two enemy aliens were in-
erned by the United States during the
var, the department of justice in-
ormed the house emmigration com-
nittee yesterday, which is consider-
ng a bill authorizing the deportation
>f these people. Twenty-two hundred
f them were merchant seamen and
he remainder residents.

. 1 6 00.1

A Pied Galley

"There's a crop out there to gather,"
Said the captain kind of solemn,
"There's a crop out there to gather
In the wheat field just ahead." S
Thru the wood of Chateau Thierry
Wound our tired and dusty column.
(Oh at dawn the wheat was yellow
But at night the wheat was red.)
Who Said Dancing's Good for, Shell
Shock?
Doc May says that it takes a month
to put the gym floor back into shape
after a mixer. How about the mixer-
ites themselves? An eye for an eye,
a tooth for a tooth, etc., and on with
the dance.
Sixty Cents a Dozen
Hle was a plutocrat forsooth,
And ruffled by no worldly care,
A common, sordid million-heir.
I know full well I speak the truth
My deduction is the best,
I got an A in Rhetoric IV.*
The first time that I looked him o'er,
I spotted egg upon his vest....
POETIC LICENSE.
Our Daily Novelete
The sun was sinking behind the ar-
tificial. limb factory on the hill and
with the last blush of the day the vio-
let shadows of the gloaming were
misting across the apple green of the
zenith. She stood facing the window
in a room in University Hospital, her
tender eyes aglow with tears. There
was an indescriablg air of gentleness
about her and in her nurse's costume
of white she seemed a lily transplant-
ed from some bosky dell, frail, ether-
eal-with the subtle hint of mothballs
issuing from her coiffure.
She turned to the sobbing figure on
the cot and the lustrous tears welled
anew. A soul was passing into the
great beyond. All would be stillin a
few moments. She crossed the room
and knelt at the side of the pain
racked figure.
"Have you nothing to ray, no insur-
ance? Isn't there one last word,
no-."
"No. No." He gulped, "Only this
terrible blow to my self respect, this
staggering shock. To think that after
breaking the speed laws of seventeen
states I was finally run down by an
Ann Arbor street car."
THE END.
Twenty Years enee
Joe Parker's Raspberry Shrub Inn.
No. gentlemet allowed without lady
escorts.
Huston's Social Rendezvous. Flinch
and five hundred, twenty cents an
hour. Popcorn while you wait. Bowl-
ing salon and modiste on second floor.
Buy him a violet Milo while you re-
juvenate your bangs. Gentlemen with
woolen hose will please wear galosh-
es.
"The Lucille," Art Marquardt. Gen-
tlemen's accordion platting done here.
Dainty georgette crepe breakfast caps
for men of taste. Buy one of our nov-
elty orange pekoe dinner vests and
carry your own sugar lumps.
Ramous Closing Lines
To think that some- men get paid
for doing this,
--OMAR.
BRITAIN, AMUSED BY PLAN OF
INTERNATIONAL PROHIBITION
London, Jan. 25.--Great Britain is
amused at the expressed ambitions
of the Anti-Saloon league to make
the world dry by 1930. The Ameri-
can Anti-Saloon League is about to
establish a chain of headquarters
throughout Europe and Africa.
George Bernard Shaw, commenting
yesterday upon the action which the

league is about to take, said, "Yes,
it will have a very considerable influ-
ence. We are, or should be, infinitely
obliged to America for making the ex-
periment."
The concensue of opinion seems to
be, however, that American interven-
tion will not have a noticeable effect
upon the liquor business abroad,
Students read The Daily.-Adv.

END of WAR RELIEF
TO BUILDING SITUATION
SOLDIERS WILL BRING BACK
DESIRE FOR GOOD
ARCHITECTURE
"Now that conditions are becoming
more normal with the close of the
war, American wealth will undoubted-
ly assert itself in the building c: many
large structures, both commercial ed-
ifices and buildings for more peaceful
pursuits such as libraries, art mu-
seums, schools and hospitals," says
Prof. Emil Lorch, head of the College
of Architecture. "The field for men
of architectural training will be broad-
er than ever before because of the ex-
tensive war-postponed building pro-
gram that will be carried on in the
next few years.
"tUudoubtedly those men who return
from abroad will bring with them a
'desire for good architecture," says
Professor Lorch. "This is the least
that should be expected of those who
nave been quartered in such towns and
cities as Lille, Tours, and Paris with
their wealth of fine buildings, streets,
parks and gardens.
"Some oftour graduates and former
students who have been in the service
overseas and who are now about to
be discharged," continues Professor
Lorch, "are being strongly urged to
stay abroad for specific study of the
'Ecole des Beaux Arts' in Paris. Sure-
ly such an opportunity as they have
to study in this school should not be
missed at any cost.
"Soon after America entered the
war, our government stopped all build-
ing activities except those that were
essential to the war program, Now,
quite the opposite, they are doing
work to encourage increased building
activity. ,
For this-purpose, there has been es-
tablished a special bureau as a branch
of the Department of Labor, to furnish
information about building conditions
and labor." This department has
been sending out posters and other
literature to architects and builders
to encourage building both large proj-
ects and small homes.
According to Secretary of Labor
Wilson, one of the main objects of
this campaign is to furnish employ-
ment for returned soldiers. The
building industry is ordinarily one of
the most important in the country
and, with construction well on its feet
again, one of the largest sources of
employment will be opened up.

MICHIGAN ALUMNAE
TO HOLD LUNCHEONj
In accordance with pre-war custom
the Detroit association of University
of Michigan women will hold its an-!
nual luncheon at 1 o'clock on Feb. 22
in the new Hotel Cadillac. Ann Arbor
alumnae and University women are
cordially invited to attend.
Theassociationhas as one of its
main objects, the financial assistance
of Alumnae house and part of the pro-:
gram will be given over to its present
status and the plans for the future.
It is suggested that, as in the past,"
organized groups send a representa-
tive from the senior class. All alum-
nae will be seated together and they
will be especially welcomed.
Tickets at $1 a piece may be pro-
cured by mail from Vera Burridge, '15,
872 S. Antoine stree, Detroit, and
should be obtained not later than Feb.
15.
MAJOR PETERSON RETURNS
AFTER 18 MONTHS' SERVICE

Engineers

4

BUY THEM NOW - -THAT SET OF
D r iigInstruments
$15.00, $18.00, $25.00, $28.00 THE SET
Some Bargains in Second-Hand Sets
UNIVERSITY
A BOOKSTORE
ITHE "Y" INN AT LANE HALL I

Students!

Eat Inhere you get the proper kind of food
All home cooked food

Major Reuben Peterson of the med-
ical department has received his hon-
orable discharge from the medical
corps of the army, and is back in Ann
Arbor after 18 months of continu-
ous service. Immediately after Amer-
ica's entrance into the war, Dr. Pet-
erson was made a major.
He went on active duty as aide to
Governor Sleeper, under the provost-
marshal-general, with headquarters
at Lansing. In this capacity he di-
rected the medical work of the dif-
ferent draft boards of the state and
helped in organizing all of the advis-
ory medical boards of the state.
FOUR PROFESSORS TO SPEAK
TO YPSILANTI ORGANIZATION
Lectures will be held on the four
Monday evenings in February under
the auspices of the Contemporary
club of Ypsilanti. The speakers will
be Prof. C. H. Tyne of tlie history de-
partment; Mr. A. E. Wood of the so-
ciology department; Prof. . W. A.
Frayer of the history department,
and Prof, F. N. Scott of the rhetoric
department, all of this University. The
lectures are to be held in the Cen-
tral high school of Ypsilanti.
Last year's opera, "Iet's Go!' was
the first Michigan Union opera in
which girl students participated.
Twenty-six girls appeared on the
stage and 28 men.

Lunch--11:45-12:45
Dinner-5:30-6:30
Lunch and Dinner, per week
Service Table d'Hote d

:
:

40C
5-OC

Open to Men and Women

SHEEHAN & CO
FIX UP THE OLD ROOM
EYE SHADES MAKE WORK EASIER
PENNANTS AND WALL BANNERS MAKE YOUR ROOM INVITING
Here's hoping you have a fine New Year.-Sheehan
A fine Line of Spring Millinery
is noAP being displayed at the Parlors of
STEVENS& PERSIHING, 618 Packard

FOR LIBERTY
The following casualties are report-
ed today by the commanding general
of the American Expeditionary Forc-
es: Died from wounds, 13; died of ae-
cident and other causes, 3; wounded
severely, 105; missing in action, 1$.
Total, 129.

waeti cti

I

The basketball schedule for the
week is as follows: Uonday, seniors
and sophomores at 5 o'clock; Tuesday,
seniors and freshmen at 5 o'clock;
Wednesday, juniors and sophomores,
at 3 o'clock; Thursday, juniors and
freshmen at 5 o'clock, Teams will be
chosen by Feb. 15.
All girls taking required gymnasium
work of any kind must take posture
examinations to complete the work.
These examinations will be given Jan.
29, 30, anj 31, in the basement of Bar-
bour gymnasium. Appointments for
examinations should be made at
once,
There will be an important meet-
ing of Masques at 4:30 o'clock tomor-
row afternoon in Sarah Caswell Ang-
ell hall. All members are urged to
be present.
Latin-Americans Offered Free Tuition
Washington, Jan. 27.- Free tuition
has been offered by fifty American col-
leges and universities to students from
Latin-American countries, Twenty
students from Latin-America were
granted scholarships to American uni-
versities last year but on account of
war conditions only five of them were
able to reach this country.
Ke p posted - subscribe for the
Daily, now $3.00.-Adv.

Our Own Pack
Betsy Ross Candies
The Fivest Candies For Gift
Purposes and9SocialOccasions
Modish Boxes, Baskets
and Containers
High Class Only
No.9, Nickels Arcade
-.
Try our HOME-MADE.
CANDI ES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 907 109 S, iulu St
DETROIT UNITE] LINE
Between Detroit, Ann Arbai and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express C rs-7:10 a.
mn., and hou~rly to 9:10 p. m.-
Jackson Limited and Express Gars-8;48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Gars East Bound-6:Qo a.' m., Brd
every two hours to o: Qp. M., 10:50 p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, it:45 p i., eo a. n.
i :xo a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. r.. to
12:20 a. 1f.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a, m. to 12:00 p. ip.
Phone .690-Jp
314 , StAte St. An Arbor
Courteous and satisfaetory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the Account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Saings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $55,000.00
Resources........$4000,000.01
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North Univergity Ave.
0- D. MORRILL,
Typewriters 4' -
Typewriting .-
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Niokels Arcade Phone 1718
First Floor

A.

I. dl

Students

of the University of Michigan are cordially invited to
inspect our new lite of

Dermal Cream
Chaps
Quarry DrgCos
Prescription Store
COR. SOUTH STATE STREET AND N. UNIVERSITY AVENUE
PHONE 308

Winter Suits
and
Overcoats

I

Newest materials, newest models, newest
lowest prices

colorings,

ant.

irst four Michigan teams
out by - Yost won 43 games-

'
rl

Ig

1,

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