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January 28, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-28

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THE WEAHR
PARTLY CLOUDY
AND COOLER

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AN)D NIGHT' WIRE
SERVICE

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VOL. XXIX. No. 87.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1919.

PRICE THREE CENTS

AMERIGAN PARTY
ORGA9NIZED:s TO GET
FACS ON RUSSIA
COMMITTEE COMPOSED OF MANY
PROMINENT AMERICAN
EDITORS
SOVIETS SAID TO HAVE
SOLUTION OF PROBLEMS
Lenine Ready to Redeem Loans and
S C6nfuine Activities to
Reconstruction
New York, Jan. 27.-Organization
of the "Truth About Russia" com-
mittee by a number of American
publicists was announced here ta-
night, acompanied by a statement de-
claring that the Soviet government
in Russia is governing that coupL
try "in an orderly fashion; and have
a solution of the Russian problem "
Many Prominent Editors
The committee includes Alden
Johnson, an editor of The New Re-
public Henry R. Mussey, Albert J.
Nock and William McDonald, ed
of the Nation; Paul Kellog, editor of
the Survey; Martin Johnston. Harold
Sterius and Robert Lovett, editors of
the Dial; Frank P. Walsh, former
ber of the war labor board; Jane
Addams, of Hull house, Chicago, and
Amos Pinchot.
Purpose to Gather Information
Its purpose is explained "as an
American movement" to gather au-
thentic information on Russian af-
fairs and in general to attempt to
present, to American public opin-
ion, as accurate a picture as it is
possible to obtain of the present
status of the Russian revolution.
Lenine Ready to Reconstruct
The Soviet government has never
been pro German they say and Le-
nine is a leader of "the more moder-
ate section," who has been prepared
to conciliate with the western pow-
ers by redeeming the Russian loans
and confining his activities to ef-
forts towards internal reconstruction.
His influence in the government is
declared to be the dominating one as
compared with that of Trotzky, who
in contrast with Lenine "advocates
class war throughout the world.
The action of the Peace congress in
Paris in inviting all political fac-
tions in Russia to the conference, is
indorsed.
LIEUT. J. KENNED Y
HERE ON WAY HOME
Lieut. James A. Kennedy, ex-'20,
who - enlisted in the air service in
Nov., 1917, passed through Ann Arbor
last week on his way to his home in
Lansing.
After his enlistment Kennedy was
sent to the University of Texas,
where he received his ground school
work. He stayed there two months
and was sent to Camp Dick at Dal-
las, Texas, where he was kept for
seven weeks before being transfered
to Toliferro field near Fort Worth,
Tex. After a stay of seven months
at that field he was sent to Garden
City, N. Y., to await transportation
overseas.
Kennedy, after two months of
'watchful waiting," was then sent to
San Diego; Cal. He remained there
four days and was then discharged.
While in the University, Kennedy was
a member of the Phi Delta Theta

fraternity. He expects to re-enter
school the second semester.
Warm Weather Delays Carnival
Unless changes of a radical nature
take place immediately in weather
conditions, the skating carnival which
was to have been held January 29, un-
der the auspices of the Women's Ath-
letic association, will be indefinitely
postponed.

SKIT FEATURE OF
ALL-MEDIC SMOKER
With the best All-medic smoker
held within the memory of the pres-
ent generation, the doctors last night
dedicated the new Union building to
student use. A carefully prepared
program was presented in the big ban-
quet room to an audience that includ-
ed practically the entire jnedical
school.
Wm. E. Howes, '19M, presided as
toastmaster. Prof. R. B. Canfield
spoke of life at a base hospital in
France. Other talks were given by
Prof. F. G1 Novy, and by C. E. Badg-
ley, '19M, Jacob Manting, '20M, N. R.
Smith, '21M, and by T .R. Harrison,
'22M. Musical numbers were sup-
plied by R. R. Dieterle, '21M; the
Midnight Sons quartet, of Joseph
Palma, '20M; D. F. Kudner, '20M; A.
P. Thompson, '21M, and J. S. Kemp,
'22M, and a jazz orchestra directed by
C. S. Wright, '19M.
The feature of the evening was the
closing number, a skit written by Ho-
race W. Porter ,'19M, and presented
by members of the senior class. It
was called "The Surgical Diagnos-
tic,' 'and was a take-off on the medi-
cal faculty. The leads were played
by C. S. Nash and H. F. Becker.
In addition to the usual smokes, the
Union management furnished an ex-
cellent luncheon, of fresh cider,
doughnuts, cakes, and fruit.
NOVELTIES BILLED FOR
SPOTLIGHT1VAUDEILLE
JAZZ FEATURES WILL BE COM-
BINED INTO ONE ,
NUMBER
That Michigan is once more taking
a whole-hearted interest in campus
affairs was evidenced last night at the
tryouts for the Spotlight Vaudeville,
to be given Feb. 2 for the benefit
of the American University union of
Paris.
Student actors turned out in full
force and a full bill for the show now
seems assured. There is however, a
dearth of variety and novelty stunts.
Musical numbers, on the other hand,
promise to furnish a problem to the
committee when the final selection is
made, probably the latter part of the
week.
Since several "jazz" orchestras are
competing for a place on the pro-
gram, it is thought the final choos-
ing will result in the consolidation of
the various sets into a musical aggre-
gation of size unusual for campus en-
tertainments.
An instructor in the University
will probably supply a number on the
program, tus furnishing a little pro-
fessional competition between stu-
dents and faculty.
SECRETARY SMITH GOES TO
SICK SON AT WEST POINT
Reynolds R. Smith, ex-'22, son of
Secretary Shirley W. Smith, is critic-
ally ill with empyema, according to
word received yesterday from West
Point military academy where he is a
student. His father has been sum-
moned to his bedside.
Secretary Smith's son contracted
the influenza about five weeks ago and
it immediately developed into pneu-
monia. A few weeks later empyema
set in and it was then that his condi-
tion became critical. He was operated
upon last week and another operation
is to be made within the next two

days.
Smith received a principal appoint-
ment to West Point in October and
began active service there Nov. 1.
Plan Washington Birthday Dance
Washington's birthday will be cele-
brated at the Union on Friday night,
Feb. 21, by an all-campus dance.
Shook's orchestra will furnish the
nay -,ic

ANALYZE SOCALISM
'--SELLERS' ADVICE

Teacher Should Present
Students Dram, Own

Theories;
Con-

clusions1
SOCIALISTIC SOCIETY OFFERS
FAVORABLE REASONS ALONE
"Socialism should be taught in un-
iversities as an objective study, as an
analysis of a significant world wide
moment and not for the purpose of
persuasion," says Prof. R. W. Sellars
of the philosophy department of the
University. "That is, the teacher
should try to present sympathetically
the facts and theories of socialism, but
should leave the student to draw his
own conclusions, believing only that
which he intelligently understands
and wishes to. The doctrines of so-
cialism should be taught just as any
other scientific subject - its history
and development and principles so
that the student may have intelligent
reasons for either accepting or dis-
agreeing with the movement."
Laidler's Statement Partly True
In regard to the statement of Harry
W. Laidler, secretary of the Intercol-
legiate society to the effect that a
comprehension of socialism is neces-
sary to fit a college student for intel-
ligent work of any kind, Professor Sel-
lars said that he considered this true
only so far as the benefit derived from
socialism as a mental training would
be of aid. "The society with which
Mr. Laidler is connected is naturally
a little more radical than any univer-
sity institution would be. because it
is an independent organization the
policy of which is not determined by
a college.
It was originally started to promote
the study of socialism in colleges but
now nearly all the large universities
teach that subject and it has very little
influence among them.
Presents Favorable Reasons
"The fact of the matter is," conclud-
ed Professor Sellars, "that this society
tends more to bringing before the stu-
dents reasons for the ardent espousal
of socialism, whereas we teach the
subject just as any other scientific
study should be and leave students to
adopt its principles or not as they see
fit.
Tickets Limited
for Senior Dance
Tickets for the All-senior dance, to
be held Feb. 14, will go on sale at 7
o'clock Thursday evening in the Un-
ion. This was decided Sunday morn-
ing at ameeting of the All-senior dance
committee which was held in the old
Union building. The price -was set at
$2 a couple. Attention is called to
the fact that the number of tickets
offered is limited, there being provis-
ion made for only 100 couples.
This is the first All-senior dance
ever to be held in the mid-year and
if it proves a success, as it promises
to be, it will become an annual class
affair.
WILSON VISITS RUINS AND
CEMETERY FOR AMERICAN DEAD
Paris, Jan. 27.- President Wilson
visited some of the desolated parts of
France yesterday afternoon and in-
spected the ruined cathedrals and the
country about Chateau Thierry and
Rheims. The presidential party went
over Belleau woods and visited 'the
cemetery in which hundreds of Am-
erican soldiers and marines are bur-
ied. Mrs. Wilson, Rear-Admiral Gray-
son and a few American and French
officers accompanied the President.
Iowa University to Have R. 0. T. C.
About 550 men have signed up for

military classes in the R.. O. T. C. at'
the University of Iowa.I

COUNCIL DEIDES
THOSE TO REMIN
Garrison and Patrolling Force Needed
to Guard Against Possible
Outbreaks
NO DEPARTURE FROM PLANS
Tb RETURN MOST AMERICANS
Paris, Jan. 27-The committee ap-
pointed by the supreme council to
consider how many allied and Amer-
ican troops shall be kept on the west-
ern front, held a meeting today and
received reports from experts con-
cerning the situation on the Rhine
and in Germany.
Progress, it is reported was made
in cleaning up the situation but much
is to be done before the committee is
in a position to make a final recom-
mendation to the supreme council,
concerning the exact number of
soldiers of each-nationality shall be
required for garrison purposes in
Germany and the patrolling of the
frontier against any possible out-
breaks.
The determination of the American
war department to return the Amer-
ican troops now in Europe to their
homes will not be affected by any
decisions reached by the committees.
There will be no departure from the
plan arranged for the return of the
troops, allowance having been made
in advance for the retention in Ger-
many of all American soldiers re-
garded as forming a fair quota for
the United States.
Thursday One Day
to 2i1uy Directory
This year's students' directory is
completed and will be put on sale
'Thursday, Jan. 30. Contrary to the
custom of-former years the sale will
continue for one day only and copies
of the directory can be obtained on
the campus only.
'Because of the fact that the sale
will take place for one day only,
everyone is urged to start out Thurs-
day armed with the necessary 50
cents, for people will be stationed at
University hall, the engineering
arch, and the flag-pole, who will be
more than anxious to sell copies of
the indispensible directory. Copies
may also be bought at the offices of
the Michigan Daily.
Among the features of the new di-
retcory is a revised list of all frater-
nity and sorority houses. A list of the
students and faculty of the Ypsilan-
ti Normal school has also been add-
ed to this year's directory. A tele-
phone list by streets of the students
of this University is included among
the innovations.
As usual the book will include a
complete list of the home and office
addresses and telephone numbers of
the faculty, a list of campus organi-
zations, societies and sectional clubs,
and a list of the student publica-
tions.
A complete and revised list of the
students-of this University and of the
psilanti Normal school will fill the
main part of the directory.
New Children's Hospital Opens Soon
Formal opening of the new Chil
dren's hospital is planned for some
time about the third week in Febru-
ary after the beginning of the second
semester.
This building is adjacent to the
University Homeopathic hospital, and

is expected to accommodate about 70
patients. Dr. Clyde B. Stouffer of the
University Healhh service will be the
superintendent.
Military Drill Favored at Oregon U.
Military drill at the University of
Oregon, under the auspices of the R.
O. T. C., began last week with an %en7
rollment of X50 men. ,

CLUBS TO LEASE
ROOMS IN UNION
About 10 representatives of campus
societies met yesterday afternoon at
the Union to diScuss plans for hous-
ing their respective organizations in
the new-buildings. No definite deci-
siens were reached, as the purpose
of the meeting was merely a discus-
sion of policy.
Three large rooms on the third
,floor have been set aside for use as
society rooms, and it is planned to
lease these to as many organizations
as care to avail themselves of the
opportunity. Four or five societies
will probably share each room and
the rental charges will be apportion-
ed among them.
A meeting will be held in a couple-
of ,weeks and it is hoped at that time
to make more definite arrangements.
It was stated yesterday that the
roms would not be ready for occu-
pation until next fall.
OPERA AUTHDORDUE TO
RIVE HERE THURSDAY
EARL MOORE. PLEASED WITH
PROGRESS OF SONG
WRITING
Donal H. Haines, '09, author of the
book or the 1919 Union opera, is ex-
pected to arrive in Ann Arbor Thurs-
day. Mr. Haines vas to have been
here last Saturday but was detained
on account of illness. He will con-
sult with the opera officials and with
the cast tryouts.
One of Mr. Haines stories, "The
Duel," is in the February issue of
Everybody's magazine. Even while
in the University Donal Haines was
an author of considerable reputation,
and his later contributions to the
leading magazines have been numer-
ous.
Progress Pleases Earl Moore
Earl V. Moore, of the School of
Music, who has been in charge of the
music for the opera is exceedingly
pleased with the progress made by the
writers. Although A. J. Gornetsky,
'18L, is the only one of the writers
who has had previous experience
with Union productions, excellent
progress has been made. About 75
per cent of the pieces are finished and
the others are near completion.
The pleasing lyrics and music will
afford the cast and chorus fine op-
portunities ,for distinctive singing,
Mr. Moore asys. Among the selections
is a waltz that is, in the opinion of
the opera producers, a banner num-
ber. "The tunes are all catchy and
are sure to be successes," says Mr.
Moore.
Director Arrives in Two Weeks
The director, R Mortimer Schuter,
is coming in about two weeks to size
up his work and to make final ar-
rangements with the opera officials.
By that time there will have ,been a
cast tryout, so that the director may
have an opportunity to talk with the
prospective principals of the show.
Representative Elect Not Wanted
Washington, Jan. 27. - A bill de-
signed to prevent Victor Berger, of
Milwaukee, representative elect from
Wisconsin, from being seated as a
member of the house was introduced
today by Representative Clark of
Florida. Democrat, and referred to the
house judiciary committee. He was
recently convicted on the espionage

act.
Report British Take Railway
Amsterdam, Jan.- 27.-British forc-
es, according to a report received
here from Berlin today, have advanc-
ed from Baku and occupied the trans
Caucausin railway. The report adds
that the British also have occupied
Peprovsk and Astrakhan, at the mouth
of the Volga river.

SUPREME COUNCIL
TALKS OVER HUN
COLONY QUESTION
COUNCIL TALKS OF DISPOSITION
OF HUN COLONIES IN EAST
AND PACIFIC
DOMINION AND CHINA
DELEGATES HEARD
Financial and Economic Discussions
Important; Views on Private
and Maritime Laws Given
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 27. - The supreme
council at its meeting this morning
laid out a program of work, and the
constitution of the committees for
economic and financial questions.
Questions concerning private and
maritime laws also were discussed.
Exchange Views on Run Colonies
At the afternoon session the ex-
change of views on German colonies
in the Pacific and the far east were
continued. Representatis of the do-
minions and of China were heard.
Representatives of the powers with
special interests met at 3 o'clock this
aft ernoon at the French foreign of-
fice and appointed members of the
mission decided upon at the session
of the peace conference on Saturday.
Jules Camdon presided.
Financial Questions Discussed ,
The official statement:
"The President of the United
States, the prime ministers and for-
eign ministers of the Allied and Asso-
ciated powers and the Japanese rep-
resentatives met this morning at the
Quai d' Oisay, from 10:30 o'clock to
12:30 and beside a program of wor
and the constitution of new commit-
tees for economic and financial ques-
tions were discussed as well as ques-
tions relating to private and mari-
time laws.
Dominion Delegates Heard
The afternoon continued the ex-
change of views on the former Ger-
man colonies in the Pacific and far
east. The representatives of the do-
minions and China were heard.
The next meeting will take place
tomorrow at 11 o'clock.
ADELPHI SOCIETY
HAS FEATURE BILL
Peppy mandolin music, extemporan-
eous speeches, and readings by two of
the members will feature the meeting
of the Adelphi House of Representa-
tives at 7:30 o'clock tonight on the
fourth floor of University hall. This
is the last meeting of the semester.
and plans have been made by the com-
mittee ii charge for the finest pro-
gram of the year.
The Athena Literary society, the
women's debating organization has
been invited to attend in a body to
enjoy the special program. All other
persons on the campus who are inter-
ested in Michigan's platform activities
are urged to be present.
LIEUT. J. W. CU IINGS, '21,
RETURNS FOR NEXT SEMESTER
Lieut. Joseph W. Cummings, '21,
has returned to Ann Rrbor and will
resume his studies in the literary col-
lege next semester. Lieutenant Cum-
mings received his training at the

Officers' Training Camp held at Fort -
Sheridan last summer and was sent
to the University of Kansas, where he
had charge of a company of Section
B men of the S. A. T. C. At the time
of the signing of the armistice he had
been recommended for transfer to'the
10th division, then at Camp Funston.
Lieutenant Cummings is a' member of
the Chi Psi fraternity.

I

Students

Directory;

One Day Only

On Sale Thursday
Engineering Arch, Head of Campus

One Day Only

I

1

"Vfr

pole-U- Hall

Daily Office

Price, 50c

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