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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 26, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUND

ICIAL NE:WSPAPE┬▒R AT THE
rNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
hed every morning except Monday
the university year by the Board in
of Student Publications.

0-

ER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled
use for republication of all news dis-
credited to it or not otherwise credited
paper and also the local news pub-
herein.

I-

FIRST
CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Cor. State and William Sts.
10:30 A. M.
LLOYD C. DOUGLAS
Preaches on
"The Chalice of Courage"

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I FIRST METHODIST CHURCH

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First Baptist
Church
Huron Street below State

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Today

Engineers
BUY THEM NOW-- THAT SET OF
Drawing Instruments
$15.00, $18.00, $25.00, $28.00 THE SET
Some Bargains in Second-Hand Sets

tered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
igan, as second class matter,
scriptions by carrier or mail, $3.50. p
ices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
nes: Business, go; Editorial, 2414.
mmunications not to exceed loo words,
nMed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
es of events will be published in The
at the discretion of the Editor, if left
"mailed to tae office.j
signed communications will receive no
deration. No- manuscript will be re-
d unless the writer incloses postage.
e Daily does not necessarily endorse the
ments expressed in the communications.
nee L. Roeser.........Editor-in-Chief
-ed C. Mighell.........Managing Editor
ld Makinson..........Business Manager
ent H. Riordan...........News Editor
es R. Osius, Jr..............NCity Editor
uerite Clark ..............Night Edilxr
d B. Landis....... .Sport Editor
ha Guernsey........ .Women's Editor
K. Ehlbert............Associate Editor
n I. Davis ..............Literary Editor
and A. Gaines--.Advertising Manager
;s L. Abele......... Publication Manager
ild M. Major.......Circulation Manager
M. LeFevre...........Office Manager

6:30 P. M.
discusses the sbject
"Religion and Democracy"

ISSUE
Bernstein
Porter

EDITORS
Paul G. Weber
Phi.lip Ringer
I;; U. Flintermann

. REPORTERS
t Christie Berman Lustfield
lls Renaud. Sherwood
pel Henry O'Brien
rozier Mary D. Lane
BUSINFSS STAFF
Covell Robert E. McKean
Priehs, Tr. Clare W. Weir
Welsh Wm. A. Leitzinger
A. Cadwell Donnell R. Shoffner
Schoerger Henry Whiting II
NDAY, JANUARY 26, 1919. '
te Editor--Henry H. O'Brien
.T THE UNION TONIGHT"
day evening there will be an
dic smoker at the Michigan
The new building will be
i open to the first student func-

DORM POLICY UNCHANGED
NEWBERRY RESIDENCE STILL TO
ADMIT UNDERCLASS WOMEN
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
The Board of Governors of Newber-
ry Residence wishes to correct a
statement which was printed in The
Daily on Saturday, Jan. 25, concerning
a change of policy about to be adopt-
ed.
At a meeting held in Detroit on
Monday, Jan. 20, it was decided that
the choosing of residents be left whol-
ly in the hands of the social director.
The policy of having the underclass-
women predominate, remains un-
changed. Freshmen are to be admit-
ted for the year 1919-20 and already
several applications from girls who
expect to enter the University as
freshmen' in 1920-21 have been accept-
ed. A limited number of seniors and
juniors will be chosen each year, and
honor points, while being by no means
the basis for making the choice, will
be an important factor. There is not
now, and never has been, any thought
of Newberry Residence becoming a
dormitory for upperclass girls. To
avoid a possible tendency toward pro-
incialism and to secure a democrat-
ic and cosmopolitan group of girls, no
one city or ommunity will be allow-
ed an unfair oportion of representa-
tives.
The name "NewberryResidence" is
to be changed to "Helen Newberry
Residence," in order to identify more
closely the dormitory with the name
of the one for whom it is a memorial,
given by her children, and to avoid
any confusion with Newberry hall
which stands adjacent on the south.
Until incoming girls are made to
feel that the University has the right
to expect certain responsibilities yn
exchange for the opportunities and
privileges offered, the dormitory will
be regarded only as a 'place where
one has maximum creature comforts
at a minimum price.rThe Helen New-
berry Residence must stand for Mich-
igan ideals and campus activities if it
is to embody the spirit in which it was
given.
MABELLE L. DOUGLAS,
Secretary, Board of Governors.

10:30 o'clock
Sermon by Dr. Stalker
"The Owner?"
12 o'clock
Lynn Harold Hough
will speak to
Young Men's Clas
6:30 o'clock
Wesleyan Guild
Meeting
William Moerdyk
7:30 o'clock
Lynd Harold Hough
of
Northwestern University
I'

10:30
Public Worship
Sermon by
J. M. Wells
The Truth-Seeker"
11:50 to 12:40
Guild class
Subject: "What Is Christianity?"
6:30 P. M.
Guild Meeting, led by
Charles Chambers
week is as follows: Monday, seniors
and sophomores at 5 o'clock; Tues-
day, seniors and freshmen at 5;
Wednesday, juniors and sophomores
at 3 o'clock; Thursday, juniors and
freshmen at 5. Girls interested in
making the teams should come out
for practice regularly. Teams will
be chosen by Feb. 15.
The society of Michigan Dames will
meet in regular session in the red
room, Lane hall, Monday evening,
at 7:45.
U. K. Waulser, ex-19, Dies of Wounds
Word has just been received of the
death of Lieut. V. K. Maulser, ex-'19.
Lieutenant Maulser died in France
from wounds received in action. Soon
after the war was declared he enter-
ed the service, receiving his commis-
sion at the first officers' training
camp at Fort Sheridan. He was a
member of Sigma Alpha Epsilon fra-
ternity.
Daily want ads bring results.

Spiecial Sunday Dinner

12:15-1:30

Price 75c

Service Table d'Hote

Open to Men and Women

i

All girls taking required gymna-
sium work of any kind must take
posture examinations to complete
the work. These examinations will
be given Jan. 29, 30, 31, in the base-
ment of Barbour gymnasium. Ap-
pointments for examinations should
be made at once.
Girls are wanted to work upon
the hospital shirts received by the
War Work committee of the Wom-
en's league. Call Florence Field, '20,
chairman of the War Work commit-
tee, at phone 251.
The basketball schedule for the
Leave your films at
Quarry 's brug
Store
or at
71~3 E. U, Ave.
to be developed
SWAIN Does the ivork

WAH R'S

ITHE "Y" INN AT LANE HALL

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

P
SHEEHAN &CO
FIX UP THE OLD ROOM
EYE SHADES MAKE WORK EASIER
PENNANTS AND WALL BANNERS MAKE YOUR ROOM INVITING
Here's hoping you have a fine New Year.-Sheehan

q.

ft-

. i

Semi -Annual

1!

Clearance Sale!.

a new era at Mich-

I

20% Discount

An era in which the new building
State street will stand out as prom-
ntly in the minds of the three great
:tors in collegiate life-faculty, al-
mi, and students-as the building
Inds out to the eye of the visitor
Ann Arbor.
From the columns of The Daily,
>m the conversation of all who are,
erested in activities in the Univer-
U, everyone will hear "at the Mich-
int Union tonight."
The Michigan Union, the building
d organization that stands as a
lendid living monument to Michi-
n democracy.
SERVICE
Here's a fable.
There was once a man who wanted
help other people. He had studied
s fellowmen and decided that Service
ts the keystone of a happy life. He
id:
"I'll just wait till a chance comes
>ng, and then I'll do someone a
)rth while kindness."
There was once a man who liked his
llowmen. He was glad to be alive.
e whistled atrociously, always off
y. But he had a cheerful grin, and
happy word for everyone.
If he had a gloom or a grouch, he
ok it away to some place where he
dn't inflict it on his associates. And
s brethren said of him:
"He's the original little sunbeam.''
He'd never thought about service.
But he served, every day.

on Suits and Overcoats

Odd Trousers

III

I

'IDiamonds"
Diamonds are bought for a life-
time and their choosing should be
a matter of much discrimination.
Here you may select in safety--our
diamonds are accurately described
in every detail; they are of good
quality and sold at a modest profit

I

Wadhams & Co.
Main Street State Street

III

I

lpm-

wwwww.wo.-i
mmmmm

I

FOR LIBERTY

Why are you
so insistent?

Thirty-four women have been elect-
ed to the newi German National as-
sembly. Anyhow, they can't make a
worse mess of governing than their
male predecessors.
Two Kentucky ex-soldiers have
sworn out a warrant for W. Hohen-
zollern. They've got the right idea
anyhow.
Well, last night's game just makes
another score to settle.
P4'rshing's Decoration Carries Title
New York, Jan. 25. - - General
Pershing, commander-in-chief of the
American expeditionary for ces in
France, is listed in the 1919 edition
of the British "Who's Who" as
"General Sir John Joseph Persh-
ing, G. C. B." In August, 1918, King!
George decorated General Pershing
with the grand cross of the Order
of the Bath. A recipient of this hon-
or is entitled to prefix "sir" to his
name, but as General Pershing is an
American subject it was understood,
at the time that he would not use

The following casualties are report-
ed today by the commanding general
of the American Expeditionary Forc-
es: killed in action, 33; died of ac-
cident and other causes, 10; died of
disease, 60; wounded severely, 125.
Total, 228.
The total number of casualties to
date, including those reported below,
are as follows: killed in action, in-
cluding 381 at sea, 30,719; died of
wounds, 12,763; died of disease, 18,-
474; died from accident and other
causes, 2,595; wounded in action,
137,067; missing in action, 12,727.
Total to date, 214,345.
SENATE COMMITEE REPORTS
EDUCATORS AMONG PACIFISTS
Washington, Jan. 25. - Jane Ad-
dams, Scott Nearing, Eugene V.
Debs, Helen Phelps Stokes, and Dav-
id Starr Jordan are included in a
long list of pacifists which was pre-
pared for the United States senate
judiciary committee, now investigat-
ing pro-German propaganda in this
country. The list includes, besides
the name of David Starr Jordan, the
names of a large number of profes-
sors and former instructors in
American colleges. The intelligence
department reported that college and
university men, especially in the de-
partments of history, economics, and
sociology, were very active in the
propagation of dangerous and an-
archistic sentiments.
Princeton Enrollment Shows Increase
Princeton's enrollment this year to-
tals 1,116 undergraduates represent-
ing an increase of 272, or practically
30 per cent over last year's enroll-
ment of 844.
For service and results try a Daily
Rant Ad.-Adv.

Schlanderer
& Seyf ried
LIBERTY STREET

I

GO TO

The Mayer-Schairor

Company
112 S. Main St.

BECAUSE

Shorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping
Hamilton Business
College
Saeand William Sts.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbox and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:ro a.
., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to'9:48 p. m. 1(Ex.
presses, make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. m., and
every two hours to 9:05 p. m., 10:50 p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. in., 12:20 a. m.
r:io a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. nf., to
12:20 a. Mn.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

FOR

Besimers' Beefsteak Dinners

Fine Stationery
Engraved Cards
Die Stamping
Printing
Ruling
Book Binding
Leather Goods
Office Supplies
Filing Devices
Desks

III

are so hard to equal

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbo[ Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources.........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.

I

F RE-DDIE BESIMERS

0. D. MORR ILL
Typewriters
'typewriting
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Niokels Arcade Phene 1718
-iw.r sFoo

Chairs
Book Cases

113 W. Huron St.

i

V
.1 U

w

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