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January 26, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-26

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TIHE WEATHER
PROBABLY SNOW
FLURRIES TODAY

AJW AjKW
AlW

Iaitlj

PIRESS
DAY Adis -NI(UHT I
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 86.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 26, 1919.

PRICE THR

MICHIGAN BEATEN
BY NORTHWESTERN
AFTER HOT TUSSLE
DEFENSIVE PLAY IS STRONG
POINT ON EACH
TEAM
FINAL SCORE 17-16;
TIE AT END OF HALF
(arpus and Williams Bright Lights
for Michigan; Eison Back on
Purple Sqnad
(Special to The Daily)
Chicago, Jan. 25.- Michigan lost
t6 Northwestern by one point in a
Western Conference basketball game
at Evanston tonight. The final score
was 17 to 16.
The contest was one of the most
bitterly fought games played by a
Big Ten five this year.
Michigan played a great uphill
game in the first half, and succeeded
in tieing the score at the end of the
half, after Northwestern had seem-
ingly secured a safe lead.
The second half produced a re-
markable 20 minutessof defensive
play. Each side shot' one field]
goal and Northwestern made two
foul throws good to Michigan's one,
giving the Purple and White team the
leadi
Play Half for Seven Points
By this time the fierceness of the
contest grew to white heat, so much
so that the careful guarding resulted
in many held balls being called, one
after another, before the ball was free
on one side's possession for a pass.
Team work, brains, and sheer
weight were all utilized by both teams
during the second half. For 20 min-
utes the men battled for a score, and
when the referee blew his whistle,
Northwestern was out in front by one
point, obtaining four counters to the
Wolverines' three that half.
Karpus Star of Game
Karpus was one of the Michigan
stars in the game. He succeeded in
piling up three field goals and shoot-
ing six fouls out of a possible 11.
Williams was also one of the Maize
and Blue stars. He made one field
basket for the Wolverines. Weiss, the
crackerjack left forward, was sub-
stituted for Rychener. He was strong
on the defensive but was unable to
find his shooting eye.
Northwestern Strong Team
Marquardt, the Purple and White
captain, was one of the strongest
players on the Northwestern quin-
tet. He scored four field baskets.
Eilson, formerly a member of the
1918 Great Lakes football eleven,
played well in the team work for
Northwestern.
The Purple team showed a great
improvement, and the variety of game
played tonight puts her in the run-
ning for the Big Ten honors.
The summries:
Michigan, Pos. Northwestern
Rychener.....L.F.........Marquardt
Karpus . ...... R.F...........Wilcox
Cohn ............C.............Eilson
Williams ......L.G..........Ligarrie
Wilson ........ R.G...........Young
Substitutes: For Michigan-Weiss
for Rychener, Hewlett for Weiss.
Goals from field: Karpus, 3; Cohn,
1; Williams, 1; Marquardt,. 4; Eil-
son, 1; Young, 1. Goals from foul:
Karpus, 6 out of 11; Wilcox, 5 outof
11. Referee, Ray, of Illinois; um-
pire, Moore, of Loyola. Time of

halves, 20 minutes.
Former Student Returns from France
Capt. Ross L. Mahon, 12E, now
serving in France with the 91st unit
of engineers, expects to re urn to
this country very soon. 1aptain
Mahon saw active service in both the
battle of Argonne land that of S.
Mihiel. He received his lieutenan
at the first officers' training camp at
the Presidio, going overseas in June.
All senior literary students
are requested to report to Regis-
trar Arthur G. Hall all errors
occurring in the tentative list of
names now posted on the bullet-
in board in the north corridor of
University hall. The seniors are
asked to make corrections as
sAnn a nAihle

OLDEST PROFESSOR
TAKES VACATION
Prof. Isaac N. Demmon, of the de-
partment of English, will lease Tues-
day for Bradentown, Florida, where
he will spend a two months vaca-
tion. He was recently granted leave
by the University.
Professor Demmon, who came here
in 1872, has been a member of the
faculty longer than any other man
on the campus. He is the only Civil
War veteran on the present Univer-
sity faculty. During his leave, his
work will be taken care of by Prof.
Louis A. Strauss and Dr. William C.
Raymond.
Tickets Go Fast
For edic.Smoker
Practically a unanimous attend-
ance of faculty, internes, and stu-
dents is expected at the Medic smok-
er and buffet luncheon to be held
of the Michigan Union. More than
300 tickets have already been sold
and the little blue tags are still in
demand.
The smoker will start at 7:30 and
the program will commence at 7:50.
A student toastmaster will preside.
Talks by prominent faculty men and
students, with numbers by the medic
orchestra, will feature the program.
The reception committee has arrang-
ed for a system of identification tags,
and will see that everyone becomes
acquainted..
The following compose the commit-:
tee in charge of the arrangements:
Theophile Raphael, chairman, H. D.
Barnard, R. M. McKean, Leonard
Thalner, and M. F. Miner, all 1919
medics.
MANY FELLOWSHIPS
FOR WOMEN GRADS
University women who hold de-
grees are eligible to apply for the
various fellowships which are offer-
ed by the Association of Collegiate
Alumnae.
During the year of 1919 the follow-
ing fellowships are offered: Anna C
Brackett Memorial, $640; European,
$-500; Boston Alumnae, $500; Latin-
American, $500; Gamma Phi Beta
Soical Service, $500; Ecole Normale
Superieure De Sevres, offered by the
Minister of Public Instruction of the
French Government.
The Alice Freeman Palmer Memo-
rial Fellowship, $1,000, will be avail-
able for research in 1920-21.
All students wishing to apply for ap-
pointments to any of the University
Graduate Fellowships for 1919-20
should secure application blanks at
once, according to Alfred H. Lloyd,
dean of the Graduate School. Blanks
are obtainable at the office of the
Graduate School in University hall.
Applications should be handed in not
later than March 1, 1919.
Detailed information regarding fel-
iowships will be found on page 17 of
the Graduate School announcement.
NO MEN'S GLEE CLUB TO BE
YORMED UNTIL NEXT SEMESTER
. Mr. Harrison, of the University
School of Music, announces that it'
wil be impossible to organize . the
Men's Glee club before the second
semester. It has been impossible to
get word to the men this semester on
account of the unsettled conditions.
But he expects a splendid showing
next semester.

Scientific Film to Be Shown Here
The Women's league has secured a
film called "Beginnings of Life," which
has been prepared by Doctor Marlain
of Battle Creek sanitarium, and which
is being used by the state board of
health in its educational campaign on
venereal disease, will be shown free
to University and other women at
4:45 o'clock Monday, Jan. 27, at the
Arcade theater.
Gariield Stops Requisition of Coal
Washington, Jan. 23.-All orders
for the requisition of coal or coke
have been cancelled by the fuel ad-
ministration. Delivery on the orders
will cease Jan. 21:
Hobart Plans to Continue Canteen
Even though the S. A. T. C. at Ho-
bart college has been disbanded, it
is planned to establish a canteen in
connection with the college dining

CONFERENCE1 OFFER
SOURISE to REDS
Rolsheviki Opponents Will Refuse to
Attend Prince Island Meeting,
Says Russian
NOT RUSSIA BUT BOLSHEVIKI
WILL PROFIT BY CONFERENCE
(By Havas Agency)
Paris, Jan. 25.-The Russian bol-
shevik government at Moscow accord-
ing to information received by the so-
sialist newspaper l'Humanite is sur-
prised at the suggestion made by the
Allied and associated powers for a
conference between the Russian fac-
tions. The offer comes at a time when
the bolsheviki are victorious in the
field. The Bolsheviki officers do not
reject the principles of the confer-
ence.
Valdimair Bouitzess, a well known
Russian revolutionist in an article to
the Matin says the Russian parties op-
posed to the bolsheviki will positive-
ly refuse to attend the conference on
Prince's Islands because they look on
the bolshevik as traitors to the Fa-
therland and as murderers who have'
dishonored Russia.
Basile Maklakoff, the Russian am-
bassador to France, the article adds,
declares that .all Russians in Paris
feel deeply humiliated by the propos-
al from the Allied and the associat-
ed powers. The article adds that only
the bolsheviki will profit by such a
conference.
eery Character i
In .Fiction There
The Fancy Dress party held by the
Women's league last night in Bar-
bour gymnasium was a gathering of]
Mother Goose rhymes and every im-
aginable character of romance. Every
one of them was there from the
Cream of Wheat chef to the adver- .
tisement for "Fatimas."
Each of the sororities, league hous-
es, and dormitories was represented
by a group in the opening grand pro-
cession which was led by Cornelia
Clark, '21, in gypsy costume and by
Olive Smith, '21, in colonial garb.
After the procession and the stunts
the judges announced the prize win-"
ners. The prize for the cleverest
group was awarded to Cinderella,
and her haughty sisters and cour-
tiers, presented by the Caryatides.
Honorable mention was given' to the
Whole D-- family, the Tri Delts.
The cleverest individual proved to be
the Wounded Soldier in the Red Cross
group, Mrs. Ideson of the Homeopath-
ic Training school. The prettiest por-
trayal was that of Juanita Waite's.
She came as a Colonial Dame in Blue.
The prize for the ugliest was awarded
to Miss Rumses of the University
Hospital Training school, who came
as the bloodiest pirate that was ever
seen. The funniest character was the
Darky in the District School, in real
life Margaret Reynolds, '22M.
When it came to stunts, the fresh-r
men carried away the prize, with a
version of Red Riding Hood. The so-
phomores, who received honorable
mention, portrayed returned soldiers
attempting to take back from women
their old positions.

TWO CAMPUS POETS
IN NEW ANTHOLOGY
Two short poems by Michigan un-
dergraduates are reprinted in the
1917-1918 edition of "The Poets of the
Future," ,an anthology of college verse
compiled by Henry T.' Schnittkind
and published by the Stratford Com-
pany, Boston.
Michigan is represented in the lat-
est edition of the book by the short
,poem, "A Cavalier Song," by Gladys
Goshorn, '19, and by "An Episode of
the Persian Wars," by Lucille Quar-
ry, '18. Both of these poems were
published in The Inlander.
A new edition of this book is pub-
lished annually. It includes the best
and most promising work of Amer-
ica's young college poets as it ap-
pears in the campus literary publica-
tions, or as it is contributed by the
heads of the various rhetoric and
English departments.
*Z,7
No Leniency for
Campus Veterans
Examinations will be' no easier

CONFERENCE UNANIMOUSLY ADOPTI.
LEAGUE OF NATIONS PROJECT AFTUGN 0HS-gE
URGNT DDRSS ADEBy WII

during the approaching

season ofI

bluebooks because the S. A. T. C.
made study difficult this fall. Grades
will be determined exactly as in pre-
vious years with the. single excep-
tion that an instructor may at his
discretion give a former S. A .T. C.
or naval unit man the grade of
"dropped" instead of "E." This ac-
tion was adopted Dec. 2 and faculty
members will receive instructions to
that effect this wee..
thNo credit unless earned, will be the
motto governing the coming audit of
the instructors' books, according to
Registrar A. G. Hall. This will be
interpreted to mean that the man
who has made a determined effort to
catch up the work lost during the
military regime stands a chance of
saving his other credits and remain-
ing in school through Ahe "dropped"
grade; but he who has earned an
'"E" by neglect will have to take it.
Registrar Hall states that the ex-
tra week transferred from the second
semester to the end of the first was
expressly intended for the conven-
ience of army and navy men who are
making a sincere effort to save their
grades.
STUDENTS HEALTHY
BUT VACCINE AIDS
Only 20 new cases of influenza and
three of pneumonia have been record-
ed by the University Health service
since the opening of college on Jan.
7. The one death did not occur from
pneumonia, as reported, but was the
result of an acute attack of pleurisy.
Dr. W. H. Forsythe, the head of this
service, says that on the whole, health
conditions are good. He would not
venture an opinion as to whether the
warm weather had exerted a bene-
ficial influence.
While the pneumonia vaccine, dis-
tributed by thegovernment, has not
been tested to any great extent, it is
said to make one immune to many
types of the disease. It is adminis-
tered in the form of a hypodermic in-
jection; only one shot is given. Any
student may receive it by' applying at
the Health service.

BOARD'S DENIAL
The sensational story about
card playing in The Mich-
igan Daily offices, which has ap-
peared in some of the papers
of the state, has for its founda-
tion, only that three students
were involved in one game of
cards. No other card playing
has come to the attention of the
Board in Control of Student
Publications.
Signed,
E. R. SUNDERLAND,
Board Manager.
LOCAL DANCER SCORES
HIT IN POLISH CONCERT
SLAVIC ARTISTS PRESENT PRO-
GRAM OF MUSIC AND
DANCES
Characteristically Polish were all
of the numbers of the program given
last night in the High School audi-
torium by local and visiting talent,
under the auspices of the Cosmopoli-
ton club.
The most artistic parts of the pro-
gram were the dances executed by
Miss Jeanette Kruszka of Ann Arbor
and Miss Elsie Kouieczna, a pupil of
Pavlowa. The quality of Miss Krusz-
ka's work appears slightly better in
a comparison allowed through the,
similarity of the dances chosen by
the two artists. Most praiseworthy
in her dancing is its unusual expres-
siveness.
Miss Kouieczna displays an agility
and grace seldom found in so young
a dancers
Miss Kowalska Pleases
Miss Anna Kwalska's pleasing and
sweet soprano appears at its best in
a particularly brilliant passage in the
aria from "Halka." Her notes are
especially clear in the upper regis-
ter.
Miss F. Szulczewska rendered
Chopin's "Scherzo, B flat minor, O.
31" to the delight of the entire audi-
ence. Though the pianist fails to
color the mu'sic with her own per-
sonality, her technique is". beyond
fault.
Violinist Plays with Ease
Mr. Jan Szulczewski, violin vir-
tuoso; executed with unexpected ease
a very difficult selection.
The photographic slides of Polish
scenes shown at the beginning of the
performance rather taxed the pa-
tience of the audience. The speaker
delegated to explain the views either
forgot the majority of the descrip-
tions or relied too much on the im-
agination of his audience.
UNION ISSUES CALL FOR
MORE VAUDEVILLE TRYOUTS
Additional tryouts for the Spot-
light. Vaudeville, to be given by the
Union for the benefit of the Michigan
branch of the University union in
Paris, will be held at 7 o'clock Mon-
day evening at the old Union build-
ing.
Everyone who tried out last Wed-
nesday and all others who wish to
try out are urged by the committee to
be on hand.
While there were a large number
at the last tryout and much promis-
ing talent was shown, the committee

believes many more students are ca-
pable of producing acceptable acts.
Wisconsin Asks for'R. 0. T. C.
University of Wisconsin sent an ap-
plication to the war department at
Washington for an R. O. T. C. At
present only about 200 men are be-
ing drilled.
Purdue Drops Varsity Debates
No varsity debates will be held this
year at Purdue since the cancellation
of the annual Purdue, Michigan, Iowa
triangular debate.

NEW ASSOCIATION "EYE WI
NEVER SLUMBERS,"A-
SERTS WILSON
LEADERS REPRESENT
PEOPLE NOT NATI(
Draft of League Calls for Appoint
of 15 Representatives From
All Governments
BULLETIN
Paris, Jan. 25.-The conferenc
unanimously adopted the leagu
nations project. President Wilso
Colonel House are the American i
bers of the commission thereon.
The other delegates will be:
For Great Britian-Lord Rober
cil and General John Christian Sn
France-Leon Bourgeoise and
dinand Larnaude, dean of the fa
of law of the University of P
Italy, Premier Orlando and V
Scialoia; Japan-Viscount Chind
K. Ochiai.
OPEN TO ALL NATIONS
Paris, Jan. 25.-At the, peace
ference this afternoon the perm
chairman. M. Clemenceau, read a
olustion on the league of natio
the effect that such a league w
be organized for the purpose o
curing an international obligatior
safeguard against war.
The league would be an int
part of the peace treaty and wou
open to all civilized nations fav
its aims. The conference report
commission representing the asso
governments to elaborate a con:
tion for the league, including Its
rogatives.
The resolutions were adopted b
conference without change.
REAL SETTLEMENT NECES
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 25.-President W
addressed the second session O
full peace conference this after
on the subject of the league o
tions. , The President declared
the conference was under solemi
ligations to make a settlement
The present conference, Pres
Wilson added, should not comple
work until some further mach:
of settlement is set up.
"We are not here alone," the
ident said, "as representatives
governments; but, as representa
of peoples, and in the settlement
make we need to satisfy not the t
ions of governments, but the opil
of mankind."
Plain People Now Rule
The' President contended tha
league of nations must be a,'
thing and not casual pr occasi
It must have continuity.
"It should be the eye of the
tions, an eye which never slumb:
he declared.
On his travels, the President
people everywhere had greeted
league of nations as the first 1
in their interests.
"Select classes of men no longE
rect the affairs of the world,"
President said, "but the fortune
the world are now in the han
the plain people."
PERMANENT BODY URGEI
The preliminary draft of a re
tion looking to a creation of a le
of nations, adopted by the confe
says the league should have a per
ent organization to carry on the
ness between meetings of interna
(Continued on Page Six)
In order to discuss the poll
of the Union with regard

housing the campus societies
the new building, a represent
tive of each organization wi
meet at 5 o'lock Monday afte
noon on the third floor of ti
new Union.
One member of each socie
has -been notified of the confe
ference, and all are urged to 1
present. Further informatic
may may be secured from Doi
ald M. Springer, '19E, preside:
of the Union.

First Presbyterian Church
Huron and Division
Leonard A. Barrett, Minister
10:30 A. M.---Silences
6:30---Young People's Evening Service
Social Half-Hour Bginning at 6
Students Cordially Invited
WESLEYAN GUILD LECTURE
LYNN HAROLD ROUGH
Noted College Preacher and Professor in
Garrett Biblical Institute, Evanston, Illinois
t"The English Speaking People and the Future
of the World"
TONIGHT METHODIST CHURCH TONIGHT
7:30 F 7:30

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