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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 24, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDA

T 4r ffir i ait Daftg
OFFICIAL NE'WSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
wing the university year by the Board in
ontrol of Student Publicatyons.
LEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
the use for republication of all news dis-
atches credited to it or not otherwise credited
this -paper and also the local news pub-
shed herein.
Entered ,at the postofice at Ann Arbor,
ichigan, as becond class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or '"ail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words,
signled, the signature not necessarily to ap-
ar in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
tices ofhevents will be published in The
gaily at the discretion of the Editor, if left
or mailed to the office.-
Unsigned communications will receive no
nsideration.cNo nmanuscript will be re-
ired unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily dots not necessarily endorse the
ntirnents expressed in the communications.
ildred C. Mighell.........Managing Editor
arold Makinson..........Business Manager
incent H. Riordan............News Editor
harles R. Osius, Jr...........City Ed~tor
arguerite Clark..............Night Editr
mes C. J Martin.........elegraph Editu.
avid B. Landis.............sport Editor
artha Guernsey...........Women's Editor
:ark K. Ehlbert............ Associate Editor
elen . Davis..............Literary Editor
eGrand A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
gnes L. Ablele......... Publication Manager
onald M. Major......Circulation Manager
m. M. LeFevre ...........Office Manager

ISSUE
seph A. Bernstein
orace W. Porter
uth Dailey

EDITORS
Paul G. Weber
Philip Ringer
E. D. Flintermann

RIOIRTRS
r5aret Christie OT 1-erman Lustfield
ne Ellis Bowen Schumacher
na Apel' Henry O'Brien
rie Crozier Mary D. Lane
Renaud Sherwood

BUSINESS
ark B. C-.veil
.w.rd Priehs, Jr.
a R. Welsh
orge A. Cadwell
1 V. Schoerger

STAFF
Robert ]. McKean
/Clare W. Weir
Wmn. A. Leitzinger
Donnell R, Shoffner
Henry Whiting II

FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1919.
Issue Editor-Ruth Dailey
DOES IT PAY?
"Teaching is the most poorly paid
profession," is a well known state-
ment of fact and one that is becoming
nearly as well known is, "The Michi-
gan faculty is the iost poorly paid of
any university faculty." And the re-
sult of this is that Michigan has great
difficulty in getting and keeping men,
prominent in their respective fields,
on her faculty. The "big men" who
do stay are those who have become
so attached to the University that they
will not leave for a salary consider-
ation.
The fact that Michigan has lost sev-
eral of her best professors and is un-
able to get other men really capable
of taking their places is unquestion-
ably regrettable to all Michigan stu-
dents and alumni, and should be to
the people of the state of Michigan.
It lowers the standard of the Univer-
sity, for although the new men may
be nearily' a good, they are not widely
known' and hence their names on the
faculty list does not have the same
significance for outsiders as did the
men who were recognized authorities
fn their fields.
Michigan was formerly recgnized
in the East as the "leading Western
university," and in the West it was
classed wvith Yale and Harvard. Now
we are often referred to in the East
as "a pretty good school," "But, of
course," the speaker will add, "it
hasn't the prominent men on its fac-
ulty that some of the Western schools
have." And the former prestige of
Michigan in the West is also declin-
ing.
The state legislature has always
been doubtful about increasing the
University appropriation but in such
a case as this where the University
is f'n danger of being relegated to
second class, they should have no
hesitancy. There are thousands of
alumni throughout the state who
would give their hearty suport to any
action designed to raise or keep up
the standard of the University. And
the rest of the residents of the state
would have sufficient pride in the rep-
utation of their state university to
sanction the small additional appro-
priation necessary to increase the sal-
aries of its faculty.
WE HOPE SO, ANYWAY
Of all the- incongruities with pre-
vious life that the average college men
encountered in the army, two stood
out as prominently as society pins on
a campus celebrity. They were:
Baseball and punctuality.
It simply did not seem right to go to
a baseball game between enlisted men
at which an officer officiated. There
were no shouts of "kill the umpire."
It simply seemed impossible that when
the commanding officer said "seven
o'clock" he meant seven o'clock. Not.
seven fifteen, or twenty, or thirty, or
not at all, as one pleased.
Service is a thing of the past. "Pip-
ing times of Peace" are with us once

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Tonight at 8:0
"Ahletic Social"
Stunts Music Eats
Tomorrow, 7:3 P. M.
"Movies"
7 Reels
Pipe Organ and Singing
Students Welcome.
baseball was. Baiting the umpire
will qualify as at least an eighth of
the game.
But punctuality?
Shades of The Good Old Days, here's
hoping that every man who was in
the service will retain eternally as a
legacy from Uncle Sam the habit of
BEING ON TIME.
A fine imitation of buying tickets
to the "Follies" may be found in
standing in line waiting for the elec-
tion committee.
And again the little blue cards and
little blue books are coming in style.
The Directory is coming out-yet.
Junior Girls Play
to Run Only Once
One presentation only of the Junior
girls' play will be given this year,
contrary to the usual custom. Junior
girls have been given permission to
present the play at the Majestic thea-
ter, since the crowd expected cannot
be accommodated in Sarah Caswell
Angell hall. The play will be given
Wednesday night, April 2, directly
after the supper to be given by the
Women's league.
The former custom of giving the
play twice in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall, once for the benefit of the se-
niors, once for the alumni, was aban-
doned this year on account of con-
flict of dates.
RED CROSS ORGANIZATIONS MAY
ESTABLISH SCHOLARSHIPS HERE
Scholarships in the new public
health department of the University
will be established through the county
Red Cross organizations if the plans
of Sidney T. Miller, of Detroit, director
of the Michigan Red Cross, are suc-
cessful.
Letters have been sent to every
chapter of the Red Cross in the state
proposing that each individual chap-
ter raise funds to support a scholar-
ship. For the 17 weeks course, only
seven and one-half of which must be
spent here, the cost will be about $250
it is estimated.
Mr. Miller says that the experience
of the last few months with the epi-
demic has demonstrated the necessity
of the well trained nurse. It is sug-
gested that the local chapter select a
candidate from that community who
will be willing to undertake the course
if her expenses are paid.
All applicants must be graduate
nurses, registered, or senior students
at some recognized training school for
nurses.
STATE LEAGUE OF NURSING
HAS SIXTH ANNUAL MEETING

The sixth annual meeting of the
Michigan State League of Nursing
Education was held Wednesday in
Lane hall. The morning session was
given over to organization and a
business meeting was held.
At the afternoon meeting confer-
ences on child welfare, Red Cross,
University extension and affiliations
were held. Among the several speak-
ers was Miss Minnie H. Ahrens, di-
rector of the Red Cross nursing serv-
ice for the central division, which in-
cludes Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois,
Iowa, aned Nebraska. In the evening,
Major Reuben Peterson of the Uni-
versity hospital spoke on the depart-
ment of public health nursing.
A feature of the day's program was
an organ recital in Hill auditorium
by Earl V. Moore of the University
School of Music.

Y" Publication
.?l.eets Criticism
"The Red Triangle in Peace and
War" a recently published pamphlet is
the answer of the Army Y. M. C. A. to
the criticism which has arisen con-
cerning its operationof overseas can-
teens. The pamphlet states that the
primary policy of the "Y" was to give
free service and not free supplies.
Nevertheless, the "Y" the pamphlet
states, the "Y" has erected almost
2,000 huts, tents and various other
buildings to'serve as home, club and
church to the men, and free supplies
have been distributed to the value of
$1,400,000. Besides this, the soldiers
have been entertained with programs
by noted singers and actors and thous-
ands of dollars have been spent on
athletic equipment.
The charge that the army "Y" has
been profiteering by the operation of
canteens was investigated and found
false. A loss on the operation of can-
teens exclusive of the soldiers stores
in Great Britain amounting to $332,181
was announced the other day by E.
C. Carter, chief "Y" secretary in Paris.
"Bomb-proof" jobs for the army
"Y" workers was another point dis-
cussed in this pamphlet. This accu-
sation was answered by stati'stics.
Since the "Y" men went overseas with
the American Expeditionary Forces
nine of its workers have been killed
while on duty and "9 seriously wound-
ed.
In the Argonne fight seven hundred
"Y" secretaries were attached to the
different units, all of whom remained
in the war zone during the netire of-
fensive. In concluding, the pamphlet
says that "from the demonstrations
of the soldiers one would judge that
there is nothing but friendly feeling
for the Y. M. C. A."
r
ANNUAL LUNCHEON OF WOMEN'S
LEAGUE CHANGED TO DINNER
A supper will be given by the Wom-
en's league for all college girls and
visiting alumnae at 6 o'clock Wednes-
day night, April 2, at Barbour gym-
nasium.
It has been the custom in the past
to give a luncheon immediately pre-
ceding the afternoon performance of
the Junior Girls' play. This year
a supper will replace the luncheon,
since, there is to be but one present-
ation of the play and the meetings of
the Schoolmasters' club, to be held
here April 2, 3, 4, and 5, will occupy
the day time. The date was changed
from Saturday, April 5, owing to the
fact that spring vacation begins April
4.
Red Cross Call Nets 17 Million
Statistics show that as the result
of the recent Red Cross "roll call"
more than 17 million persons are now
membe sof that organization.
Dependable, Scientific, Drug lss
EYE
EXAMINATIONS
Phone 590 for appointment
Emil H Arnold
Optometrist 220 S. Pain St

Women
All girls taking required gymnas-
ium work of any kind must take pos-
ture examinations to complete the
work. These examinations will be giv-
en Jan. 29, 30, 31. Appointments
should be made at once.
Admision to the fancy dress party
will be 15 cents for spectators and 10
cents for those who come in costume.
Basketball teams will be chosen by
Feb. 15. Girls interested in making
the team should report regularly at
practices.
Victory Loan to
be Out in Spring
'Victory Liberty Loan" is the name
decided on by Secretary of the Treas-
ury Carter Glass for the fifth liberty
loan to be issued next spring. To
bring, the victors home and to finish
the work completely are the two ob-
jects. It is hoped by the authorities
that every patriotic citizen will either
begin or continue to save so that he
can buy bonds to the limit.
'16 MAN, ONLY ONE OF EIGHT
TO SURVIVE SHEL, RETURNS
Lieut. Robert J. Snider, '16M, is in
the U. S. Base hospital, No. 24, at
Pittsburgh, recovering from injuries
sustained at Cambrai, Oct. 3. He was
inactive in England for about a year
after enlisting and shortly after he
had been sent across to France, the
dugout in which he was stationed was
hit directly by a German shell and
all of the other seven occupants were
instantly killed.
The wounds which he sustained
were numerous but the one which is
keeping him in the hospital this long
is a severe laceration of the left chest
wall. After graduating here, Lieu-
tenant Snider was a member of the
medical staff at the University hos-
pital.
Bootleggers Given Heavy Fines
Six bootleggers paid fines of $200
apiece and costs, while one of them
was given a 20 day sentence, due to
police vigilance Tuesday and Wednes-
day. There were 434 quarts of whis-
key' taken in the two raids. The li-
quor, which was brought to the sher-
iff's office, will be sent to the Uni-
versity hospital for medicinal use.
Honorary Sororities Aid Underclasses
Honorary sororities att the Univer-
sity of Illinois are forming a personal
advisory system whereby undergrad-
uate women who are specializing in
certain subjects may profit from the
service of upperclass girls majoring
in that subject.

AHR'S

For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10, $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.
ASK US
Farmers & Mechanics Bank
101-105 S. Main 330 S. State St.
INickels Arcade)
TH E "Y" INN AT LANE HALL

Engineers

A

BUY THEM NOW- -THAT SET OF

Dra wing Instruments
$15.00, $18.009 $25.00, $28.00 THE SET
Some Bargains in Second-Hand Sets

Students!

Eat where you get the proper kind of food.
All home cooked food.

I

Lunch, 11:45-12:45 .
Dinner, 5:30-6:30 .
Lunch and Dinner, per week, $5.00

40c
50c

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

Service Table d'Hote

Open to Men and Women

;'

.SHE HAN & CO
FIX UP THE OLD ROOM
EYE SHADES MAKE WORK EASIER
PENNANTS AND WALL BANNERS MAKE YOUR ROOM INVITINO
Here's hoping you have a fine New Year. -Sheehan

1

Those who advertise in The Mich-
igan Daily cater to ALL Michigan
students.-Adv.
The Daily at your door every morn-
ing, $2.50 until June.-Adv.

Shorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping
Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.

i

i

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arboi and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:zo a.
m., and hourly to 9:1o p. m
Jackson Limited and Express Cars- 8:48
a. r., and every hour to 9:48 p. M. (EX-
presses make local stops wnest of Ann Arbor,)
Local Cars East Bound-6:oo a. n., and
every two hours to 9:os p. M.,1o:5o p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 1:45 p. im., 12:20 a. n.
1:1o a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti
Local Cars West Bound-- :48 a. m., to
12:20 a. M.

GO TO

Ths Mayer-Schairer

Company
112 S. Main St.

WvvAT KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. M.
Phone 1620-.

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

d

FOR

Fine Stationery
Engraved Cards
Die Stamping
Printing
Ruling
Book Binding
Leather Goods
Office Supplies
Filing Devices
Desks

-i

CO TO
T4e Eberbach & Son Co.
200.204 E. LIBERTY ST.

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Saving Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources .........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
0. D. MORRILL
Typewriters
Typewriting
Mimeographing

Rosenthal, '19, Given Discharge
Ensign Bernard Rosenthal, '19, has
just received his honorable discharge
from the navy. He left college last
June and enlisted as a seaman, at
Norfolk, Va. Later he received his
commission after traIning at Hamp-
ton Roads. Since that time he has
been one of the commanding oiZi-

FOR

Chairs

GOOD DRUGS
LABORATORY SUPPLIES
and
TOILET SPECIALTIES

Book Cases

cers on a submarine chaser in the At-
to what lantic fleet.

Has MOW04
Nickels Arcade
First Flo

l i

swing

I

I

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