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January 24, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-24

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IE WEATHER
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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DA V AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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No. 84.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1918.

PRICE THREE CENTS

IALS TEXPOSE
SHEVIKI PLANS
UNITED STATES

STEVENSON RECOMMENDS QUICk
DEPORTATION OF AGITATORS
AS REMEDY
RUSS REDS FINANCE
EXTENSIVE PROGRAM
Establish Centralized System of in-
dustrial Control, Advises New
South Wales Minister
BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)
Copenhagen, Jan. 23.-The bolshe-
vik forces are evacuating Petrograd
and removing all stores, according to
a dispatch to the Beriin Tagliche
Tidung from Helsingfors. The dis-
patch adds that Leon Trotzky, the
bolshevik minster of war, is trans-
ferring his b headquarters to Nizni
Novgerod, and that the anti-bolshevik'
movement is growing rapidly.
U. S. EXPOSES BOLSHEVISM
Washington, Jan. 23. - Testifying
before the senate committee investi-
gating German propaganda Archibald
Stevenson, of the military intelligence
committee,' said that representaties
of the Russian bolsheviki have al-
ready organized soviets in this coun-
try and that their plans contemplate
eventual seizure in this country.
]luns Start Propaganda 3
Mr. Stevenson also said evidence
exists that Germans in the United
States have begun a post-war propa-
ganda with a few of them exerting an
Influence which would make the peace;
terms imposed on Germany appear to
be less onerous. He called the con-
mittee's attention to a recent editorial
in a German paper published in. New
York which he said endeavored to
'convey the idea that American sold-'1
lers overseas had been regarding the
Germans in a light other than that
of enemies.I
Russian Reds Furnish Money
Leaders of the bolshevik movement
in this county, Mr. Stevenson testi-
fied, included John Reed, who he said
was the counsel general at New York
of the Russian soviet government, and!
Albert Rhys Williams, of New York.
Schools for the teaching of the bol-
shevik doctrines to civilians has been
established by the local organizations,
the witness said, and lectures have
been sent out. He told the commit-
tee that Hapgood, of New York, was
one of the lecturers, and that Leon-
ard D. Abbott, of New York, was head
of the school for the teaching of rad-!
icalism.
Money for the bolshevik propagan-
da work, Mr. Stevenson asserted, was
sent from Russia.
Urges Allen Deportations,
"The element that is furthering
radi'calism here is the same element
that is fighting American soldiers in
Russia," said the witness.
Asked by Senator Overman for a
remedy for bolshevism Mr. Stevenson
said he would recommend deportation
of alien agitators.
ENVOY OFFERS SOLUTION
New York, Jan. 23. - The world's
most effective weapon against bolshe-
vism is prompt and definite action
guaranteeing to labor a standard day,
a living wage, protection against un-
employment, and sane regulation of
child employment, is the opinion of
G. S. Beeby, minister of labor and in-
dustry for New South Wales. This was
made public tonight. His conclu-
sons are based upon an extended sur-
vey of the industrial conditions in the
United States and Australia.
U. S, Still Discusses 8-Hour Day

Mr. Beeby said he was impressed
by the absence of a cohesive policy
on the part of labor in the United
States, which he attributed in a de-
gree to the country's periodic indus-
trial unrest. America, he said, is
still discussing the eight-hour and
lidndred problems, long since gener-
ally recognized in England and her
more important colony. He said he
believed that a centralized system of
industrial control and adjustment of
disputs would entail government rec.
ognition of trade unions and collec,
tive bargaining, and woud put Amer

J-HOP WORK BEGUN;
TO BE FORMAL BALL
The J-Hop will be formal, according
to the definite decision of the junior
lits made at a meetings of their class
held yesterday afternoon in University
hall. T'ohe op comittee announced
thn, conracts are being sought and
Ihat work on the hop has begun in
earnc'3. Nothing definite has been de-
cided about fraternity house }parties.
It was announced that all dues
must be paid within a short time. A
place of collection for payments of
dues will be announced later.
The meeting had a small attendance
and the social committee will offer
an entertainment at the next meet-
ing which will be held after the second
semester commences.
FROS'HREMAIN ELIGI6BLE
FOR CAMPUS ACTIVITIES

(j)Mr'igEE CO1NCLI)ES
YEAR M'EN IIAY ACT

VIRST

The committee on eligibility has
made known that for the remainder
of the year freshmen may continue to
take part in campus activities.
Last fall the rule prohibiting fresh-
men and other first year students
from taking part in public activities
was suspended, under certain condi-
tions, but in order that the activities
concerned may not new be disorgan-
ized that suspension of the rule is
contin ned for the -second semester.
One of the conditions announced
was that the need for freshmen help

must in

each case be made clear.

With the relief afforded upper class-
men by the passing of the S.A.T.C.
and with the expected return of many
upper classmen from military and
naval service, it is likely that this
condition will restrict freshmen par-
ticipation more than it has during the
present semester.
"In administering the eligibility
rules," said Prof. W. I. Humphreys,
chairman. of the committee, "the com-
mittee will keep in mind the desire,
,haied equally by faculty and stu-
dents, that freshmen be. not unduly
rushed into campus affairs."
Professor Humphreys explained
that for this year at least the only
check on freshmen activities will be
the appearance of more able men in
the field. ,
MATERIAL FOR 1919 OPERA
NOW IN HANDS OF PRODUCERS
All three acts of the 1919 Opera
are now in the hands of the produc-
ers. Typewritten copies are beingj
made so that when the cast tryouts
assemble each one may be suppliedl
with a copy of the complete book.
Music writers under the direction
of Earle V. Moore of the University
School of Music are working on the
scores. Mr. . Moore says that good
progress is being made, andtthat with
a few alterations some of the pieces
will be practically finished.
S. A. T. C. TRENCHES FILLED IN;
BOAST HISTORY OF ONE FIGHT
Trenches which were used by the
S. A. T. C. for a sham battle on the
hills near the Observatory have been
filled in by the University building
and grounds department. The trench-
es which were dug by members of the
S. A. T. C. were constructed in zig-
zag fashion and made a realistic imi-
tation of the real article. They were
used for only one "battle."
Harry M. Carey, ex-'19, to Return
Harry M. Carey, ex-'19, who was. city
editor of he MichigAn Daily prior to
his snlistment in the aviation service,
will te"urn to the University the com-
ing se er He is at home in Port
Huron, naving obtained his release
from duty ecentiy.
The engineering eserve and
engineers of the signal corps
will meet at 12 o'clock today, er
Alumni Memorial hall to have
a Michiganensian picture taken.
All men who were in either of
the units should be there on,
time.

STATE COMITE
Committees to Consult with Faculty
to Make Plans to Improve
University
THEE CONFERENCES FOLLOW-
ED) IN PAST BY GOOD RESULTS
State legislature committees from
both the house and the senate arrived
in Ann Arbor last evening to make
their regular bi-yearly inspection of
the University, and to receive recom-
mendations for improvements and
changes from the University author-
ities.
To Go on Tour of Inspection
The committees will be shown
around the buildings this morning
and will then hold a consultation with
faculty members to decide ways of
bettering the University. No infor-
mation could be gained yesterday as
to what ideas for improvement will
be put forward at this time.
Any plans accepted by the commit-
tees will be brought up before the
state legislature for passage. In for-
mer years good results have resulted
from these consultations between rep-
resentatives of the University and
committees of the legislature.
Used to Make Gay Time of It
Up to a few years ago the whole
state legislature used to come to Ann
Arbor by special train and hold a ses.-
sion in University hall. The Glee club
would entertain the members of the
legislature, and the latter often join-
en in the 'songs. This custom had to
be abandoned when the legislature
grew too large.
The committee will lunch at the
new Union building with President
larry B. Hutchins and later in the
afternoon will return to Lansing.
ALL-SENIOR DANCE
TO HAVE FEATURES1
Features that are many and varied
are promised for the All-senior dance
which will be held Feb. 14 in the old
Union.The exact price will be an-
dance is an all-senior affair is in it-
self a feature, as in former years the
senior classes of the different col-
leges never intermingled except at
the class reception held during Com-
mencement week.
There will be novelty dances
throughout the evening and many
surprises are in store for the danc-
ers. Ike Fischer has promised music
by his best men and dancing will con-
tinue from 9 until 2 o'clock. The af-
fair will be informal.
A limited number of tickets will3
go on sale next week at the new
Union building. The fact that the
nounced later. Provision can be
made for only 100 couples and -that
number of tickets will be apportion-
ed among e t various colleges.
The following men have been ap-
pointed to manage the different work!
of the dance: E. M. Miller, '19E;, dec-,
orations; T. R. Jeffs, '19E, L. J. Car-
rigan, '19L, program; C. F. Boos, '19,!
Cort Bell, '19, entertainment;' C. M.
Norton, '19A, publicity.1
The next meeting of the dance com-
mittee will be held at 9:30 o'clock
Sunday morning in the old Union
building.
Prof. L. A. Strauss Called to Madison
Prof. L. A. Strauss of the English
department left yesterday for Madi-

ion, Wis., where he was called on
business for the University. He will
return to Ann Arbor on Monday.

SLIM CHANCE FoR
POLISH BOLSHEISM
Prof. F. W. Pawlowski Believes Poland
Offers Little Encouragement
for Movement
PEOPLE NATURALLY PEACEFUL
BUT LOOK TO ALLIES FOR AID
"There is not much chance of so-
called bolshevism in Polaid," was
the statement of Prof. Felix W. Paw-
lowski yesterday afternoon while dis-
cussing the necessity of sending Al-
lied envoys to Poland for the sake of
suppressing the threatened Bolshevik
movement.
Poland, fearing the results of bol-
shevik; propagandists, appealed to
the nations who are represented at
the peace conference for immediate
assistance. The supreme council of
the.peace conference decided to send
a commission, comprised of eight del-
egates, to Poland at once.
This is the statement made by Pro-
fessor Pawlowski when interviewed
regarding the Polish situation:
No Cause for Reaction
"If we consider the bolshevist
movement as a form of reaction evok-
ed by unbearable oppression or ex-
ploitation of one class by another,
or as a result of extreme social con-
trast in' the country, that is, extreme
poverty and excessive concentration of
the wealth of different classes, then
Poland offers much less ground for
such a movement than any other Eu-
ropean country.
"The present Polish government, at
the head of which are the most liberal
and progressive-midne men, is plan-
ning wide reforms which no doubt
-will make Poland, as it was during its
past history, one of the most pro
(Continued on Page Six)
DIRECTORY MAKES
DEBUT THURSDAY
The 1919 Student Directory will go
on sale next Thursday, Jan. 30.
Contrary to the usual custom the
Directory wil not be sold at
book stores. Students are urged Lo
buy it from the men who Will be sta-
tioned at different points on the cam-
pus to sell it. During the one day
only, someone will be on duty contin-
uously in University hall, at the eng-
ineering arch, and at the flagpole. It
may also be had at The Michigan
Daily office.
Two features of the Directory this'
year are the list of the faculty at
Ypsilanti Normal school, and a state-
ment of the location of such build-
ings as the University hospital and
the Museum.
Besides these three new points the
Directory will contain a list of the
faculty with their home and office ad-
dresses and telephone numbers; a
list of the campus organizations, the
Spublications, the campus societies,
and the sectional clubs. A complete
and revised list of all the students in
University and at Ypsilanti Normal
school. A memorandum of Ann Ar-
bor addresses with their respective
telephone numbers concludes the con-
tents of the Directory.
Spanish and French Replace English
French and Spanish are becming
the popular tongues of the din-
ing halls of the Grinnell college
woman's dormitory. At the present
time there are six tables seating 36

girls who speak French and 18 who
speak Spanish.

YOUNG POLISH STAR
TO AID IN CONCERT
Miss Anna Kowalska, rising young
soprano, of Detroit, member of the
Ganapol School of Musical Art, will
appear in the Polish concert to be giv-
en tomorrow night in the High
School auditorium.
Miss Kowalska made her debut in
grand opera last season, singing the
leading role of Halka in the opera
"Halka," by the most conspicuous of
Polish composers, Moniuszko. Two
years ago she won the endowment
membership of the Tuesday Musicale,
of Detroit.
Besides Miss Anna Kowalska, the
other Polish artists to appear in the
concert will be Miss Elsie Konieczna,
pupil of Pavlowa; Jan Szulczewski,
violin virtuoso; Miss Jeanette Krusz-
ka, ballet dancer, and Miss F. Szul-
czewski, pianist. All of the Polish
artists are rendering their services
gratuitiously.
OCHES TO DECIDE ON NEW
PROVISIONAL GSOVERNMENT

Parley
eign

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY
CONSTITUTION AT
ON FEB. 6

(By Associated Press)
Berlin, Jan. 22 (delayed).-The Ger-
man national assembly, which will
convene at Weimar, Feb. 6, is expected
to be in session about three months.
The first business before the assem-
bly will be the selection of a provi-
sional government because the pres-
ent government considers its exist-
ence at an end with the convening of
a constituent assembly.
The assembly will then take up the
adoption of a constitution. The pres-
ent government, as set, will not pre-
sent any proposal to the draft as
drawn up by the minstry, but will
merely submit it as a preliminary bas-
is for discussions.
Peace Question to Be Omitted
The obligatory task of the constit-
uent assembly will be finished with the
adoption of a constitution, but it has
the right to make of itself a consti-
tuted, instead of a constituting body,
and this probably will be done. In
that case the assembly will be oblig-
ed to regulate tasks and financial mat-
ters by legislation. The peace ques-
tion probably will not be considered
as it is not expected that the Ger-
mans will be admitted to the peace
conference before the adjournment of
the assembly.
Lodging Facilities Inadeqaute
The matters of lodging 3,000 per-
sons, who are expected to attend the
convention, is a serious one because
Weimar is a small city with limited
accommodations. The municipal au-
thorities there are considering the
question of billeting the delegates and
journalists with private families, if
necessary, and in adjacent cities. Tele-
graph, telephone and postal commu-
nication will be enlarged and train
service will be increased. Great prog-
ress has already been made in this
line.
The constituent assemblies of the
various German states probably will
not convene until after the national
assembly has completed its work.
WILL NOW BE HARD FOR COAL
AND LUMBER PRICES TO SINK
During the war real estate and
lumber prices started rising, and it
seems that they acquired such a mo-
nientum that now they cannot stop,-
or even slow down. For the present
market still holds to war prices, de-
spite the fact that the war ended two
months ago. Lumber dealers and own-
ers of real estate say that spring
prices show no decline, and in some
cases they are increasing.
LIT STUDENTS, NOTICE!
Election blanks for the second
semester in the literary college
must be filled out by all stu-
dents and handed in to the
Registrar's office today. The
committee on elections will hold
consultation from 3 to 5 o'clock
in University hall, and the class-
ification committee will meet at
5 o'clock in room 104, University
hall.

TO ADOPT
WEIMAR

-CONSIDER 4 HUGE
WORLD PR OBLEMS.
BOLESHEVIKI WIN BIG VICTORY
IN PARIS ASSERTS PRINCE
LYOFF
BRITISH SUPPORT WAR
COUNCIL'S DECISION

(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 23. - The ' supreme
council of the peace. congress today
considered international legislation on
labor, responsibilities and punish-
ments in connection with the war,
reparation for war damage, and the
international control of ports, water-
ways, and railways. The council then
took up consideration of the proce-
dure to be adopted regarding the ter-
ritorial question.
The text of the official announce-
ment reads:
"The President of the United
States, prime minsters and foreign
ministers of the Allied and associat-
ed powers, and the Japanese repre-
sentatives met this morning at the
Quai d'Orsay. The meeting proceed-
ed with the examination of the agen-
da for the plenary meeting of the
conferenc on Saturday. The follow-
ing questions were considered for this
purpose:
"First, international legislation on
labor.
''Second, responsibility and punish-
ments in connection with the war
"Third, reparation for war dam-
age.
"Fourth, international regime of
ports, waterways and railways.
"In addition the meeting began con-
sidIerations hof he procedure to be
'adoptedwith regard to territorial
questions.
"The supreme war council will meet
tomorrow morning at 10:30 o'clock.
Marshal Foch, Field Marshal Haig,
and General Diaz will be present, as
well as the military representatives,
at Versailles, of the Allied and asso-
ciated powers."
BOLSHEVIKI WIN VICTORY
Paris, Jan. 23.-Prince Lvoff, for-
mer Russian premier, in a statement
here strongly depreciated the decision
of the supreme council regarding
Russia.
"We never thought," said he,-"that
the conference would commence its
peace work by renewing relations
with tyrants.
"The Bolsheviki have won their
greatest victory in Paris.
"The decision of the council not
only is of danger to us but to the
whole world. It gits new impulse to
anarchy.
BRITISH FAVORS DECISIONS
(By British Wireless Service)
London, Jan. 23.-There is no rea-
son to suppose that this "wise and
high minded offer will be rejecte'd by
any Russian government," says the.
Daily News in commenting on the ac-
tion of the supreme inter-Allied war
council in asking representatives of
all Russian governments to meet del-
egates of the Allies and ,associated
powers in Princes Islands for dis-
cussion of the Russian question.
Islands Near Constantinople
(The Princes Islands are a cluster
of nine islands in the Sea of Mar-
mora, from 10 to 15 miles southeast
of Constantinople, and near the coast
of Asia Minor. The one nearest to
the Bosphorus is Prot, which is
about a mile in length; the next is
Antigone, of about the same size;
then comes Halki, nearly twice as
large, and Prinkipo, the largest of all,
lies still farther to the east.)
Counil'Offers Real Solution
"It affords them all a chance of es-
cape from a future full of menace,"
the paper adds. "It relieves them from
threats of foreign interference which
would have made fiercer class antag-
onisms and accentuated their material
miseries that have so long tormented
the hapless Russian people. But it

is not only Russia that President
Wilson has probably saved by this
resolution: It is the hope of the lea-
gue of nations."

Offer Relieves Threats of For.
Interference Claims Londlon
Daily News

WINE, WOMEN, SMOKES, AND PIE
THEY ALL RHYME TO GARGOYLE'S EYE

'Th time has come, The Daily said,
To write of many things,
Of tales and skits and would-be jokes,
Of which the Gargoyle sings.
But often in a minor key,.
For many jokes are sad,
And some are short and some are long
But all of them are bad.
Really, they aren't all bad. But
the Gargoyle itself knows from exper-
ience that lies are often necessary to
make rhyme. It's what you call path-
etic fallacy-no, not that-poetic lic-
ense.
The cover is among the ones that
arn.'tsoh ad. The vlIw and blue

color scheme shows a healthy amount
of Michigan spirit, and no one can
deny that talent was exhibited in the
drawing. The only trouble is that the
idea has already been used at least
once by every other known magazine.
Of course it's a great pity, but
there's nothing wrong at all with the
parodies, except the metre. That is
only a side issue and quite unessent-
ial in really good verse like this.
The Gargoyle seems to favor that
old saying, "Brevity is the soul of wit."
We do, too. All the short jokes are
good, the shorter the better. So, fol-
lowing our own adfice this will stop,
too.

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