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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 22, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNIESDkY, N

GNU,

.... -...,.. x

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday
during the university yeartby the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
yIEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is }exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and also the local news pub-
lished herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter.
Subscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
Phones: Business, g6o; Editorial, 24x4.
Communications not to exceed Soo words,
a signed, the signature not necessarily to ap-
pear in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
notices of events will be published in The
Daily at the discretioncof the Editor,.if left
at or mailed to the office.
Unsigned communications will receive no
consideration. No manuscript will be re-
turned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the
sentiments expressed in the communications.
Mildred C. Mighell.........Managing Editor
Harold Makinson.........Business Manager

sity itself. Last year the means em-
ployed to raise the Union's pledge
failed to obtain the full amount. The
need for the bureau is as great as
ever. To meet this demand a spot-
light vaudeville is planned for Feb.
28 and the tryouts are tonight. Every
bit of talent in the male student body
should be out for it and the audience
should resemble Convocation.
Then in a few weeks tryouts will
begin for the Michigan opera, one of
the biggest undertakings of the Uni-
versity year, with a national reputa-
tion as the college opera par excell-
ence. The spotlight vaudeville is, in
a sense, a grand tryout for the opera,
for most of the talent in college this
year has so far been hidden under a
fbushel.
Union activities give men a chance
to serve the University and themselv-
es, working with and for Michigan
men.
"An orderly crowd" burned a man
at the stake in Texas. Aren't the
Russian revolutionists an atrocious
set?

Vincent H. Riordan............News
Charles R. Osius, Jr............City
Marguerite Clark..............Night
Tames C. J Martin.........Telegraph
David B. Landis...........Sport
Martha Guernsey............Women's
Mark K.lbert............Associate
Helen I. Davis .............. Literary

Editor
Edito:
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

LeGrand A. Gaines.....Advertising Manager
Agnes L. Abele........Publication Manager
'Donald M. Major...... Circulation Manageri
Wm. M. LeFevre ...........Office Manager
ISSUE EDITORS
Joseph A. Bernstein Paul G. Weber
Horace ,W. Porter Philip Ringer
Ruth Dailey E. D. Flintermann
REPORTERS
Mararet Christie Herman Lustfield
Irene Ellis Bowen Schumacher
Edna Apel Henry O'Brien
Marie Crozier Mary D. Lane
Renaud Sherwood
BUSINESS STAFF
Mark B. Cvell Robert E. McKean
Edward Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir1
Eva' R. Welsh Wm. A. Leitzinger
George A. Cadwell Donnell R. Shoffner
Joel F. Schioerger Henry Whiting II1
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1919.
Issue Editor-Philip Ringer
BACK THE UNION
Under ordinary circumstances there
is no need for talking to Michigan
men of either the accomplishments or
the purposes of the Michigan Union
nor of the fact that it deserves un-
qualified, consistent, and hearty sup-
port from every man in the Univer-
sity. .But just now there are great
numbers of new men in school who
because of war conditions have not
been thoroughly grounded in the
course called "What Every Michigan
Man Knows." There is also a very
considerable group of men returning
from the service who are perhaps out
of touch with the Union of the present
day and possess only a hazy notion
of its history during the past two
years.
One of the illusions concerning the
Union which is prevalent among form-
er )3, A. T. C. men particularly is the
notion that the Union profited by its
government contract for the army
mess. The fact of the matter is that
thef Union is right now waiting to
find out whether the government will
reimburse the organization for money
expended, without which reimburse-
ment the Union has sutained a con-
siderable loss. The 47 cents a day per
man allowed by the government for
food was no more than was absolutely
necessary. The amount allowed for
the incidentals of help, equipment, and
fuel was below the actual expenditure.
That the Union mess was below army
standard was due to the fact that
army cooks, capable of providing meals
within the amount allowed, were serv-
ing with regular branches of the army.
The best mess possible under war con-
ditions of food prices and labor scar-
city was provided.
Another student hallucination fre-
quently observed is that the Union
with its outward evidences of a mag-
nificient new building and strong
organization must be remarkably rich,
an institution whose functions is prob-
aly to bestow benefits upon the stu-
dent without requiring anything more
than gratitude in return. On the con-
trary, the Union -has no great endow-
ment other than the enthusiasm and
good will of thousands of alumni and
students. Within the past five years
it has brought the audacious dream of
lovers of Michigan democracy to real-
ity, assuming as it did so, staggering
obligations which it will take time and
straining effort to fulfill. It is esti-
mated that the cost of running the
building will be at least $70,000 a year.
In spite of this burden, it has been
decided to complete the building by
fall. The Union, like most Michigan
products, doesn't start things it can't
finish; but in maintaining that spirit
is has assumed that Michigan stu-
dents and alumni are also imbued
with it.

Aside from the building, the Union
has pledged funds to support the Am-
erican University Union in Paris.
Other University institutions, among
them the publications, also pledged
support to this project; it is not an

The king market, which has
steadily declining of late, has
completely broken by Manuel.

been
been

If as many freshmen attend the frosh
frolic as are on the committee, it will
be a large party.
W±omen I
Organizations that wish to be rep-
resented as a group at the fancy dress
party, Saturday, Jan:25,rmust see
Cornelia Clark, '21, chairman of the
social committee of the Women's
league.

For girls interested in apparatus
work, a classwill be held from 4 to 5
o'clock this afternoon in Barbour
gymnasium.
810 SPORTSMANSHIP
COMMUNICATION SAYS ROOTERS
WERE POOR SPORTS AT FIRST
CONFERENCE GAME
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
Interdollegiate sports have been pro-
moted both here and at other uni-
versities for the purpose of develop-
ing a love of sports and a keen sense
of sportsmanship. The love}of sport
was demonstrated at the Michigan-
Indiana game, but the keen sense of
sportsmanship was not.
During the first half, Michigan led
most of the way. The crowd cheer-
ed frantically when a Michigan man
pulled off a spectacular play and ap-
plauded the visitors under like cir-
curhstances. In the second half with
the score reversed, the spectators' ap-
'plause for Indiana's good playing was
noticeably absent. That is comprehen-
sible; we all hate to lose, but the fact
that the rooters hooted the referee
(the best one, by the way, that has
officiated on the floor this year) for
calling fouls which beyond doubt
were committed, is absolutely inde-
fensible from the standpoint of a good
sport, who should take a beating with-
out whimpering, when administered
according to the rules of the game.
In the end Michigan came back, but
the victory, clean as it undoubtedly
was on the team's part, left a bitter
taste because of the unsportsmanlike
attitude of the Michigan rootera.
Can we afford to lay ourselves open'
to just criticism in this way? If we
can't, why not drop this attitude in
the future and be good sports whether
our team leads or not?
A MICHIGAN MAN.
A Pied'Galley
When you've been losing steadily
and it's steadily growing later as it
has a habit of doing these evenings-
and the poor wad who always forgets
to ante, decides to show his non-
chalance and good will by bleating
something which in its adolescent
stage of popularity sounds something
like this:
"Mary, Mary, you're ta da da da da.
But when I look into your roughish
eyes
Ta da da da da da Paradise
Mary, Mary, hum hum huh huh hum
Mary, Mary, ta de da da da
You're knock-kneed and you're lazy
You're cross-eyed and you're crazy
But you're MAY-REE ta da de da."

Well, wouldn't it make you long for
some stronger expression than "Good-
ness gracious?
Judging from his pen, I would say
Lieutenant Libonati was well liked by
his men. But not so soon, Lieuten-
ant - I'm still recovering
from the mess hall. R. E. G.
Simplejohn's Spring Song
I wisht I wuz a little rock
A settin' on a hill;
'N doin' nuthin' all day long
'Cept jes' a settin' still.
I wouldn't eat, I wouldn't sleep!
I wouldn't even wash!
Id set 'n set a thousand years
'N rest myself, by gosh!
C. A. M.
New additions have been made to
the chemistry laboratories at the Uni-
versity of Chicago. Improvements
have been made on the old labora-
tories until there is now room erough
to accommodate over 300 students at
one time.
Phone. 2700
At your service day and night
Price 25c
Special rates on parties, etc.
INDEPENDENT TAXI CO.

7r
For Traveling Anywhere Anytime
You will enjoy using the
A. B. A. Travelers' Checks as issued by this bank. They
come in denominations of $10 $20, $50 and $100, are cashed
by Banks, Hotels, Railroads, etc., without identification.

.. e

Engineers

BUY THEM NOW - - THAT SET OF

Drawing Instruments
$15.00, $18.00, $25.00, $28.00 THE SET
Some Bargains in Second-Hand Sets

WAH R'S

U NIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

ASK US

Farmers &
201-105 S. Miain

Mechanics Bank
330 S. State St.
(Nickels Arcade)

THE "Y" INN AT LANE HAL L

Students!

Eat where you get the proper kind of food.
All home cooked food.

Senior women will have
ant meeting at 7 o'clock
Martha Cook building.

an import-
tonight in

--

I

I

For Influenza Cases

Lunch, 11:45-12:45 . . .
Dinner, 5:30-6:30 . . .
Lunch and Dinner, per week, $5.06

40c
50c

A cabinet meeting of the Y. W. C. A.
will be held at 3:30 o'clock this aft-
ernoon in Barbour gymnasium.
Dean Myra B. Jordan will entertain
the social committee of freshman girls
Wednesday at luncheon.

of

Service Table d'Hote

Open to Men and Women

Falling Hair
Try
Burnhiam' s
Hot Oil Shampoo
Treatmentswith this since the recent
epedemic have been very successful

SHEEHAN &CO

The class in play ground work
meet at 1 o'clock this afternoon.
members of the class should come;
pared to teach.

will
All
pre-

FIX UP THE OLD ROOM
EYE SHADES MAKE WORK EASIE
PENNANTS AND WALL BANNERS MAKE YOUR ROOM INVITING

The board of directors' of the Wom-1
en's league will entertain the advis-
ory board, with a tea given at the
home of Cornelia Clark, '21, 907 Lin-
coln avenue from 4 to°6 o'clock. Chair-
men of league committees are f urged
to be present.

Mrs. T. L.
!O N. University

Stoddard
Phone 2652

Here's hoping you have a fine New Year. -Sheehan

--A

Es

1°"

-u

U

oft

I. ii

CO TO

IShorthand
Typewriting
Bookkeeping

SPEAKING

OF INSURANCE

I

The Eberbach & Son Co.
200.204 E. LIBERTY ST.

The best insurance is the insurance that you
will be healthy and live long.
Why not tack on a few years by eating at
the CAFETERIA where you can select food
adapted to your needs from a great variety
properly prepared from the best material.

FOR

GOOD DRUGS

1!

LABORATORY SUPPLIES

mmwmm

U

and

6

TOILET SPECIALTIES

The reason we do such beautiful

mmm

A

2

Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time).
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:ro a.
in., and hourly to 9::o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8 :48
a. in., and every hour -to 9:48 p. in.(EX-
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound- 6:oo a. in., and
every two hours to 9:os p. im., xo05o p. m.
To Ypsilanti only, 1 4 P. in., r2:20 a. m.
i :to a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :48 a.' n.to
12:2o a.in. 4
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-B

work is because we use

i

00000

Oa, - K4

Calkins
Drug
Co.

Have You

Learned

314 s. State St.

Ann Arbor

Exclusively in our Dry
Cleaning

that the satisfadtory place to get
your Kodak finishing done is
here?
More people are learning it

"vMe )Come of 8nergine"

every

day.

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capitaland Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources .........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707" North University Ave.
O D. MORRILL
Typewriters ~
Typewriting -
Mimeographing
Has moved to
Nickels Aroade Phone 1718
First Floor

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing

324 s0. STATE STREET
1123 SO. UNIVERSITY AVE.
711 PACKARD STREET

PHONE 2508

209 S. 4th AVE.

i

of the Tnion, but the liniver-I

I

a ..wxe+ er Y. M

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