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January 22, 1919 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-22

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f

THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PROBABLY
RAIN

Sir itwn

~1Iatx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DA's AN) NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. $2.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1919.

.*

PRICE THREE CENTS

DANISH MINIS TEH
TELLS ENOYS OF
RUSS CONDITIONS:
WORLD LEADERS MAKE RAPID
PROGRESS TOWARD END
OF PROBLEM
DELEGATES TO HOLD
TNEXT SESSION TODAY
Peace Congress Expect to Formulate
Concrete Proposal on
Question Soon
(By Associated Press)
Paris,. Jan. 21.--The official state-
ment regarding the supreme council's
proceedings today reads:
"The President of the United States,
the private ministers and foreign min-
isters of the Allied powers, assisted
by the Japanese representative, met
today at the Quay d'Orsay from 10:301
o'clock until 12:45 o'clock in the
morning, and, in the afternoon, from
3 to 5 o'clock.
'In the morning M. Scavenius, Dan-
ish minster to Russia, gave all the
information at his disposal on the va-
rious parties in Russia.
"In the afternoon the discussion of
this question was continued. A great
deal of progress toward an agreement
was made and it is hoped to formu-
late a concrete proposal on this ques-
tion tomorrow. The question of the,
procedure of the conference was then
discussed.
"The next meeting will take place
at 11 o'clock tomorrow morning."
22 Lits Favor
Fros h Frolic
That a frosh frolic will be held
this year was the decision of the
freshman literary class at the first
meeting held yepterday afternoon in
University hall. In opening the meet-
ing, President Frank Steketee thank-
ed the class for their confidence . in
him as leader. He expressed hope that
hereafter the class would attend meet-
ings as well as he knew they would
the coming social gatherings.
Matthew Lamport was appointed
chairman of a committee to arrange
a frosh frolic and mixer. The com-
mittee are: Hilda Bowen, Harriet
Dewey, Barbara Duncan, Norma Jud-
son, Beatrice Mason, Caroline Napier,
Louilla Paul, Marian Pearson, Elise
Smith, Laura Snyder, Bertral Sum-
mers, Alethea Yerkes, James Brucker,
Bowen Schumacher, Herbert Loeb,
James Crosby, Gordon Loud, Wilmer
Hoge, John Winters.
It was decided that class dues
should be 25 cents.
Dean John R. Effinger addressed the
meeting, telling the class the duties
of freshmen and what is expected of
them. He emphasized the democracy of
the University, saying that Michigan
residents constituted little over one-
half the total enrolliuent, the rest
coming chiefly from the middle-west
states.
00 WOMEN REGISTER FOR
PRIMARIES NEXT SPRING
About 300 women have registered
to vote at the spring primaries and

the county clerk believes that many
more will register in the near future.
It is believed that the women are
anxious to vote on the beer and light
wine question which no doubt will
be an important issue in the coming
election.
Purdue Students Serve Faiculty Lunch
Every Wednesday the home econ-
omics department at Purdue serves
lunch to members of the faculty and
student body as a practical applica-
tion of that course of study. .
LIT STUDENTS! NOTICE!
Election blanks for Athe see-,
ond semester in the literary col-
lege must be filled . out by all
students and handed in to the
Registrar's office Thursday or
Friday of this week.

RUSSIANDANCER
TO APPEAR HERE
With the reputation of being the
only ballet dancer to execute the
"Golden Butterfly" to the satisfaction
of Joslyn Gibbons, noted dance au-
thority with Serge de Diagileff Ballet
Russe, Miss Jeanette Kruszka will ap-
pear in the Polish concert Saturday
night in the Ann Arbor High School
auditorium.
Miss Kruszka, who is a pupil of
the Chicago Grand Opera Ballet
school, will present a Paderewski
ballet and Scharwenka's dance.
On her initial showing in Milwau-
kee Miss Kruszka scored her greatest
hit in the rendering of the "Golden
Butterfly." The theater in which khe
played offered her immediate book-
ing. Her graceful and attractive pre-
sentation of "The Beauty of the
Alps" a few days later before the S-
cial Culture club of Milwaukee sub-
stantiated her reputation as a ballet
'dancer.
Aspiring Actors
Hark Ye to This!
Houdini, the Magnificent Magician.
Weber and Fields, in Classy Comics.
Midnight Sons Quartette, Michi-
gan's Best at Their Best.
Al Jolson, Chirping Some New Piec-
es in the Same Old Way.
Will Rogers, of the Follies, Mer-
chandising in Monologues.
Fred Stone and Flora Zell, Dancing
Dolls.
Julian Eltinge, a Perfect Lady.
Six Brown Brothers, Jazzers Jex-
traordinary.
Zunelli Trio, Australian Aerial
Acrobats.
This array of star performers will
not appear at the Spotlight Vaudeville
on Feb. 28, but there'll be many
worthy imitators of them if the men
who are to try out at 7:30 o'clock
this evening in the old Union building
live up to expectations.
As the Spotlight Vaudeville has for
its purpose the raising of $1,000 for
the benefit of the American Univer-
sity union in Paris, the best, talent
of the campus is expected to put in
an appearance tonight. President
Harry B. Hutchins -is sponsoring the
show, which is to prove that Michi-
gan men over here are not delin-
quent in their duty to Michigan men
overseas.
Added to these factors is the con-
sideration that all successful try-'
outs for the Spotlight Vaudeville will
be given due credit when the cast and
chorus calls for the Union opera are
issued.
Dlarbers Hone and
Strop and Mloan
The old-clothes men of Ann Arbor
are not the only ones who are ex-
periencing the after-effects of war.
State street tonsorial artists complain
that never before have they consum-
ed so much valuable time in sharp-
ening and honing the implements of
their profession.
Whether the deplorable condition
of these instruments is caused by
coal dust which settles in the hair
or by the inerradicable sandy grit ac-
quired by the S. A. T. C. man, no one
seems to know.
One of the most prominent of the
barbers admits that it is possible that
the much-advertised "army style"

hair cut might be responsible. One
can easily imagine that the wiry type
of hair thus produced might be es-
pecially' hard on keen-edged razors
and scissors.
ADDITIONAL TIME TO FINISH
REQUIRED SUBJECTS GRANTED
Extension of time for the comple-
tion of subjects required for gradua-
tion will be granted all former mem-
bers of the S. A. T. C. and University
naval unit who were unable to elect
such subjects this semester.
Au required subjects are supposed
to be completed by the end of the
junior year but in this and certain ex-
ceptional cases students may make up
such defeciencies in his senior year.
This same rule applies to the group
elective subjects. Students entering
the University may have the same
privilege upon application to the advis-
ory committee.

ALL LITS 'MUST FILL
OUT ELECTION BLANKS
NEW REGISTRATION SET FOR
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
THIS WEEK
Election blanks for the second se-
mester in the literary college must
be filled out by all students and hand-
ed in to Registrar Arthur G. Hall
Thursday or Friday of this week. Aft-
er 5 o'clock of the latter day, a pen-
alty of $1 is imposed.
In the case of freshmen, it is re-
quired that they elect for the second
semester, courses continuing those
taken during the first semester, and
in the same sections. Each freshman
must make out an election blank' with
a card for each course. The blanks
may be obtained from the regis-
trar's office.
Must Continue Courses
Freshman who are unable to make
elections In accordance with the
above rule, because of irregular elec-
tions permitted the first semester,
should consult the committee on elec-
tions in the registrar's office from
3 to 5 o'clock, Jan. 21 to 24: Unavoid-
able changes in election may be made
only in consultation with the same
committee from 3 to 5 o'clock, Feb.
18 to 21.
A supplementary circular stating
the importait changes made in the
courses of the literary college since
the issuance of the last University
bulletin, has been printed and copies
of :uch are now available at th reg-
istrar's office.
New Circular Issued
Minor changes have been made in
practically every department in the
literary college, and except for the va-
riations mentioned in the circular, all
courses will be given during the see-
ond semester as described in the an-
nouncement issued last September.
The return of the University o the
semester plan necessitated the many
changes and the publication of this
supplement.
l
FAMOUS GRADUATE
DIES AT CORNELL
Ithaca, N. Y., Jan. 20.-Prof. Rolla
Clinton Carpenter, professor ,of ex-
perimental engineering of Cornell
university, a graduate of Michigan
'and a former resident of Orion,
Mich., died here today of a chronic
aildient. He was the brother of
Judge W. L. Carpenter, of hetroit.
Professor Carpenter graduated
from Michigan in 1875, and took the
degree of master of mechanical en-
gineering at Cornell in 1888. He was
assistant professor of experimental
engineering in the eastern college un-
til 1895, when he was elected to full
professorship.
He was the author of many text
books on engineering and held mem-
berships in eight leading engineering
societies of America. He was at va-
rious times president of the Ameri-
can society of heating and ventilat-
ing engineers, and vice-president of
two.
Professor Carpenter was one of the
leading patent experts of America
and was a member of the commission
appointed by the Academy of Science
in 1915 at the request of President
Wilson, to investigate the Panama
Canal slides.
GRADUATE APPOINTED OFFICIAL
INTERPRETER AT PEACE MEET

Lieut. Walter T. Pierce, who receiv-
ed his master of arts degree in this
University, has been appointed official
interpreter at the peace conference in
Paris, representing the United States.
Lieutenant Pierce has been in France
for some time as head of the translat-
ing, editing, and interpreting depart.
inent of the American forces, and has
recently received a written apprecia-
tion from his colonel for bI excellent
work.
Lieutenant Pierce also studied at
the Ohio Wesleyan and Johns Hopkins
universities. He was given a chair in
Yale for two years, resigning to ac-
cept a chair at Ohio State university.
He was an instructor in French at
Ohio State, and still holds the posi-
tion having been granted a leave of
absence to enter the service.
University of Toronto is a trongly
opposed to compulsory military train-
dng and drill is not encouraged.

SENATE ORDERS PROBE
OF NEWBERRY BALLOT

SENATORS KNOX AND
CLAIM COMMITTEE'S
ILLEGAL

KELLOGG
ACTION

Washington, Jan. 21.-In the Ford-
Newberry Michigan senatorial elec-
tion contest, the senate privileges
and elections committee ordered a
thorough report on Chairman Pomo-
rene's motion, authorizing an imme-
diate investigation and measures to
take possession of the ballot. All
Democrats present, and Senator Ken-
yon, Republican, supported the reso-
lution.
Senator Knox, of Pennsylvania, and
Kellogg, of Minnesota, 'Republican,
sprotested against the committee's ac-
tion, declaring it illegal.
Senator King, of Utah, Democrat,
said he would oppose immediate hear-
ings of the committee unless it was
clearly demonstrated that valuable
evidence would otherwise be lost. He
agreed with Senators Knox and Kel-
logg that the present senate was not
authorized to settle the contest and
that the matter should go over for dis-
position by the next senate.
In joining the Democrats, Senator
Kenyon said he had always favored
prompt investigation of 'the Michigan
contest in the interests of security of
senatorial elections.
U. S. RECEIVES
BOLSHEVIKI NOTE
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 21.-American rep-
resentatives at the peace cofnerence, it
was said today at the state department
have received the note from the Bol-
shevik foreign minister, who proposed
that the United States fix a date and
place for a conference between Soviet
representatives and American ambas-
sadors to discuss the withdrawal of
American troops from Russia.
The note was forwarded promptly to
Paris after its receipt at the state de-
partment so that it could be consider-
ed along with other aspects of the
Russian situation.
GERMAN ASSEMBLY
MEETS AT WERMAR
(By Associated Press)
Copenhagen, Jan. 21.-The German
national assembly will meet at Wer-
mar, capital of the grand duchess of
Saxe-Wermar-Eisenbach, according to
the Berlin Lokal Anzeiger.
This was decided upon at a meeting
between the German government rep-
resentatives and the Prussian minis-
tery after they had agreed that the
session ought to be held in an non-
Prussian town.
Sigma Phi Epsilon to Have New House
Plans are now being carried out for
-the Sigma Phi Epsilon to move into
the old Sheehan house on Huron
.street. About $800 worth of furniture
waslost inuthe fire which destroyed
the fraternity house on the corner of
State and Monroe two weeks ago. A
good deal was still in storage at that
time, and will now be used in their
new quarters, but quite a lot of new
-furniture is still to be purchased.
Small Fire Damages Tappan School
The value of fire drill in the schools
was demonstrated Tuesday morning
when a small blaze broke out in the
basement of Tappan grammar school
and 400 children marched to safety
in the school yard within a few min-
utes after the fire was discovered.
The fire was quickly extinguished
by the use of chemicals and caused
little damage.
w
Fireman Mciaren Recovers from Fall
Fireman William McLaren, who was

injured by a falling floor in the Sigma
Phi Epsilon fire recently, was dis-
charged from the St. Joseph's sanitar-
ium Sunday. He has been in the san-
itarium for the past ten days having
sprained his neck legiments in the fall,
but is returning to work fully recov-
ered.
1,273 Enroll at Oberlin College
Enrollment at Oberlin up to Jan.
13 totals 1,273. Of those, 267 are men
and 688 are women. There are 22
men and five women enrolled in the
school of theology.

MASS MEET PUT
OFF INDEFINITELY
Inability to obtain rapid-fire alum-
ni speakers for the pep mass meeting
Friday night, because of business en-
gagements ortmilitary duties, caused
the meeting to be postponed indefi-
nitely.
Though a mass meeting would aid
in bringing back the former Michigan
spirit, the date set was too near the
close of the semester to arouse much
enthusiasm. It was decided that the
meeting would be more appropriate
next semester when former students
will return.
The band, which is always a big
fight producer, is now in the process
of reorganization, due to the fact that
many of the S. A. T. C. and naval
men have left, and will be in excel-
lent shape by the beginning of the
second semester.
Gargoyle Stars
Edythe and Reg
The Gargoyle is out today.
Many of the leading features have
already been announced in The
Daily-the cover, the frontispiece, the
double page drawing and various other
features. There is, however, one fea-
ture about which little has been
said. The Gargoyle will contain more
of the "Dear Edythe" and "Dear
Reg" letters.
In the opinon of one kindly critic
of the student publications, Reg and
Edythe will be remembered longer
than any other personalities that have
appeared in this year's Gargoyles.
"Reg," said he, "is already one of the
best known men upon the Campus.
It is the peculiarity of fictitious char-
acters that when they are at all real,
they are realler than the people that
we continually see upon the streets.
Reg has this sort of reality-we know
him as we do not know most of the
students we meet.
"The same sort of thing may be said
of Edythe. In fact it is hard to be-
lieve that she is a mere fiction. You
cannot tell me that the letter begin-
ning 'Really, Reg, I'm a dead rabbit,'
is mere invention. There surelymust
be a real feather brained girl back
home somewhere that wrote that."
And the kindly critic shook his
head gravely and took up * more se-
rious subject.
Honorary Society
,Admits Ten '20's
Again the sidewalk under the En-
gineering arch has been scrubbed and
the Triangle made clean to the tune
of the swishing paddle. Ten tried and
true junior engineers were selected
for the arduous work and surviving
the ordeal were admitted to Triangles,
junior engineer honorary society.
The neophytes were: Waldo Har-
vert, Clayton Schoemaker, Hobart
Cliff, James Darbaker, Joseph Tracy,
Wiliam Fraser, Waldo Pfchaeche,
Kershaw Harmns, Harlan Walker, and
Franz Schwalde.
IRISH DECLARE
INDEPENDENCE
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, Jan. 21.-The Sinn-Fein as-
sembly met this afternoon in the Man-
sion house.
The assembly stood while the decla-

ration of independence was read, an-
nouncing the establishment of an
Irish republic and demanding the evac-
uation of Ireland by the British gov-
ernment.
The first business of the assembly
was the election of a chairman, after
which prayers were said by Father
O'Flannery. The declaration of inde-
pendence was then read.
BUSINESS ENGLISH COURSES
FOR NEW SEMESTER ANNOUNCED
The courses in business English
for next semester have been announc-
ed. Business English 9, consisting of
advertising and commercial corre-
spondence, will present two hours.
Lectures will be given by Mr. Thorn-
ton at 4 o'clock on Thursday in room
4, old Engineering building. Recita-
tion periods will be arranged later.
Business English 10, a course in
sales, will be omitted next semester.

INDISPEN SIBLEP
SAYS LCHNOWSKY
FORMER ENVOY FLAYS WORLD
LEAGUE WITH ROOTS IN
STATUTFRS
JUSTICE PERMITS NO
FINANCIAL BURDENS
HunBelieves Czechs Possess No Right
To Mixed Teutonic Speaking ,
Territories
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, Jan. 21.-Prince Lichnowsky
former German ambassador .to Eng-
land, today gave the following state-,
ment to the.Associated Press:
"A peace of right and justice, pro-
vided it is meant merely to be phrase
behind which a peace of violence con-
ceals itself, can only be such a peace
as neither enslaves nor mutilates the
conquered, which leaves him the pos-
sibility of recuperating, of paying his
debts, of entering with complete con-
fidence into the peaceful competition
of the society of nations. Aleague of
nations, which has its roots only in
statutes, not in the hearts of peoples,
is worthless.
Old Borders Indispensible
"Just as the conquerors hundreds
of years ago treated France forbear-
ingly and left in possession its old
borders, including even German Al-
sace, which had early been taken
away from us just as forcibly as we
took it back, so I believe, there will
be left to us, especially to the East,
our borders which are indispensible
for us politically and economically.
"Not only ethnography, but geogra-
phy should be taken into consideration
in establishing borders. The Poles
and the Czechs have no more right
to our mixed language territories
which owe their prosperity alone to
German organization and to the Ger-
man market, ,than we have to all the
German territories outside of the em-
pire, including the German ports of
Alsace-Lorraine.
Must Have No Boycotts
"Hence a peace of justice would be
only such a one which neither boy-
cotts nor lays upon us intolerable fi-
nancial burdens which would make us
dependent for all time, nor one which
creates untenable borders and robs
us of lands which we require geo-
graphically and economically.
"Mr. Wilson and the British states-
men have announced their war aims
since the abolishing of autocracy and
militarism and of making good the
harm the war has done to Belgium
and France. I expect confidently
that they will not demonstrate the up-
rightness of their intentions and that
they will not create the impression
that a war psychosis now rules there,
Just as it ruled with us during the
war."
ENGINEERING COLLEGE ONCE
MORE ON PEACE SCHEDULE
During the S. A. T. C. regime the
Engineering building was used pri-
marily for training the students in
their necessary military subjects. It
did not take long, however, for the
engineering college to regain its
peace-time status after the armistice
was signed. At the present time, e-
cording to information from the

Dean's office, the engineering college
has done away with all the temporary
classes and is running on the old se-
mester schedule of Uraversity sub-
jects.
PROF. H. THIEME TO LECTURE
BEFORE CERCLE FRANCAIS
"America and France During the
War" will be the subject of a lecture
by Prof. H. P. Thieme at 4:30 o'clock
this afternoon in room 203 Tappan
hall. This.is the first of a series of
lectures to be given under the au-
spices of the Cercle Francais, an ad-
mission of 50 cents being charged for
the whole course. Among other speak-
ers for these lectures will be A. G.
Canfield, and Frieda Bona and Mafthe
Jouard, gr uate students.
Intercollegihte Socialists to Meet
There will be a meeting of the In-
tercollegiate Socialist society tonight
at 1321 Volland avenue.

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