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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 10, 1918 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURStD

RER MICHIGAN MAN
WRITES SPORT ARTICLE
RYIY ILOUIS, '20, GETS SIGNED
STORY IN A. E. F. NEWS-
PAPER
'ormerly a member of the Michi-
Daily editorial staff, First Ser-
nt Harry R. Louis, '20, who en-
,ed in the University of Michigan
t'of the Ambulance corps has been
gored by having a signed article by
iself, appear in the Stars and
Lpes, the official newspaper of the
iks in France.
ouis waIT sent with a part of the
t to Atlanta, Ga. The remainder
it -to France. In Atlanta he was
le the sporting editor of the At-
ta Georgian. He is now some-
re in France.
Article in Stars and Stripes
[is article to therStars and Stripes
is with the proposal of a number
so-called patriots, to compose a
1 team to cross the ocean to chal-
ge the all-American Expeditionary
!ce team. Louis hotly opposes any
hi thingsaying that the proposers
such a move "enlist, and they will
1 much more favor with the sold-
'.
[is complete article is as follows:
tecent editorials against commer-
ized sports between able bodied
eians at home and the doing
of the "Stars and Stripes" sport
e at this time not only met with
approval of every soldier in the
. F. but also also with that of all
rminded and red-blooded Ameni-
s.
Eowever, there still seems to be a
an element who are unaware of
fact that the biggest game of all
;oing on right here. Those I have
rence to are none other than the
ple who are interested ?
ple who are interested in the
, 'heralded "All Star" baseba
m, that is planning to come over
e to meet an aggregation picked
o the A. E. F.
Beat the Hun
ny move of this sort should cer-
:ly be discouraged. The Ameri-
s on this side have only one
ight-that of beating the Hun. As
ecreation pastime the soldiers can
t arrange their own games, a move
ought to allow every true Amer~
, physically fit, to enter the serv-
and make the tong Journey across
pond wearing the uniform of a
ted States soldier.
at those young men who intend to
e this trip for the purpose of play-
baseball enlist, and they will gain
ch more favor with the soldiers in
A. E. F. than they ever will by
ng to arrange a series of ball
tea. The men who are about to
:e this trip have long entertained
people at home on the open-air
in return for which they received
money. Thousands paid to see
i play. But this is no time for
n here. They are all young healthy
. in the prime of life. All of them
id be of much more value to their
itry throwing hand grenades or
g guns than wielding a baseball
Only Fighters Wanted
rce they realize that the A. E. F.
ts only fighting men, who are will-
to risk life and limb for the sake
iberty and humanity, the better
9ill be for all concerned. Sport
ers, physicians, clerks and office
, not near as healthy as baseball
ers, are in the service over here.

rly two million of them are in
ope.
>, kind readers, there's no room
ball players or any one else of
tary bearing over here, except
e who are here for the purpose
nearing the United States uniform.

Music Notes

Men's voices are greatly needed in
the Choral union. The number of
women enrolling this year far exceeds
that of former years. A membership
fee of $2.50 is charged which includes
admission to all concerts given
throughout the year. A deposit of
$1.50 is also required for music which
is returned at the conclusion of the
choral work. Try-outs will be held
from 9:30 to 11 o'clock and from 3:30
to 5 o'clock every day this week in
Professor Stanley's office, at the Uni-
7ersity School of Music.
Professor Stanley has chosen Gou-
nod's "Faust" as one of the works to
be sung at the May Festival. The oth-
er has not yet been decided upon.
The organization of the University
Symphony orchestra has been defer-
red temporarily on account of the stu-
dents' army training corps.
Mrs. Bacher, dean of women at the
School of Music, will speak to all wo-
men of the school at 3:30 o'clock this
afternoon in Frieze hall.
Single tickets for the Caruso con-
cert will be sold at 8 o'clock Satur-
day morning at the School of Music
instead of at Hill auditorium as pre-
viously announced. Mail orders re-
ceived before Friday night will be fill-
ed in order of application in advance
of the public sale. A limited num-
ber of good seats are left on each
floor.
REQUEST STUDENTS' iD
FOR 1ILL-CLADBELGIANS
LETTER RECEIVED DESCRIBES
APPALLING LACK OF
SUPPLIES
A communication to President Har-
ry B. Hutchins from the Commission
for Relief in Belgium asks the stu-
dents of the University to seriously
consider the acute clothing needs of
Belgium and the North of France.
The letter says in part: "The desti-
tute of the occupied regions are in a
pitiable physical condition after their
four. years of constantly growing de-
privation. The health of a large pro-
portion of the population is undermin-
ed by suffering. Coincidently with
this condition, the disappearance of
clothing and supplies has become al-
most complete. With such a lack of
protection against inclement weather,
the suffering that awaits the debili-
tated poor during the coming winter.
and the appalling consequences that
will inevitably follow are plain."
Appeal to Students
In the work of supplying this nec-
essary clothing the commission ap-
peals to the college students to con-
tribute their worn and unused gar-
ments. The students of the University
who wish to donate should take their
contributions to the Belgian Relief of-
fice in the Cornwell building, which is
located at the corner of Fourth and
Huron streets. The office is open from
10 o'clock in the morning to 4 o'clock
in the afternoon. Those not able to
take the clothes to the office should
call Mrs. G. W. Patterson, phone num-
ber 2214. She will make arrange-
ments to collect the packages provid-
ing the person leaves them on the
porch of his or her home. Shoes and
wearing apparel of all kinds are
wanted.
AMERICAN YARDS IUILD
SHIPS DURING SEPTEMBER
Washington, Oct. 9.-American ship-

yards have again set a world's rec-
ord in ship production for the month
of September. Seventy-four vessels to-
taling 362,635 deadweight tons is the
present record.. Of these 45 are steel
ships totaling 259,970 tons, and 29 are
wooden composite ships totaling 102,-
665 tons.
The shipping board also disclosed
that it had received oneal,695-ton ves-
sel on the contract awarded Japanese
yards, and that reports from England
,showed 231,635 tons of ships to have
been constructed at the London Brit-
ish yards.
Y. W. C. A. First Aid Work Unsettled
No definite arrangements have been
made by the city Y. W. C. A. in re-
gard to first aid classes. The classes
which are to be held at Angell house
this year will begin when nurses and
doctors can be secured as instructors.
All University women are eligible t
enter the course in first aid offered
by the city Y. W. C. A. Over 200 were
enrolled in the classes during the sum-
mer.
You will t1lways find satisfaction by
ad veritsiug in the Daily.-Adv.

SUMMER SCHOOL WELL
ATTENDEDDESPITE WAR
250 FEWER MEN AND 100 MORE
WOMEN ENROLLED; WAR
COURSES POPULAR
Summer school attendance of the
past session shows conclusively that
Michigan students paid heed to Presi-
dent Wilson's letter of last spring, ad-
vising students to remain in school in
order to get as much education as
possible.
Figures for the distribution of stu-
dents in the summer of 1918 as com-
pared with those of 1917 show 250 few-
er men and 100 more women than the
previous year. The literary college
leads in increased enrollment, having
an attendance of 655 as against 583 in
1917. All other colleges show a slight
decrease - engineering, 362 to 299
(engineering figures do not include
the mechanics); Medical school, 189
to 160 (these do not include the sen-
ior medics); Graduate school, 255 to
149; Law school, 86 to 38; Pharmacy
school, 25 to 18. A special drafting
course for women contained 46.
The figures also show that a larger
proportion of students were younger
than former years. During the regu-
lar college year 50 per cent of the
students are under 21. During the
summer session of 1918, 393 out of 1,-
304 were under age, as compared with
255 out of 1,449 of the previous year.
War courses of all descriptions were
well attended, among them being a
course on "The Great War," given by
Prof. E. R. Turner, "Foods and Food
Values," in which a special certificate
was conferred by the federal food ad-
ministration, "Practical Hygiene," by
Dr. W.E. Forsythe, "Community Prob-
lems," A. E. Wood, in which home ser-
vice was stressed, and a course in
navigation by Prof. W. C. Rufus.
A series of lectures was given by
some prominent faculty man or out-
of-town lecturer every afternoon and
evening, during the sunimer session,
17 of the number being on war topics.
Among the speakers were: Major Jules
Bellot of the French army, and Rabbi
Eli Myers, of Philadelphia.
Dean Kraus seemed well satisfied
with the summer session both as to at-
tendance and results produced. Other
universities, especially California and
Wisconsin which are grouped with
Michigan as having engineering
schools, showed a greater decrease in
the number of students.
CALL ISSUED FOR
WOMEN WORKERS
Lansing, Oct. 8.-Women of the
state of Michigan are called upon t
replace men in non-essential indus-
tries, according to a telegram receiv-
ed by H. N. Duff, of the Michigan war
preparedness board, from Nathan A.
Smyth, assistant director-general of
the United States employment serv-
ice. The dispatch reads:
"Relocation of total labor demands
among the states will be made at
once. The requirements in your state
will tax your utmost efforts. They
can be filled only by getting men fro:n
non-essentials. Community labor
boards must expedite combing non-
essentials and replace men by wom-
en. Make clear to the people of your
state their duty in the emergency.
"Element of risk- in shell-loading
plants will deter no real man or wom-
an. Americans are not afraid either
in the trenches or at posts of danger
at home."

UPPER PENINSULA. IS HARD
HIT BY INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC
Petoskey, Oct. 8.-Schools and coru-
merce in northern Michigan are par-
alyzed as a result of the influenza
epidemic. PrivateHenry Johnecheck
of Charlevoix, home on a furlough
froni Camp Custer is one of the three
who are victims. Schools, theatres
and pool rooms are closed and stores
are without clerks. Factories are de-
cidedly handicapped from lack of la-
borers. Medical assistance is lacki ig
due to the large number of doctors
and nurses who are ill.
In Levering, two members of the
draft board and all of the clerks are
ill, hence the examination of men is
suspended.
Delmonico's Bankrupt; Claims $799
New York, Oct. 9.-Delmonico's, tha
celebrated New York restaurant, pass-
ed into the hands of the receivers Sat-
urday upon petition of three creditors
whose total claims amounted to only
$799.13. Last year the institution was
doing business of $1,000,000 but its
prosperity suddenly took a war-time
slump, and it- was impossible to cut
expenses enough to meet the sudden
decrease.
Always-Daily service-Always.

MILITARY

WATCHES

WALTHAM

ELGIN

GRUEN

SWISS

in round, square and oval designs.
LEONARD WATCHES IN BLACK AND NICKEL FINISH
SERVICE PINS AND SWEETHEART PINS
PORTRAIT LOCKETS, NOVELTIES, MILITARY
INSIGNIA AND PINS
FOUNTAIN PENS-Waterman, Ideal, Conklin and Swan
ALARM CLOCKS, ASH TRAYS, and PICTURE FRAMES

OPTICAL DEPARTMENT
LENSES GROUND IN OUR OWN SHOP
PROMPT AND EFFICIENT SERVICE

HALLE R

&c FULLER

STATE STREET
JEWELERS

I'.#

Your Fall Suit
will give you that
WELL DRESSED
APPEARANCE
if made by
A. F. MARQUARDT
We also make a specialty of
Officers' Uniforms
Meet us in our new quarters
608 E. Liberty Phone 17134

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.i:
' f

b

WE HAVE JUST RECEIVED

A New Line of

ITALIAN BRIAR

eeVp" PIPES

: _

s

$3.50

To the Newcomer
YOU can obtain
Q DNG your Swatr, Jer-
TPAF sey, Soe, iFoot
{111A 0 ait quipnt, or
\U~ALDI~P~anything else in the
JIrIh athletic line, by
MARK mail from our Chi-
IN * cago Store, almost
IN asi as if you
b£ a called inperson.
Write for catalog of Fall and
Winter Sports
A. G. SPALDING & BROS.
211-2z7 S. State St. CHICAGO
GARRICK M aia;and
DETROIT Saturday
SE.W N & CO. PRES'NTS
"ROCK-A-BYE-BABY"
Direct from Astor Theatre, N. Y.
Nights, 25c to $2. 200 Orchestra Seats, $.o.
Pop. Mat. Wed. Best Seats, $.0
Sat. Mat, 2Sc to $.0.
Try our HOME-MADE
CANDIES
They are both delicious and
Wholesome
MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St.
PNEUMONIA NEWS STRICTLY
CENSORED AT CAMP GRANT
Camp Grant, Ill., Oct. 8.-Strict cen-
sorship prevails at Camp Grant. No
names of soldiers nor the number of
deaths from pneumonia are allowed to
be published. Before this recent or-
der of Col. Charles B. Hagadorn, act-
ing commander, 535 deaths had been
reported, and surgeons feared that the
crisis had not as yet been reached.
New cases are decreasing, but the
death rate is high.
Favorable reports are that the hos-
pital admission rate was cut to 112
new patients, and several hundred
have been discharged.vThe convales
cents will not be allowed to go home,
as has been the custom, but must rest
up in camp. This is to avoid the
spread of the epidemic among the ci-
vilian population. Col. J. Connor of
the surgeon generl's office, reported
favorably after inspection of the base
hospital.
Prospects Look Good for Cold Winter
Fire which began last Sunday in thi
winter coal supply at the University
power house, is still burning. The
original pile of thousands of tons must
be moved to a new place. As this
change is made the fire is being ex-
tinguished by water. In view of the
fact that there is a shortage of help,
it will take nearly a week before the
fire is completely put out.
It is said that probably two or three
car loads of inferior coal which was
mixed with the pile caused spontane-
ous combustion. The fire is entirely
under control as far as its danger is
concerned, and the loss caused by it
is mainly that of the transferance of
the pile.

ALL TABLES RECOVERED
Pool and Billiards..... ..30c per hour
We carry a complete line of Tobacco
and Cigarettes

Majestic
Pool' Hall.

STATE STREET

7e
The Swiss Garment
Cleaning Company

cleans your clothes clean.

SERGT. HARRY LOUIS.

hOSPITALS PLANNED FOR
'UBERCULAR MEN IN SERVICE
Washington, Oct. 8.-Twelve ma-
e hospitals arecto be enlarged and
a new ones built at a probable cost
$10,500,000 to care for 14,000 tu-
rcular soldiers. It is probable that
000 other men will be discharged
similar treatment before January
1920.
t has been suggested that the hos-
als, which are declared a neces-
y by the officers of the public
alth service and war risk insurance
reau, be located in the Berkshire
is of Massachusetts, and in No ;h
rolina.
lirls' Attention - For rainwater
impoo, face and scalp massage, go
Mrs. J. R. Trojanowski, 1110 So.
iversity, side entrance. Phone 696.
kdv.
Daily advertising is profitable.--Adv.

Our methods of cleaning are entirely
different from what most people imag-
ine they are.
Do not think just because your clothes
haven't that gasoline odor that they
haven't been thoroughly cleaned.
They have, as ENERGINE leaves no
odor.
If you will call 2508, our wagon will get
one or a dozen suits.
Phone 2508
CLEANING
PRESSING
REPAIRING Gr
Rapid
R dx
ServiceUTieHJFome of 8nergine"
209 SOUTH FOURTH AVE.

I

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