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October 10, 1918 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1918-10-10

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

iNEXT MONTH

I

N TO START SEASON
MONTH; MICHIGAN
BACK

NEXT

MINNESOTA, OLD RIVAL
SCHEDULED FOR NOV. 13
Chicago, Northwestern, Minnesota and
Ohio State to Oppose Yostmen
in November
With four conference games sched-
uled as the opposition for Michigan's
pigskin stars during the month of
November, the season of 1918 promis-
es to be more interesting than in a
number of years.
The final decision of a committee of
representatives from all of the con-
.ferexice teams which met in Chicago,
has given the Wolverines an interest.
ing list of opponents for the war au-
thrzdgames.
Northwestern to Start
With Northwestern to start the se-
ires at Ferry field, November 2,
Yost's proteges are going to be given
a taste of the strong stuff right off
the reel. The next Saturday will
come one of the most looked for
games of the season when the Maize
and Blue warriors will journey to the
second U. S. city to engage the Unl-
versity of Chicago teams. A great
amount of interest is being shown in
tli~s contest, not only by the fans of
the two teams, but by the football
interested public in general because
of the peculiar circumstances sur-
rounding the game. Thirteen years ago
Chicagohput one over on Michigan
when they tan away with the game
on a safety. Since that time the two
schools have never met, therefore, the
Michigan gridders are anxiously
awaiting the chance to score a more
substantial point on the Chicago
b u n ch .k
Old Rval Next
The following week Minnesota, the
time honored Michigan rival, will
come to Ferry field to meet the Maize
and Blue warriors. This is practi-
cally the biggest contest of the season
because of the everlasting friendly
rivalry that has grown up between the
two schools. Michigan is of the opin-
ion that the Ann Arbor gridders will
come out on top, yet Dr. William'
squad is said to be full of pep. Crit-
ics are of the opinion that the Min-
nesota pang is going to show some
strenuous opposition to Coach Yost's
designs. The result, of course, is dis-
puted. Michigan fans are confident
in their "turry-up" coach.
Ohio State, Last
The last conference game of the
season will be played November 30
with the Ohio State team. Although
the buckeye aggregation got a late
start because of their S. A. T. C. or-
ganization being delayed they are
claiming to have a team that will
carry the honors of the big ten. Last-
season, they were the sensation of
the conference with men like Chick
Harley as their mainstays. In Ohio
there is a great deal of interest shown
in any contest where 0. S. U. and
Michigan get together. Although the
place for the coming battle between
the two teams has not been decided
upon the interested will only be in-
creased, until the place is settled
upon,
Director Sure of Minnesota
Although Minnesota is al long way
from Michigan, the question of wheth-
er the two teams could get together
because of military restrictions was
entertained. Athletic Director Bar-
telme of Michigan asserts that the
game will be played, and the confer-
ece schedule has been made out ac-
cordingly.
BIG LEAGUE BASEBALL MAY
BE BACK NUMBER NEXT SEASON
New York, Oct. 8.-Major league

baseball magnates face a knotty pro s-
lem at the coming annual meetings
when they will be called upon to de-
cide the status of the player at pres-
ent under contract or reserve. Very
few of the club owners hold the opin-
ion, apparently, that it will be possi-
ble to resume league operations next
spring. If such proves to be the case
and there are few indications to the
contrary, it would appear that the
majority of players who figured in the
1918 pennant races will not receive
contracts during the early months of
next year.

I

FORTUNE
Altho this man had not seen any ac-
tion this season,he gives promise
of big things an the Varsity eleven.'

VARSITY
GOOD]

DEFENSEI
IN PRACTICE

If yesterday's practice is any indi-
cation of the strength of the team
Yost will put on the field Michigan
need have no fear for the coming big
Conference games. The Varsity and
the second team scrimmaged for an
hour, and although neither team was
able to push the pigskin over the goal
line, it was because of remarkable
def ensive playing. Twice the first
team carried the ball to within one
foot of the goal, but each time the
scrubs stiffened and turned then
back.
-The outstanding feature of the
scrimmage was the evenness of bal-
ance between the two teams, they see-
sawing from one end of the field to
the other throughout the whole of
the battle. As soon as the goal line
was approached, the attack failed be-
fore a stone wall defense. While the
Case game uncovered a few stars, yes-
leg during the- practice but probably
that should any of these be injured,
there will be a large number of capa-
ble substitutes ready to jump into the
game. Suffice it is to say that Yost
is wearing his old-time smile these
days.
Cohn received a slight injury to his
leg during the parctice, but probably
will not be forced out of the game.
Usher's ankle, which was injured in
the Case game, is healing rapidly, and
the Toledo boy will likely return to
work out in a few days. In spite of
the fact that one ankle ligament was
torn, Usher was down on the field
yesterday.
GERALD FROEMKE PLAYS ON
NAVAL AUXILIARY ELEVEN
Gerald Froemke, formerly halfback
on Yost's 1917 football team, and now
in training at the United States Naval
training school at the Municipal pier,
Chicago, is holding down the quar-
terback job on the eleven representing
that station. The team will meet Chi-
cago university at Stagg field Satur-
day, arrangements having been made
upon the cancelling of the Minnesota
fray, which was to have been played
with the Midway team on that date.
Recently, the training school eleven
defeated Knox, 41 to 0.
Fronke is remembered principally
for his famous 90 yard run to a
touchdown in the Nebraska game on
Ferry field. Although mainly used by
Yost as a halfback, he generaled the
team from the pilot position in the
Michigan-Northwestern battle, and,
had considerable experience during his
freshman year, at quarterback, so is
not without previous training at the
position which he now holds. The
naval eleven is composed largely of
former college players, Minnesota,
Northwestern, Notre Dame, North Da-
kota, and Washington and Jefferson
being represented.
High School to Play Saturday
Ann Arbor high school has schedul-
ed a football game with Plymouth
high school to be played at 10 o'clock
Saturday on Wines field. The teams
are evenly matched and the game
promises to be a fast one. Ypsilanti
high school was scheduled to play
here Saturday but cancelled the game
Monday.

HIGH SCHOOL SHOWS
DECREASED ENROLLMENT
BOYS MUST TAKE FOUR YEARS OF
CYM WORK; GERMAN PRAC-
TICALLY ELIMINATED
Along with everything else, Ann
Arbor High school is feeling the ef-
feet of the war this year. The most
noticeable result is the decrease of
boys enrolled in the junior and senior
classes. This is accounted for not
only by the fact that a great many
have entered military service but al-
so that a large number who have
brothers and relatives in service have
been called upon to bear the financial
burdens of their families. In many
cases where this is not the case, the
high wages offered to men and boys
who are not subject to call has prov-
ed an allurement to youths of high
school age, and Ann Arbor High has
felt a decided slump among the boys.
New requirements have been made
in regard to physical education. By
the new ruling, four years of gymna-
sium work is compulsory for all boys.
The last two years of this work may
be replaced by a military training
course under the supervision of
Frank Raymond, physical director,
who was formerly a lieutenant at
Camp Custer. There are 100 boys now
enrolled in this course and they re-
ceive training from Mr. Raymond in
military methods and drill.
The foreign language department is
now under the supervision of Pierre
S. Zampiere, a native of France and
an instructor in the University of
Chicago for the last five years. He
teaches French, Spanish and Greek.
As in all schools this year, there
was an overwhelming popularity for'
French. The classes have been dou-
bled and are all full.bBeginning
courses in German have been elimin-
ated and only the advanced classes
are continuing their study. Even in
these classes there has been a decided
decrease as many students elected
French instead.
Ann Arbor High school is peculiar
inasmuch as a majority of the students
are of German origin, but G. J. Ray
of the Board of Education, :says they
have had absolutely no trouble with
them and a true American spirit has
been professed by all.
.Reginald ? He 's
In The Army Now
Behold the regular Herpicide "be-
fore 'n after" change in the enlisted
personnel of this, our campus. Only
cast a critical eye at the average S.
A. T. C.'er as he rehearses his salute
between the passing occifers; observe
the way he carries what is left of his
shoulder after shoveling coal for six
hours; note the manner in which he
snaps around the corners on his way
to hash, the bloody glint of determin-
ation in his eye at the mere thought
of the food-snatch, and the fact that
he is almost always, or at least near-
ly always, in step these days. But
above all, consider the fact that even
amidst the most harrowing memories
of food and sheets, he still whistles
"Smiles" and doesn't run it into a
minor at the end either.

S.A.T.C. FRESHMEN
ALLOWED TO PLAY
The new rules regarding Conference
football eligibility allow all men who
could have played under last year's
ruling, and all the men in the S. A.
T. C. to take part in all Conference
games. At a recent meeting of the
coaches and athletic directors of the
Conference football teams this
abridgement of the old rule, making
all freshmen ineligible to compete in
inter-collegiate athletics was made.
This new ruling will make it pos-
sible for any freshmen in the S. A. T.
C. to get a chance to compete in the
big games. Upperclassmen are not
effected by the change and as usual
can take part in all contests.
Those not eligible in Conference
games are needed for the reserve
team, and can do their part by giving
the varsity some strong competition
in the scrimmages. It is hoped that
they will not be discouraged by the
ruling, and that they will practice in
the hope of playing next year.
Preserve your Michigan traditions.
Subscribe now for the Daily, $3.50.
DELUXE
MILITARY STOCKSi
Smooth and Even Patented
Back Crossing
CLUETT, PEABODY U CO., Inc., Troy, N.Y.

SCORES OF NEW FALL

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Just in from New York-and copied from
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A wonderful range of Fall shades-including wood brown,
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Fortune's Injured Knee Again Hurt I War Labor Board Back

Main and Liberty Streets
Ann Arbor

FOR IMMEDIATE WEAR WE HAVE

William Fortune, veteran varsity.
football man, holder of one of the
first team guard positions during the
early practices this fall, but recently
out because of an injured knee, again
hurt the member slightly in the S.
A. T. C. mess hall, last evening, when
one of the seats was knocked against
his leg.

Buy Bonds! It's the best you can do if you can't go to
Var-and you must do that well! (

Washington, Oct. 8.-The Wa
bor board backs higher street
fares, and threatens to cancel all
awards made to employees of
utility companies, if organized
opposes the advanced fares. T
vancement in fares was recomn
in connection with increase of
granted to employees.

SAVE THE PIECES! Broken Eye Glass Lense
ground in our own shop, ame day. Try our service.
Eyes examined.
HALLER t&c 'FULLER 'STATE STREET
HALLE & FULER ELES
1

b

REOPENING OF THE

619 E. LIBERTY

ANN ARBOR

ST.

Executive Offices
1548 Broadway
New York City

MICH.

City News

Several Ann Arbor boys who went
overseas with the 85th division are in
northern Russia according to a let-
ter from Marvin Tomlin recently.
Enrollment in the Ann Arbor high
school this year is 652, about the
same as last year. There is a mark-
ed decrease in the number of students
studying German. No beginning class
was started this year in German.
French is being studied by 206, as
against 42 studying German.
A public rest room will be estab-
lished in the basement of the county
court building in the near future. The
city council last night appropriated
$600 to hire a matron to take charge
of the rooms. It will be furnished by
the Ann Arbor grange. The board of
education will appropriate money to
establish a branch library there.
Benjamin Zahn, a city fireman, was
slightly injured Wednesday afternoon
when he fell from a tree while pick-
ing apples. The exact extent of his
injuries is not certain. He sustained
a fractured collar bone.
Carl Johnson May Be Marine Flyer
Carl Johnson, Michigan's most ver-
satile track man and holder of the
Conference broad jump record, is en-
deavoring to get a transfer from the
S. A. T. C. here to a Marine aviation
training school.

GIVES YOU EXCELLENCE AND PERMA-
NENCE, MAKING SAFE THE ARTISTIC
VALUES YOU MUST PRESERVE IN YOUR

NEXT PORTRAIT.

PHONE 948-W

at the Packard Academy
lay- and Thursday evening,
rivate lessons by appoint-

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