100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 19, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, JANUA

irl ig n il

4 "M

FFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
blished every morning except Monday
.g the university year by the Board in
rol of Student' Publications.
[BER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAsspecited Press is exclusively entitled
ie use for republication of all news dis-
es credited to it or not otherwise credited
is paper and also the local news pub-
tered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
igan, as second class matter.,
bscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.$0.
aces: Ann Arbor Press Building.
ones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
mimunications not to exceed 300' words,
ted, the signature not necessarily to ap-
in print, but as an evidence of faith, and
es of events will be published in The
eat the discretion of the Editor, if left
mailed to the office.
signed communications will receive no
deration. No manuscript will be re-
d unless the writer incloses postage.
e Daily does not necessarily endorse the
nents expressed in the communications.'
ed C. Miglhell.......Managing Editor
Id Makinson........business Manager

I

FIRST
CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Cor. State and William Sts.
10:30 A. M.
LLOYD C. DOUGLAS
Preaches on
"The Chalice of Capacity"
, ..

FIRST
METHODIST CHURCH
REV. A. W. STALKER, D.D.
Ministr
I. C. Jacobson,
University Pastor
SUNDAY SERVICES
At 10:30 O'clock
Sermon Topic:
"FORBIDDEN
MEASUREMENTS"
12:00 to 12:45 (Noon).
College Men's Bible Class
Dr. Stalker, Leader
Subject :
"The Inspiration of the Bible"
6:00 O'clock
Social Hour and Refreshments
6:30 O'clock
Wesleyan Guild Meeting
led by
Mary Baker. and Earle I 11kb

First Baptist
Church
Huron Street below State
10:30
Public Worship
Sermon by
J. M. Wells
"Opens Doors,,
11:50 to 12:40
Guild class, in the Church,
Subject, "Christianity"
6:30 P. M.
Guild Meeting, led by
Tom Carson. Subject,
Some of the Great Things of Life
7:30 P. M.
Lecture on Palestine, by
Dr. Thomas M. Iden

I

Engineers

4
4 1

x

BUY THEM NOW- -THAT SET OF

Dra wing Instruments
$15.00, $18.00, $25.00, $28.00 THE SET
Some Bargains in Second-Hand Sets

cent H. Riordan..........News
Aes R. Osius Jr............. City
guerite Clark...........Night
es C. J Martin.......Telegraph
id B. ILandis...........Sport
tha Guernsey..........Women's
k K. Ehibert..........Associate
en 1. Davis.............Literary

Editor
Edtor
Edixor
Editcs
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

;rozd A. Gaines..Advertising Manager
aes L. Abele.......Publication Manager
nad M. Maor..,.Circulation Manager
n. M. LeFevre..........Office Manager
ISSU4EEDITORS
eph A. Bernstein Paul G. Weber
race W. Porter Philip Ringer
:h Dailey E. D. Flintermann
REPORTERS
rFaretsChristie Herman Lustfield-
ne. Ellis Bowen Schumacher
na Apel Henry O'Brien
rie Crozier Mary D. Lane
Renaud Sherwood
BUSINE SS STAFF
rk B. Covell Robert E. McKean
ward Priehs, Jr. Clare W. Weir
aR. Welsh Wmn. A. Leitzinger
rge A. Cadwell Donnell R. Shoffner
1 F. Schoerger Henry Whiting II
)UNDAY, JANUARY 19, 1919.
ssUe Editor-Joseph A. Bernstein
,MOCRACY'S ATTITUDE TOWARD
BOLSHEVISM
T'he Allies have dispatched a com-
ssion to ascertain and report on
al conditions in Russia; the bolshe-
it government has offered to cease
world propaganda if the Allies
11 treat with them for peace; Russ-
is in Paris, few of whom are bol-
evist, inspire press articles saying
at Allies are in danger of making
emies of the entire Russian people
refusing to recognize or deal with
e governments they have set up. All
which brings the people face to
ce with the bolshevist situation and
apels the formation of a definite
licy dealing with it. The Daily will
empt to consider what bolshevism
before coming to a conclusion, al-
ough The Daily realizes this is con-
ary to precedent in dealing with that
rticular movement.

6:30 P. M.
Plymouth Round Table
'Tne World in Revolution"
tions of Christianity which appear
when the bodies of Christians are
well-nourished have had no oppor-
tunity for development. Such a peo-
ple is credulous, easily influenced by
promises of material benefits impos-
sible of fulfillment. Its individuals
cannot adjust themselves to any na-
tional, much less world environment,
because they are absolutely ignorant
of all national-and world affairs. They
are capable "of atrocities impossible
for us to imagine because human life
is cheap to them.
Taking the conditions into consid-
eration, it seems the wise course to
admit that there are elements in bol-
shevism that are suited to the culture
of the Russians, while we maintain
the most relentless watchfulness with
armed force to prevent them flooding
other lands, in which bolshevism will
not find congenial soil, with their pro-
pagandists capable of causing great
temporary loss and suffering.. We
cannot treat with a government that
is barbarous to classes of its own peo-
ple, but we can and should help the
Russians in every way possible to
find themselves, to overcome class
oligarchy, but, no matter how much
we may be convinced that bolshe-
vism is wrong even in Russia we
should confine our military efforts to
what is necessary to protect ourselv-
es from harm, and should not at-
tempt to overthrow one form of gov-
ernment or another because we think
it bad for the Russians. If self-de-
termination means anything, it means
that.
As to our bolsheviki, the i. W. W.,
they should be treated not as a class
but as individuals. When they break
the law they should receive the law's
punishmbnt . as individuals and no
-attention paid to the defense that they
are political offenders.
Above all, we should not confound
legitimate labor unrest, striving for'
betterment of their lot, according to
American traditions, with the cult of
bolshevism.

I

Wiomen

I

I THE "Y" INN AT LANE HAL L

7 :30 O'clock
Evening Sermon
SIUDENTS ALWA
WELCOME

ufWAH R'S

UNIVERSi1TY
BOOKSTORE

Cleverest ,Th
Will Win

,YS
Bess
Prz e
.rxze

Women are still needed for work at
the Red Cross rooms. Work is carried
on at the rooms on William street
every afternoon except Saturday,
Tuesday and Thursday mornings.
The Women's Athletic association is
defying the weather by announcing a
skating carnival for the evening of
Jan. 29 to be held at the Coliseum.
Among other attractions there will be
a hockey game, the teams of which,
will be made public later. Admission
will be 20 cents.
Dean Myra B. Jordan has been call-
ed out of the city Monday.
A meeting of the social service com-
mittee will be held at 4 o'clock Tues-
day afternoon in Barbour gymnasium.
A tea will be given by Wyvern in
honor of the juniors, Thursday aft-
ernoon at the Kappa Kappa Gamma
house.
The basketball schedule for the
week is as follows: Monday, seniors
and sophomores at 5 o'clock; Tues-
day seniors and freshmen at 5
o'clock; Wednesday, sophomores and~

12:15-1:30
Open to Men and Women

Service Table d'Hote

I

Price 75c

Sunday Only

SPLCIA L SUNDA Y DINNE R

The cleverest, the prettiest, the ug-
liest, the funniest-each will be
awarded a prize at the fancy dress
party to be given Saturday, Januaryl
25, by the Women's league. There
will also be a prize for the best group
costume, and classes will rival each
other in stunts. The advisory board
of the league will act as judges and
will award the prizes.
Girls are advised to come prepared
to patronize the booth to be kept by
the War Work committee, which will
offer for sale trifles to appease the
appetite of the crowd. Members of
organizations which are to be repre-
sented at the party are urged to com-
municate with Cornelia Clark, '21,
chairman of the social committee, be-
fore Thursday.

SHEEHAN & CO
FIX UP THE OLD ROOM
EYE SHADES MAKE WORK EASIER
PENNANTS AND WALL BANNERS MAKE YOUR ROOM INVITING.
Here's hoping you have a fine New Year.--Sheehan

juniors at 3 o'clock; Thursday, juniors
and freshmen at 5 o'clock. All teams
will be chosen by Feb. 15. All those
interested in making the team should
report regularly.
Patronize our aavertisers.--Adv.

For Influenza Cases

OF

Falling Hair
Try

U_

Burnham's
Hot Oil Shampoo
Treatmnt* with this since the recent
spedemic have been very successful

The theory of bolshevism is that all
wealth belongs to those who produce
it by bodily exertion, and the means
of.distribution is syndicalism or actual
ownership and operation of all indus-
tries, including the agricultural, by
those who toil in the industries with
their hands. They do not recognize
any right of the enterpriser, or the
executive, the "headworker," in other
words, to share in wealth. This doc-
trine in itself will prevent the move-
ment attaining headway in this coun-
try, or England, or France if it be-
comes thoroughly understood; if we
take the trouble to demonstrate to
our recent immigrants what those of-
longer residence in this country have
had forced into their consciousness;
that promoting and organization are
necessary to, economic production in a
civilization where distribution is as
complicated a process as in this coun-
try. I. W. W. theories are bolshevist,
and organized labor is the most intell-
igent and implacable foe. the I. W. W.
has.
Bolshevism has attained its great-
est growth and has developed the
most strength in Russia and contigu-
ous countries, where popular culture
resembles that of the Russians. The
explanation for. its ready acceptance
in that part of the world may be found
partly in the fact that agriculture is
largely a communal affair, and there-
fore the syndicalist idea is not rev-
olutionary so much as evolutionary.
About 90 per cent of Russians are ag-
riculturists. Distribution never has
been as complicated a process as in
the United States; the interchange of
food for manufactured products has
been almost primeval in its simplic-
ity.
The hold that bolshevism has on the
inhabitants of manufacturing and job-
bing communities in Russia may prob-
ably best be understood by recalling
conditions before and during the
French revolution. We see a people
impoverished, ignorant, circumscrib-
ed spiritually and mentally by lack of
proper food, clothing, housing, trans-
portation and other ordinary neces-
sities. Interbreeding has cursed com-
munal centers. The softer, finer emo-

That Texas church which discov-
ered oil in its graveyard will prob-
ably substitute ancestor worship for
Christianity.
Foch wants the Watch on the
Rhine to be a French instead of a
German institution.
Paul Eaton writes frdn Gefangen-
enlager. A worse home address than
Kalamazoo.
What is so rare as a day in Jan.?
ROOSEVELT TO BE DISCUSSED
AT ATHENA LIT MEETING
"The Significance of Wilson's Trip
to Europe" will be discussed by Ida.
McGurk, '20, at the next meeting of
the Athena Literary society to be held
at 7:15, Jan. 22, in the Alpha Nu
rooms on the fourth floor of University
hall.
Other speakers will be Ida E. Mines,
'20, Mabel Bannister, '19, Ruth Noron,
'iS, , and Mrs. Evat. They will speak on
"Roosevelt," "The Polish Situation,"
"Germany's Colonies," and "The In-
ftuenza Scourge," respectively. Ida
E. Grattin, '20, will be the critic.
The public is cordially invited to
attend.
MICHIGAN AVIATOR PASSES
THROUGH CITY ON WAY HOME
Bruce I. Millar, ex-'19, who left
here in Dec., 1917, to enter the air
service, passed through Ann Arbor
this week on his way to his home in
Manistique. Millar was stationed in
Eigland for six months and in
France for a few days.
Milar was formerly news editor of
the Daily. He was a member of the
Sigma Delta Chi fraternity and Sphinx
while on the campus. He expects to
re-enter the university next semes-
ter.
Alumni of the University of Wiscorf-
sin are planning for a Union memorial
for university men who have been in
the service of their country.
Daily Want ads bring results.

ANTI-T. B. LEAGUE
TO LAUNCH DRIVE
"Safeguard the health of our children
and form habits of health which will
stay with them through life," is the
slogan under which the Anti-Tuber-
culosis league is working in. con-
junction with the Jnior Red Cross in
the Health Crusade campaign which
is to' be launched on February 9.
This crusade is to be carried on
among the children of the schools, ac-
cording to W. L. Cosper, executive
secretary of the Michigan Anti-Tu-
berculosis lkague.
Headquarters of the movement for
Michigan will be in Ann Arbor, 'W.
L. Cosper, having charge of the work,
with offices on the fourth floor of the
Natural Science building. It will be
his task to get in touch with the
county .:chairmen of .the' Junior Red
Cross, in conjunction with whom the
movement is to be carried on, and
ascertain just how many children will
enroll for the crusade so that the
necessary literature and buttons may
be ordered..
Mr. Cosper stated'that the purpose
of the movement was to coordinate
all similar campaigns and give the
children some incentive, to form hab-
it,; of sanitation and hygiene.

I

Mandolins and

Guitars

GIBSON

Mrs. T. L. Stoddard
TO7 N. University Phone 2662
Shorthand
TypewritinI
Bookkeeping

If you are interested in club work
see our line of instruments before

I

buying.

Hawaiian
Ukulele s

Hamilton Business
College
State and William Sts.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-7:£o a.
rn., and 'hourly to g:1o p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8:48
a. m., and every hour to 9:48 V. m. (x.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6 :oo a. n., and
every twp hours to 9:o5 p. in., io:so p. m.'
To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. M., 12:20 a. ni.,
i:io a. m., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. in., to
12:20 a. m.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R

FOR LIBERTY

A shipment just received from

The following Uasp.alties are re-
ported today by the commanding gen-
eral of the American Expeditionary
Forces: Killed in action, 6; died of
wounds, 63; died from accident and
other causes, 22; died of disease, 33;
wounded severely, 22; wounded, te-
gree undetermined, 10; wounded
slightly, 46; missing in action, 34.
Total, 236.
Total number of casualties to date,
including those reported above: Kill-
ed in action, including 381 at sea, 30,-
388; died of wounds, 12,586; died of
disease, 18,136; died of accident and
other causes, 2,546; wounded .in ac-
tion, 133,973; missing in action, in-
cluding prisoners, 13,374. Total, 211,-
003.
Hour for Zoology I Changed
Zoology I will be given during the
second semester, on Mondays and
Fridays at 8 o'clock, instead of Tues-
days and Thursdays, as printed in the
announcement of the Literary college.
The hours .selected are the same as
were used by the class in Botany I
during the first semester.
Use the Daily to reach the students.
Four thousand students read it every.
morning.-Adv.

Honolulu.

314 S. State St.

Ann Arbor

VEGA

Banjo-Mlandolins, Tenor banjos

banjos, Banjo Ukuleles

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources.........$4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main &' Huron.
707 North University Ave.
0. D. MIllORRILL
Typewriters L
Typewriting
Mimeographing
Has moved to
NcIkool Aroado Phene 1718
First Floor

I

11 fersitvfmusic 'ibouse

tIttm n aguarb .'trttU'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan