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January 19, 1919 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-19

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THE WEATHER
CLOUDY; PROBABLY
SNOWI'f OR RAIN

Sirp

~ktit6g

ASSOCATED
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 80. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JANUARY 19, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

FOUNDER OF DENT
COLLE6E DIES AT
HOME IN CAPITAL
DR. JOHN A. WHATLING, FORMER
MICHIGAN PROFESSOR, GREAT
SURGEON
INDUCED LEGISLATURE
TO ESTABLISH SCHOOL
Funeral Services to Be Held In Ypsi.
lanti Monday; Michigan Men
Plan to Attend
Dr. John A. Watling, one of the
founders of the Dental college of the
University died at his home in Wash-
ington, D. C., yesterday.
Prominent not only in the univer-'
sity world, but in the professional
world as well, Dr. Whatling was one
of the foremost dentists of his time.
Not only did he give the University
his service by helping in establishing
the school, but he also served in the
capacity of a professor shortly after
it was established.
In 186, with the first suggestion of
a college of dentistry at the Univer-
sity, the doctor sprang to the front
with his ardent support of the idea.
But, because of the lack of funds, the
suggestion was dropped, and it was
not until 1875 that it-was again, taken
up.
Appointed to Faculty
Dr. Whatling was instrumental in1
inducing the legislature to appropri-
ate $3,000 a year for two years, for
the establishing of the school. He
was appointed a member of the fac-
uIty with the title of professor of cin-.
tcal and mechanical dentistry. The
title was latter changed to professor
of operative and clinical dentistry.
In 1903, after a most successful car-
eer in the college, he resigned the
professorship, retiring from profes-
sfonal work and moving, with his fam-
ily to Washington, D. C.
During his presence in Michigan, he
was made president, secretary, and '
treasurer of the Michigan Dental asso-
ciation, at different periods.
Born in Illinois
The doctor was born at Woodstock,
Ill. His early education was obtained
at the Ypsilanti Union seminary, and
he later attended the Ohio Dental col-
lege, where he finished his profession-
al training. He graduated from the
Ohio school as a doctor of dental sur-
gery in 1860. Until 1904, he practic-
ed in Ypsilanti. Dr. Whatling was
able to trace his ancestry back to the
La Fontaines, who crossed to England
with William the Conqueror, in 1066.
Since his residence in Washington
he has been elected as an honorary
member of the District , of Columbia
Dental association and of the Nation-
al Geographical society .
Services at Ypsilanti
Funeral services will be held at
2:30 o'clock Monday afternoon in Yps-
ilanti. A number of his associate pro-
fessors will attend the funeral and
will make up the pallbearers. The
complete list of pallbearers has. not
been announced as yet.
.d

Show to Jiene fit
Union in Paris
In order to raise $1,000 for the
benefit of the Michigan bureau of the
American University union in Paris,
a Spotlight vaudeville will be given
Feb. 28 in Hill auditorium. The pro-
duction is sponsored by President
Harry B. Hutchins and given under
the auspices of the Michigan Union.
Tryouts will be held at 7:30 o'clock
Wednesday evening in the old Union
building, under the supervision of
Carl T. Hogan, '20E, general chair-
man of the vaudeville. At this time
it is hoped that candidates will pre-
sent themselves for sleight of hand
work, comedy skits, vocal quartette,
comedy songs, monologue, song .and
dance couple, impersonator, instru-
mentalists, and acrobats.
The successful tryouts will be giv-
en due consideration when the Union
opera cast and chorus calls are issued.
SA9Y S YANKS GET TOO
MUCK CRDTFRVICTORY
CAPTAIN INCE DECLARES MEN
ARE AGAINST "HERO
STUFF"
"One thing the American people
must realize is the small part the
United States played in the final vic-
tory," said Capt. E. C. Ince, who is
spending a few days in this city and
has been awarded a Croix de Guerre
for bravery in France. He lost his
left leg and received 11 other wounds.
"I am surprised to find," he con-
tinued, "that American troops are get-
ting credit over here for Germany's
defeat. For four years our Allies
fought bitterly and well. Many times
it looked as though the German pow-
ers must win, but always at the cru-
cial moment the foe was stopped.
Says It Was Morale
"There was no thought among the
Allies of letting down and when we
entered the war there were 5,000,000
of them with less than 1,000,000 of
us. Our fighting strength never turn-
ed the tide of battle. It was the mor-
ale, the fact that fresh American
troops were at last started toward the
battle fields of Europe that. bolstered
the morale of the allied troops, and
made it possible to stop the German
advance."
Can't Make Hero
Captin Ince said that neither he
nor any other wounded American
soldier wants to be made a hero. They
want an opportunity to take their
place in industrial ,and social Ameri-
ca again, just as though there had
been no war, and they want a chance
to work and play as they did before.
Smiles-and Wiles
on Sale Tuesday
"There are smiles that make you
happy,
There are smiles that make you
blue--"
There are going to be a lot of smiles
all over the campus pretty soon. But
they'll be the happy kind-pink, with-
out any blue ones at all. If you see
some one coming along smilling all
over his face, and burying his nose in
a magazine, and walking into a tree
don't think he is insane or even in
love-with the tree. He's in love with
the magazine because it's the January
Gargoyle, and among other amuse-

nents there is a clever illustrated
parody of "Smiles."- If you want to
be in love too, why 20 cents and a
walk across the campus or to the
book store Tuesday will make you.
Minneapolis Defeats Wisconsin
Minneapolis, Minn., Jan. 18.-Min-
nesota defeated Wisconsin 38 to 11 in
a Western Conference basketball game
here tonight.

CAMP CUSTER OBTIINS BONNET TRttILLSAUDIENCE
DISCHARE OD0ERA SWITH MASTERY Of ORGAN

SOFFICERS ESTIMATE ONE MONTH
AS DEMOBILIZATION
PERIOD
(By Associated Press)
Battle Creek, Jan. 18.-Orders were
received at Camp Custer today for
the immediate demobilization of the
combat units of the 14th division
composed of Illinois, Wisconsin and
Michigan men.
The order will make it possible for
all men, regulars or selects, to ob-
tain their release if their enlistment
is dated later than April, 1917. Reg-
ulars, who were in the army prior to
that date, and the 10,000 men in the
camp units, base hospital force, and
depots brigade are not affected.
One-third of the commissioned offi-
cers in each unit will also be releas-
ed, acco-rding to the announcement.
The 10th and 40th regiments, the
latter ' temporarily located at Camp
Sherman, will return their identity.
The 14th now numbers approximately
22,000 men, and officers estimate that
it will take at elast a month to carry
out the demobilization order.
BOCHES SQUEAL TO
ALLIES FOR JUSTICE
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, Jan. 17 (delayed). - Seats
of departments in the government,
especially the ministers of commerce
and trade, protest against acceptance
by the German government of the
armnistice conditions, the fulfillment
of which, they declared, "means the
organized preparation for starva-
tion."
The secretary of commerce and la-
bor, according to the Tageblatt, de-
clares that Germany will be unable
to replace the agricultural machin-
ery taken because Germany lacks nec-
essary metals, coal and trained lab-
orers. He says German agriculture
will be crippled if the machines are
delivered to the Allies.
The newspapers asked in an edi-
torial:
"Where are justice and humanity
wich were to dictate, peace? We be-
hold always force and only force, and
the German people, after much great
physical and mental sufferings, are
delivered over to destruction."
LIEUTENANT BACK LEAVES
ANN ARBOR FOR CAMP MEADE
Lieut. G. I. Back, who was in charge
of Signal Corps instruction here,
leaves today for Camp Meade, Md.
There he will assume the duties of
instructor in the Signal Corps.
With his departure only four offi-
cers will be left in charge of S. A.
T. C. affairs in Ann Arbor. These
will shortly have all matters straight-
ened up and leave for other stations
or receive their discharge papers. -
Troop Ships Leave France for U. S.
Washington, Jan. 18. - Departure
from French ports of the battleship
New Jersey and the battleship Ne-
braska, and the transports Haverport,
Naui, and Zeelandia, with returning
troops was announced today by the
war department. The battleships and
the Zeelandia are scheduled to arrive
at Nw Port News, the Haverford at
Philadelphia, and the Naul at New
York.

NUMBER OF CLASSICAL SELEC.
TIONS BRINGS ARTIST MUCH
APPLAUSE
Displaying a mastery of every mood
of the organ, Joseph Bonnet, the
I French artist, won the wholehearted
approval of a large audience last
night at Hill auditorium. He was
successful in his interpretations of a
large range of feeling; from the
triumphal Finale of Guilmant's First
Sonata to Parde Martini's airy, danc-
ing Gavotta, and the mystical second
part of the Choral in A Minor, of Ce-
sar Franck.
The audience, a bit deliberate at
first, soon warmed enthusiastically un-
der the touch of Bonnet's masterly
work. He responded with the special
numbers, Chauvet's Andantino and the
Cortege of Debussy. The concert be-
gan with The Star Spangled Banner
and closed with the Marselleise. Be-
neath the organist's touch this last
piece flamed into life. This followed
the strongest of Bonnet's own compo-
sitions, the Variations de Concert.
During the concert the artist seemed
a tall, grave man whose heart was
in his music, with no unnecessary at-
tention paid to his audience.
Afterward, in a private interview,
h was a typical well bred French-
man, graceful and enthusiastic. He
was especially warm in his admira-
tion of the Frieze Memorial organ.
PAVLOWA'S PUPIIJ
APPEARS SATURDAY
Musical and artistical Poland will
be vividly portrayed Saturday night,
when a Polish concert of celebrated
artists will be held in the Ann Arbor
High School auditorium under the
auspices of the Cosmopolitan club.
Miss Flsie Konieczna, 12-year-ld-
pupil and protege of Pavlowa, will
feature the program with a represen-
tation of the Polish national dance,
and 'will also render Pavlowa's "Ga-
votte." With Miss .Konieczna, comes
Miss Jenette Kruzka, who acquired
fame as a ballet dancer in her execu-
tion of the "Golden Butterfly" in Mil-
waukee. She will present a Pade-
rewski ballet dance known as "Schar-
wenka's Dance."
Jan Sznlczewski, graduate of the
promising young violin virtuoso, will
render the "Second Polonaise Bril-
lante." Miss F. Sznlczewski, an ac-
complished pianist, and sister of the
young violinist, will give a recital of
some of the masterpieces of Chopin,
princpially his "Scherzo."
Among the other artists on the
program will be Miss Anna Kowal-
ska, rising young soprano of Detroit,
who last season made her debut in
grand opera. She is a member of
the vocal department of the Ganapol
School of Musical Art of Detroit, and
two years ago won the endowment
membership of the Tuesday Musicale
of Detroit.
The artists to appear in the Polish
concert are rendering their services
gratuitously to the Cosmopolitan
club. Their only motive is to aid in
the dissemination and expression of
Chicago Conservatory of Music, a
Slavic culture.

Captured, Given
Cross, Now Free
Lieut. Wilfred Casgrain, '17, one of
the first American airmen captured by
the Huns, has been decorated by the
French with the Croix de Guerre.
When first captured he was in a pris-
on camp in southern Germany, but
soon afterwards was transferred to
the Island of Rugen, where he has
been for the last 12 months. In his
letters from Rugen he said he was
being treated well and that he thought
the "German beer was 0. K." Lieut.
Col. B. M. Atkinson invested Lieut.
Casgrain with the medal, on behalf of
Marshal Petain, for bravery during
fighting.
Lieutenant Casgrain is visiting his
aunt in Paris, and expects to be home
soon. He is son of C. W. Casgrain,
Detroit attorney.
WOMEN DECIDE TO LIMIT
ATTENDANCE AT MIXERS
GYM TOO SMALL TO HANDLE
THE LARGE NUEBER
PRESENT
Attendance at all campus mixers
to be held at Barbour gymnasium in
the future is to be limited, it was de-
cided at a meeting of repesentatives
of the Women's'league, held in Bar-
bour gymnasium yesterday morning.
Discussion of the mixers revealed
the fact that they have not been as
successful as was hoped, because of
the unwieldly crowds that have at-
tended. More than half of those who
put in an appearance at the gymna-
sium on mixer days, were unable to
partake in the fun, and dancing, be-
cause of the limited capacity of the
floor.
To Break Down Cliques
With the idea of breaking down
cliques, and furthering the demo-
cratic spirit on the campus, the de-
cision of the Women's league was
reached. They decided that to make
the affairs successful, it would be nec-
essary to have a large reception com-
mittee composed of both men and
women, to make those who attend ac-
quainted with each other, instead of
leaving it to their own initiative. It
has been impossible for more than
half of the people to dance, in the
past, because of the overcrowded con-
ditions.
Mixers held merely for the purpose
of making money will therefore be
discontinued, and will be held only
for the purpose of making the stu-
dents acquainted with each other, as
was originally planned.
Must Meet Chaperons
All students who attend will be ex-
pected to meet the chaperons in
charge. Introductions will be made
as necessary at the mixer as at any
private dance.
Those who wish to come from idle
curiosity, and seek to stand around
and watch the dancers, are urged not
to come, because, the women feel it
destroys the object of the gatherings.
FELIX LEVY TO ADDRESS JEW.
ISH STUDENT CONGREGATION
Dr. Felix Levy, of Chicago, will
deliver the sermon at the services
of the Jewish Student congregation
In Lane hall at 2:45 o'clock Sun-
day afternoon. A large University
attendance has been' established at
the services this year. The serv-

ices Sunday will include a special
musical program, and will be open tor
the public.
Wemen Not to Be Discharged
Washington, Jan. 18.-The D. U. R.
of Detroit was ordered to retain in its
employ women now serving as con-
ductors in a decision by thl national1
war labor board.

P~OINCARE OPENS
PEACE CONGR ESS
By FIERY. SPEE~C
DELEGATES PLACE LEAGUE (
NATIONS AT HEAD OF
PROGRAM
WILSON NOMINATES
PREMIER CH AIRMA
Congress to Decide Three Importi
-Questions During First 'Week
of Meeting

r

(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 18.-The peace confer-
ence, destined to be historic and on
which the eyes of the world are now
centered, was opened this afternoon
in the great salle de la Paix.
The proceedings, which were con-
fined to the election of Georges Cle-
menceau, the French premier, as per-
manent chairman of the congress, an
address of welcome by the President
of the French Republic, Raymond
Poincare, and speeches by President
Wilson, Premier Lloyd George and
Baron Sonnino, were characterized by
expressions of lasting friendships and
the apparent determination of the
representatives of the various nations
to come to an amable understanding
with respect to the problems to be
decided by the congress.
Delegates Fail to Applaud Poneae
When President Poincare conc uued
the entire assembly stood, and the
fact that, according to custom, wo ap-
plause greeted his utterances gave so-
lemnity to the scene.
Monsieur Clemenceau's acceptance
of the presidncy of the congress was
both a feeling expression of pers'onal
gratitude and a definite ouline of the
great questions immediately ahead.
Three of these larger general sub-
jects, he defined, as the responsiblity
for the war, responsibility for crimes
during the war, and international la-
bor legislation. The league of na-
tions, he declared, was at the head of
the program for the next full session.
To Decide Kaiser's Fate
"Our ambition is a great and noble
one," said Monsieur Clemenceau. "We
wish to avoid a repetition of the ca-
tastrophe which bathed the world in
blood. If the league of nations is to
be practicable we must all remain
united. Let us carry out our program
quickly and in an effective manner."
Referring to the origin of the war
he said he had consulted two eminent
jurists on the penal responsibility of
the former German emperor, and each
delegate would receive a copy of that
report.
Text of Wilson's Speech
"Mr. Chairman:
"It gives me great pleasure to pro-
pose a permanent chairman of the
conference, M Clemenceau, the Pres-
ident of the council. .
"I would do this as a matter of cus-
tom. I would do this as a tribute to
the French republic. But I wish to
do it as something more than that. I
wish to do it as a tribute -to the man.
Paris Scene of Past Conferences
"France deserves the precedence,
not only because we are meeting at
her capital and because she has un-
dergone some of the most tragical
suffering of the war, but also be-
cause her ancient and beautiful cap-
ital has so often been the center of
conferences of this sort on which the
fortunes of large parts of the world -
turned.
"It is a very delightful thought that
the history of the world, which has
so often centered here, will not be
crowned by the achievements of this
conference-because there is a sense
ill which this is- the supreme con-,
ference of the history of mankind.
"More nations are represented here
than were ever represented at such
(Continued on Page Six)

PAY YOUR PLEDGE!
All War Work pledges, which
were due yesterday, must be
paid up at once, so that the local
books may be straightened up
and sent on to the central office.
-The pledges may be paid at
Lane hall, Barbour gymnasium,
or by mail to Mr. I. Lei Sharf-
man, Lane hall.

PRESBY'TERIAN CHURCH
HURON AND DIVISION
LEONARD A. BARRETT, Minister
10:3o Theme. "Storms"
6:30 Young People 's evening Serbice with
Social Half Hour beginning at 6 o'clock,
Students heartily welcome

'.

CHRISTIAN

SCIENCE

LECTURE

By Frank Bell, C. S., of Philadelphia, Pa.

Whitney Theatre, Sun., Jan. 19, 3 p. m.--all are cordially invited

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