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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 18, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, JAN'

FICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
lished every morning except Monday
the universty year by the Board in
1 of Student Publications.
BER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Associated Press is exclusively entitled
use for republication of all ners dis-
scredited to it or not otherwise credited
i paper and also the, local news pub-
herein.
Bred at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
ian, as becond class "matter.
scriptions by carrier or -mail, $3.50.
es: Ann Arbor Press Building.-
nes: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
tmunications not to exceed 300 words,
ed, the signature not necessarily'to ap-
n print, but as an evidence of faith, and
s of events will be published in The
at the discretion of the Editor, if left
mailed to the office.
gned communications will receive no
eration. No manuscript will be re,
unless the writer incloses postage.
Daily does not necessarily endorse the
,ents expressed in the communications.
d C. Mighell.......Managing Editor
Makinson........business Manager

I the new --overnment ;

are Michiean al- I

umni and alumnae. They have done
so well inother things thatdthe new
regime,' installed only* a few days ago,
decided they were the best fitted to
carry out the honest, progressive,
communal-welfare ideals the citizenry
installed when it adopted its new
charter.
All of which should give food for
thought to those persons who condemn
universities as mere propagators of
theories and producers of impractical
theorists. Experience is against them.
NOW, 4LL TOGETHER
A real old-time moss-meeting to in-
still old Michigan "pep" has at last
been made a certainty by the Student
council. The need of such a get-to-
gether has been apparent since the
demobilization of the S. A. T. C. Now
that it is to be a reality, those who
have been talking for one must show
their sincerity by being there and by
bringing their friends. The meeting
cannot accomplish its purpose unless
every Michigan man who can possibly
do -so is on hand.+
Along with being a "pep" instiller
the promoters intend to arouse the
interest of more men in campus ac-
tivities and get some material results
by having every man signify in what
particular activity he is most inter-
ested. Most fraternity men are prac-
tically compelled to go 'out for some
activity. This meeting intends to ex-
plain campus activities to all and
arouse them to do something.
Be on hand ready to be instilled.
Some persons complain that stu-
dents do not keep in touch with cur-
rent events by reading the newspap-
ers. But to read newspapers nowa-
days is not to get into the current;
it is to be whirled about in a mael-
strom.

Inspector Favors
N on-Affiliation

t H. Riordan...........News
R. Osius, Jr........City
rite Clark... .....Night
C. J.Martin. .....Telegraph
B. Landis........Sport
Guernsey..........Women's
K. Dhisbert..........LAssociate
1. Davis ....... ..Literary

, w

Editor
Ed.±r
Editor
Editu.
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

nd A. Gaines....Advertising Manager
L. Abele.......Publication Manager
eM. Major......Circulation Manager
A.LeFevre.. ...Office Manager
ISSUE E~DITORS
A. Bernstein Paul G. Weber
W. Porter ' Philip Ringer
)ailey E. D. Flintermann
REPORTERS
et Christie Herman Lustfield
Ellis Bowen Schumacher,
BowHenry O'Brien
Crozier Mary D.Lane
Renaud Sherwood

"I do not believe teachers' associa-
tions should affiliate with any one or-
ganization but should remain free and
Independent to co-operate with all,"
says Prof. J. B. Edmonson, inspector
of high schools, in speaking of the
proposal at the University of Illinois
for associating the American Federa-
tion of Teachers with the American
Federation of Labor. "I believe more
can be accomplished by working with
the labor unions, the grange, cham-
bers of commerce, womens' clubs, and
similar organizations, rather than by
allying to a single one."
Here in Michigan the State Teach-
ers' association is considering plans
for co-operating more closely with,
various state associations such as the
Federation of Labor, Federation of
Women's clubs, the State Grange, and
the Bankers' association. This meth-
od of obtaining better salaries and
other improvements is favored by the
above quoted speaker.
REDUCTION IN MEN'S CLOTHING
PRICES TO COME GRADUALLY
Chicago, Jan. 17.-No marked fluc-
tuation in the price of men's cloth-
ing is likely to result from the ter-
mination of the war, in the opinion
of Charles E. Wry, secretary of the
Nationalassociation of retail cloth-
iers.
Information gathered by various
committees and submitted at the as-
sociation's reconstruction conference
here today, points to a gradual and
comparatively slight change in price,
probably not noticeable until next
-fall, delegates said.
Reduction in price in some clothing,
lines and increased price in others
was predicted. This, it was stated,
will be governed largely by supplies'
of material. It is not believed that
there will be any material change in
wages paid in the manufacture of
clothes.
GEOLOGICAL FIELD OFFERS
BIG OPPORTUNITY TO WOMEN

i WRome n
A meeting of the board of repre-
sentatives of the Women's league will
be held at 9 o'clock this morning in
Barbour gymnasium.
One who is able to teach commer-
cial English is needed at the Univer-
sity hospital. For particulars inquire.
of Hulda Bancroft, Barbour gymnas-
ium.
The social service committee will
meet at 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon in
Barbour gymnasium.
Girls are needed to sew on the 150
hospital shirts received by the War
Work committee, of the Women's
league. Call Florence Field, '20, for
further information.-

Drawing Instruments
$15.00, $18.00, $25.00, $28.00 THE SET
Some Bargains In Second-Hand Sets

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

I Don't fail to visit our new lunch room.

Engineers

BUY THEM NOW --THAT SET OF

FOR LIBERTY

Everything to Eat
Hot and Cold Drinks

BUSINESS
B. Covell
rd Priehs, Jr.
R. Welsh
e A: Cadwell
F. Schoerger

0

STAFF
Robert E. McKean
Clare W. Weir
W mnA. Leitzinger
Donnell R. Shoffner
Henry Whiting 11

The following casualties are report-
ed today by the commanding general
of the American Expeditionary Forc-
es: Killed in action, 73; died of dis-
ease, 29; wounded severely, 63;
wounded ,degree undetermined, 68;
wounded slightly, 59; total, 292.
BOOZE RUNNERS PAY COUNTY
$4,000 IN FINES SINCE MAY
Fines amounting to more than $4,-
000 have been paid to the Washtenaw
county treasurer by bootleggers and
liquor runners since May 1, 1918. A
large sum representing the court ex-
penses of the liquor bases has also
been paid to the local office.
The fine money, which is popularly
supposed to go to the county, is turn-
ed over to the state library fund to be
apportioned among the school dis-
tricts, by the state school commission-
er for educational purposes. The
costs money is given to the county.
Daily advertising is profitable.--Adv.
Hotel Allenel I
ANN ARDOR'S LEADING HOTEL

338 Maynard

Across from Arcade

SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1919.
Issue Edior-Paul G. Weber
THE DRY UNITED STATES
"Wet and dry territory" will soon
scome as obsolete an expression as
lave and free states." The people
"the United States have banished al-
hl by the sternest and most in-
astic legilation inetheir power, an
nendment to the federal constitu-
In. For Michigan this means two
.ins: the present prohibition law is
>t, as had been hoped for by "wets,"
reversible measure; and the era of
iotlegging, now the chief sport of
uthern Michigan, has a definite and
viftly approaching end. The i.ndivid-
L citizen who does not drink is more
less relieved, depending on the
rength of his prejudice against the
Cit and how :much of the suffering
used by it has entered into his ob-
rvation; the moderate drinker is
ass, but a few months of life in dry
rritory has shown him that drink is
>t as essential to his happiness as
had supposed; the man to whom
'ink has been an end in itself will
ake his own, for a while anyway.
he present generation is doing what
'esent generations must do, sacrifice
bits for the sake of the future cit-
enry, its family and industrial and
cial life. And that future is so
ose that the only sincere mourners
r deceased Barleycorn are the in-
;rests he has enriched.
OUR THEORY FACTORY
Within a few miles we see a city
at has gone far to rid itself of the
.ame of American life-corrupt and
Isteful city government. That De-
bit has advanced rapidly in purify-
g its municipal affairs should be
matter of pride to the University of
Ichigan and an inspiration to its
udents, for the University, through
' faculty' and other resources, has
ine much to help Detroit achieve
iat it has. Many of the good govern
ent ideas Detroit has adopted or
adopting were developed by a state
unicipality organization of which
veral of, the University faculty are
embers. The planning of the Belle
le bridge, on which the new multi-
illionaire but human and humane
ayor, James Couzens, laid so much
ress in his inaugural address, was
rgely done by members of the Uni-
rsity faculty. The thing which May-
r Couzens emphasized the most
rongly, the recreation commission,
as started and built up by a Mich-
an alumnus, Ira W. Jayne, now cir-
it judge of Wayne county. The at-
ck on private ownership of the street
aiway system will be led by~ another
ichigan alumnus, Clarence Wilcox,
SL.
It is members of the University fac-
Ity who have lectured on fundament-
is in sociology and penology to so-
al workers of Detroit, with the re-
lt that the welfare commission,
hich deals with the "human culls of
dustry," to use the words of Mayor
arx, will be expended in its scope

We make our own baked goods.

TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM

THE "Y" INN AT LANE HALL
Students! Eat where you get the proper kind of
food. All Home Cooked Food.
Lunch, 11:45-12:45 . . . 40 cents
Dinner, 5:30-6:30 . . . 50 cents
Lunch and Dinner, der week, $5.00

"That distinctive college atmosphere
we college men prize so highly," com-
plained the sophomore, "is distinctly
lacking this year. Few galoshes are
to be seen."
"Free Sunday matinees tax capacity
of Elks."-Headline. Accomplishing
what we had always supposed to be
the impossible.
Przemysel is once more with us. It
should be much easier to pronounce
since the influenza epidemic.
CLASSICAL C L U B
TO PRODUCE PLAY
A Greek or Roman play will be
staged by the Classical club some
time during the second semester if the
present plans of the club carry
through.
There has been some doubt as to
whether existing conditions would per-
mit of the presentation of a play this
year, but at the last meeting of the
club it was decided as things were
becoming normal it is now practicable.
No decision has been made as to
what play will be produced, but it will
be a play in Latin or Greek, or one
translated from one of these langu-
ages as in former years.
Last year a Greek play, translated
to the English, was put on by the
club. It played to an audience of
2,000 here, and one almost as large in
Detroit.
LOCAL Y STARTS CAMPAIGN;
300 NEW MEMBERS EXPECTED
The local board of the Y. M. C. A.
will launch a membership campaign
beginning the afternoon of Monday,
Jan. 20, and ending at 6 o'clock of
the following Thursday. Three hun-
dred new members is the goal set by
the workers.
A reduction of $1 will be made on
1l senior, intermediate and junior
dues paid in full during the cam-
paign.
In connection with the campaign,
slides of the pool at the Y and pic-
tures featuring Corsan, the world fam-
ous swimmer, will be shown.
WOMEN'S LEAGUE BOARD TO
HONOR ADVISORY COMMITTEE
The board of the Women's league
will entertain with a tea. in honor
of the advisory board of the league
from 4 to 6 o'clock Wednesday after-
noon, at the home of Cornelia Clark,
'21, 907 Lincoln avenue.
The advisory board is composed of
the following members: Mrs. W. P.
Lombard, Mrs. W. W. Bishop, Mrs.
Neil Williams, Mrs. John Waite, Mrs.
Arthur G. Hall, Mrs. Junius Beal, and
Mrs. Albert Crittenden.
Twentieth Roof Fire in Two Weeks
The twentieth call within the last
two weeks to put out small roof fires,
was answered by the, local fire de-
partment yesterday when an alarm
was put in by Miss '"Eliza Cady at
516 Packard street. Slight damage

Service Table d'Hote

Open to Men and Women

I A
SIH-E EHA & .

Three women, graduates of the
University, have made exceptional
success in the geological field and
there is considerable opportunity for
women in the editorial and secre-
tarial work as well as in teaching, ac-
cording to authorities of the geolog-
ical department.
A good rhetorician who has a
knowledge of geology may obtain a
position with a company to put the
collected data of its field workers in
good form, or with one of the state
surveys correcting the manuscripts
for publication or for file. The teach-
ing profession offers opportunities for
interesting study as well as progress.
Automobile Courses Prove Popular
The four weeks course in operation
and repair of automobiles, tractors,
and trucks is proving one of the most
popular short courses ever given at
the University of Nebraska. One hun-
dred and twenty-five men have regist-
ered for it.
Men who enlisted from Indiana
State may partially make up the time
lost.. At present 10 hours is the max-
imum amount of credit to be given.

Special
Chicken Dinner
Sunday
Cor. Huron St. and Fourth Ave.

FIX UP THE OLD ROOM
EYE SHADES MAKE WORK EASIER
PENNANTS AND WALL BANNERS MAKE YOUR ROOM INV ITINO

Here's hoping you have a fine New Year.-Sheehan

J

I

THE SHOP FOR MEN
Saturday Night Special
6:30 TO 9:30
$ 1.50 and $2.00
SILK TIES,.

. c

'A

Try our HOME-MADE

CANDIES

They are both delicious and
Wholesome

$1.35 each

A M. DONALDSON
711 N. University Ave.

Ii $

I

TRUE QUALITY
Is stamped on every suit we tailor. Our specialty is
making clothes for men who know the value of being
well groomed-who appreciate the correctness and indi-
vidual good style we put into our clothes. This is what
makes our clothes so desirable and so economical.

MADE AND SOLD AT
THE SUGAR BOWL
Phone 967 109 S. Main St.
DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arboi and Jackson
(October 27, 1918)
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express;Cars-7:to a.
in., and hourly, to 9 : xo p. mn.
Jackson Limited and Express Cars-8 :4,
a. m, and every hour to 9:48 p.. m. (Ex.
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound- 0oo a. i., and
every two hours to 9 :o5 p.,in., 10:50 p. mn.
To Ypsilanti only, 11:4s"p. m., 12:a a. M.,
t :1o a. m., and to Saline, change it Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7:48 a. n:., to
12:20, A. i.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m
Phone 1620.R
314 S. State St. Ann Arbor
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $550,000.00
Resources........4,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron.
707 North University Ave.
4. D. MORRILL
Typewriters
typewriting
Mimeographing

There is a Certain In d e sic riba ble
Satisfaction in Wearing Good Clothes

Clothes that are distinct--snappy--that look as though they belonged to
you, and feel that way too.
An assortment of fabrics to choose from---varied, unusual and corred.

Dress Suits
for
Hire

1. KARL MALCOLM

Ready-to-Wear,
Overcoats
at 1-4 OFF

I

604 E. Liberty Street

Has moved
ads

Nkels A

rt-

' '

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