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January 18, 1919 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-18

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THE WEATHERI
RAIN AND COOLER
TODAY
I_______________________________________________

tri 'an

til

ASSOCIATEDI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERTICE

VOL. XXIX. No. 79. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 1919. PRICE THREE CENTS

PEACE CONGRESS
OPENS ITSDORS
THIS AFTERNOON
STAGE SET FOR GREAT FORMAL
OPENING OF WORLD CON=
FERENCE
DELEGATES REPRESENT
ALL PARTS OF GLOBE

President Poincare to Deliver F
Address; to Speak on Recon.-
struction Work
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 17.-The scene is
for the opening of the peace
gress at 3 o'clock Saturday a
noon with the impressive ceren
befitting such an eventful occas
The final details were concluded
night at the meeting of the supr
council, which completed its le
and adjourned for the inaugura
of the larger body tomorrow.
The secretariat of the cong
during the evening completed the
ficial list of the delegates. It inclh
a distinguished array of leading l
lic figures from every section of
civilized globe, and in personnel
in the interests represented it
braces one of the most notable g
erings of statesmen the world
ever seen.
Opening to Be Ceremonial Affa
The final preparations were
cluded- today in the beautiful
de la Paix at the foreign o
Swhere the ,ongress will meet,
the green table now awaits
guests. The opening tomorrow
the congress will be the ceremo
function, the readers making t
first bows,- the delegates exchang
salitationsl and the Republic g
in gorgeous uniform lending col
the scene.
Poincare to Deliver Address
When the delegates are insta
around the great horseshoe table, F
mond Poincare, president of Fra
will make his entry into the hall
take his place in the presiding
cer's chair at the head of the to
The opening address of M. P
care will sound the glories of the
just won and tell of the moment
work of reconstruction entrusted
'the congress.
PADEREWSKI FORMS
NEW POLE CABINI
(By Associated Press)
Warsaw, Jan. 16. (delayed).-Ig
Paderewski has reached an ag
ment with General Pilsudski and
succeeded partly in forming a
Polish cabinet. General Pilsui
will be foreign minster under Pe
rewski as premier which will per
General Pilsudski to return much
his power. The new cabinet is
ject to approval of German Pol
It will continue in office until e
tions are held within the next f
night.
Amsterdam, 'Jan.. 17.-The Et
government has under advisemen
draft of a constitution for Germ
prepared by a Professor Preuse,
Berlin, and has agreed to the fur
mentals of the proposed constitut
The federal character of Germ
will be maintained and the cour
will be composed of a number of :
eral states.
At the head of the government i
be president elected for 10 years R
a government composed of a cl
cellor and his ministers. There
be a national chamber "volksha
elected by all the people, and a
eral chamber "statenhaus" elected
the national representatives and
federal states.
Redkin Gives I. W. Ws. Long Te
Sacramento, Jan. 17. - Senten
ranging from one to 10 years'
prisonment were imposed by Ju
S. H. Redkin, of Spokane, on 43
the 46 defendants convicted in

I. W. W. anti-war conspiracies.
Sentence on Miss Theodora F
lock, Basile Sassores, A. L. Fax,
only three defendants represented
an attorney, was held up by th
counsel, who said a motion for a r

GIFTED ORGANIST
APPEARS TONIGHT
Ann Arbor is the envy of many Am-
erican cities that have been unable to
secure bookings with Joseph Bonnet,
the French organist, who plays at 8
o'clock this evening in Hill auditor-
ium.
Aided by a remarkable memory he
plays without score works by Men-
delssohn, Brahms, and Liszt. During
1910-11 Bonnet gave forty recitals at
St. Eustace, no single number being
played more than once. These were
the means of inaugurating in Paris a
great popular movement in favor of
organ music.
Le Canada Musical says of Bonnet:
"Bonnet possesses the art of rhythm
in the highest sense. Above all he
has magnetism which impresses his
hearers with his artistic conception."
'19Man, Released
by Huns, in N. Y.
Lieut. Paul W. Eaton, ex-'19, ar-
rived in New York Thursday, on
board the British steamer Belgic, aft-
er having been a prisoner in Ger-
many for seven months. He was
wounded at Ypres last April when a
machine gun bullet wet through his
lungs as he was flying at a height
of 4,000 feet. He fell back of the Ger-

and man lines and was made prisoner.
em- Some light on Eaton's state of mind
ash- at the time of the signing of the arm-
has istice is given in the following ex-
cerpts from a letter dated Nov. 12, at
dr Villingen, Baden, Germany, and re-
con- cently received in Ann Arbor:
hall "I am writing this from the Gefan-
iffice genenlager. It is hard to realize that
and I am at last free. No more guards,
its no more roll calls, no more German
of soup, and no more "no more's." Man!
'nial The end of this week completes for
heir .me a seven months' period as a pris-
ging oner of war, and that is a long, long
card time, I assure you, especially in such
r to. a god-forsaken country as this. I
must tell you tlytt I've taken that
"wonderful," "exquisite" trip "along
iled the Rhine" that so many go into ecst-
ay- asy over, but if you ever have the
nce, travelling fever, go to Yellowstone
and park! This "seeing the world" idea
offi- is' like charity-it should begin at
ible. home.
oin- "I suppose you have heard from Bill
war Casgrain. He is up in Prussia some-
tous where.
I to "My position as a silent watcher
of the internal situation in Germany
has been an 'interesting one. For a
couple of days here, history was being
made so fast it was practically im-
possible to figure out just how it was
all going to end. I pity the school
kids of the next generation.
"Am enclosing picture of Dr. Wil-
nate liam H. Gordon, '15M, Johnson D.
ree- Kenyon, '17A, and myself-the Uni-
has versity of Michigan's representatives
new in the American officers' prison camp
dski at Villingen, Baden, Germany.'
ade- An interesting feature of the picture
mit is that it contradicts a recent report
of to the effect that Dr. Gordon had one
sub- of his hands cut off by his Teuton
and. captors. The photograph shows Dr.
lec- Gordon in possession of both mem-
ort- bers.
Eaton also states that he is com-
ing back to school, and It is thought
Bert probable that lie will return next sem-
t a ester.

WAR NOT DYER UNTIL
PEACE TERMS SIGNED
MISS FRASER SAYS LARGE RE.
CONSTRUCTION PROBLEMS
ARISE
"The war is not over till peace
terms are sealed and signed," said
Miss Helen Fraser in her lecture Fri-
day evening in the Natural Science
lecture room. "There is too much
inclination to regard the war as done,
and we do need to realize that the
practical task of finishing the work
properly remains."
Miss Fraser then told of the attitude
of the English on the League of Na-
tions. The mass of the people there
feel strongly on the League of Na-
tions. They are not willing to go back
to the conditions prior to the war, but
want the nations so leagued together
that such catastrophies as the one
just past cannot be repeated. They
do not want the enemy in the League
of Nations until he is truly penitent,
she made plain.
Don't Pity Wounded
"Concerning the. practical problems
of reconstruction," she went on, J"we
must first face the problems of our
men still in need of help. When the
army is in occupation of foreign ter-
ritory, it needs 'these things even
more. But when they come home dis-
abled, the right way is not to pet
them, to pity them, not to talk to them
or of them as broken for life, but to
show that' we believe they are still fit
for life work.
"The rebuilding of shattered France
and parts of Belgium is another pro-
blem that confronts us in reconstruc-
tion," she stated. "No man should
pass judgment on the terms of the
armistice unless he has seen the deso-
lation caused by the war. The work
of restoring the north of France will
take about five million hours of work,
and the German prisoners should be
made to work on the shattered por-
tions and help to retore it.. The peo-.
ple of France want to go back to the
devastated land, but the very roads
must be built first, and other things
to make it even habitable."
World Needs Justice
She gave a new and different con-
ception of the duty of the Allies to-
ward the people, and said that the
workers must be people who can
bring into the life of democracy, art,
music, and all splendid things, as
well as more perfect labor legisla-
tion. "We want a full life for every-
body, to touch all sides of life, a
wider and 'greater vision."
In quoting from a poem written by
an Englishman recently, she said,
"Our men died for a dream, the great-
est of all on earth. The task of re-
construction is to make this vision
real for which men have died. Our
duty is not to forget the suffering
and the war and all it means, but to
answer the riddle of the universe bet-
ter than any other civilization,' the
riddle which asks, 'are we going to
serve justice 'to the world?'"
9 BRITISH VESSELS OFFERED
TO TRANSPORT U. S. SOLDIERS
New York, Jan. 17.-Nine British
vessels with a total carrying capacity
of 27,750 men have been placed at the
disposal of the Ameican government
for the transportation of troops home,
it was announced here by the British
ministry of shipping. Sailing dates
from Brest were given as Jan. 16,
19, 22, 23, 26, 27, 31 and Feb. 1. In
addition the Olympic, Mauretania and
Aquitania, three of the largest Brit-

ish troops ships, will bring additional
American troops home in Februa'ry.
The Swedish American line an-
nounced today that their steamship
Stockholm will leave Gothenburg
about Jan. 18 and will call at Brest
to embark American troops for New
York.
CONGREGATION OF 29 REFUSES
$1,000,000 FOR ITS CEMETERY
Fort Worth, Tex., Jan. 17. - The
Merriman Baptist church, of Ranger,
which already has acquired an income
of $200,000 a year through oil wells
in its churchyard, has refused $1,000,-
000 for the right to develop wells in
the graveyard which adjoins the
church.
Numerous companies have made the
congregation, which has only 29
members, fabulous offers for the bury-
ing ground.

IOSHEYIM DESIRE
PEACE WITH ENTENTE
FRENCH GENERAL ASSUMES THE
XOMMAND OF ENTIRE
SIBERIAN FRONT
(By Associated Press)
Copenhagen, Jan. 17. - Maxim
Litvinoff, the former Bolshevik am-
bassador at London, has sent a note
to the President declaring that the
Bolshevik government of Russia is
prepared to cease its world propa-
ganda if the Allies will agree to en-
ter into peace negotiations with It,
according to the Social Demokratem.
Omsk, Jan. 16 (delayed) .-United
of command on the Siberian front
has been arranged and the French
General Jules Jannin, who has been
commander of the Czecho-Slovak
army, will be supreme commander of
the Allied forces in Russia. General
Knox, chief of the British military
mission, is occupied in the task of
electing a representative commission
to study and formulate a 'plan for the
election of a national assembly.
Workmen's co-operative organiza-
tions of Omsk and elsewhere have
proclaimed their support of the new
government. The government is ac-
tively negotiating with the powers
for recognition and also for partici-
pation in the peace conference.
REGULATION BY GOVERNMENT
OF COAL PRICES STOPS FEB. 1
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Jan. 17. - Zone and
price regulations on coke and all coal,
except Pennsylvania anthracite, were
suspended by the Fuel Administration
today, effective Feb. 1.
Suspension of the price regula-
tions includes provisions touching
purchasing agents' commissions and
wholesale and retail margins. No-
tice is given that the suspension is
subject to reinstatement if price,
labor, production or other condi-
tions that arise require.
SIX TRANSPORTS ON WAY
TO U. S. WITH MANY MEN
Washington, Jan. 17. - The trans-
port Melita, bringing 300 officers and
1,300 men from France will arrive at
Boston Jan. 21 and the transport Or-
izaba, with 100 officers and 2,600 men,
is due at New York Jan. 23. Other
transports now on the way from
France are: The Frances L. Skin-
ner, due at New York Jan. 30; the
Federal, due at Newport News Jan.
26; the Calamare, due at New York
Jan. 24, and the Monticello, due at
Newport News Jan. 27.
INDICATIONS OF BIG FEMALE
VOTE AT APRIL ELECTIONS
About 200 women have registered
for the spring primaries at the city
clerk's office to date. Should they con-
tinue as they have during the last few
days it i sthought that a large per-
centage of the city's fair sex will be
at the polls in April. Women may
register any time between now and
Feb. 15 with the city clerk and at the
polls at election time.
British Tighten Laws of Sinn Feiners
Dublin, Jan. 17.-The government,
it is reported here, is about to is-
si a proclamation tightening the
laws against the Sinn-Feiners. Once
a proclamation suppressing a Sinn-
Fein is issued it becomes a crime
to one belonging to the organization

and the government can send him to
jail.
The Sinn-Fein intend to summon
its own parliament and has already
held two preliminary meetings. The
members are looked upon as mem-
bers of the Irish Republic Assembly.
'94 Man, Research Authority, Dies
Mr. Samuel D. Magers, '94, profes-
sor of biology at the Northern State
Normal, Marquette, MichigEgn, died of
pneumonia on Jan. 16 at Marquette.
The burial will take place Jan. 18 in
Ypsilanti.
Mr. Magers is the brother-in-law of
Mrs. 0. B. Conart, of this city. He
formerly taught at Ypsilanti and was
pan authority on scientific research.
Yale Receives Gift of $15,000,400
Yale has received the third largest
bequest in the history of American
universities. It is for $15,000,000 giv-
en by John W. Sterling.

PEACE CENSORSHIP
NUISANCE--SCOTT
"Censorship is a necessary evil in
times of war," said Prof. Fred N. Scott
of the Rhetoric department, when ask-
ed for his ideas upon the subject of
censorship of the Peace Conference.
"Even then it should be in the hands
of experts in publicity. In times of
peace, however, such as we now en-
joy, all forms of censorship are sim-
ply a nuisance and should be abol-
ished," he added. "All news from the
other side has been so suppressed that
people on this side are growing rest-
less. As a democratic nation, they feel
that they ought to know exactly what
our government is doing in the Peace
Conference."
Professor Scott feels that the news-
papers can be trusted not to print
any unwise statements. He concludes,
"Experience has shown that the news-
papers, if put upon their honor, will
censor themselves effectively.
19191-Hop Date
Set For April 4
The J-Hop will be held Friday,
April 4. Waterman gymnasium, as
usual, will be the scene.
The Hop will equal in every way
the affairs of former years, even outdo
them if possible, according to the Hop
committee. The date was not decid-
ed upon without discussion, but it was
necessary that it be set' for some ime
during spring vacation, and it seemed
bette to fix it for the fist part, rath-
er than to attempt to bring students
back to school early.
That the committee means to go to
work in earnest was evidenced by the
plans for a better Hop than ever
brought up in the first meeting. That
old question of distribution of tickets
will be taken into account and han-
dled efficiently. While no permanent
committees were appointed provision
has been made to have every detail
thoroughly taken care of. The ques-
tion has been raised by a few as to
whether the Hop is to be formal. The
point was brought up in the meeting,
with the unanimous decision that it
would be.
The men working on the Hop are
as follows Karl Velde, chairman;
Perrin, Nash, Landis-Lits; Harbert,
Hogan, Tracy, Engineers; Ware,
Architect; Lazely, Homeopath; Vorys,
Dent; Struckman, law, and Halberig,
Pharmic. No Medic attended the
meeting, and it is not known whether
they have elected a man.
Th next meeting of the committee
will be held in the new Union build-
ing, at 7 o'clock Monday evening.
PROFESSOR BRIER
RESIGNS POSITION
Prof. J. C. Brier, of the chemical de-
partment, has sent in his resignatic
from the University. He will leave
in February to take a position with
the Howland Aniline company, at
Holland, Mich. He will act in an ex-
ecutive position, supervising the fac-
tory and laboratories. This company
specializes in sulphur dye stuffs.
Professor Brier has been connected
with the University for over a year
and a half, and his resignation will be
passed upon at the next meeting of
the Board of Regents.
BRUMM EXPOUNDS LIFE IDEALS
TO STUDENT MISSIONARIES
Prof. John R. Brumm address-

ed the missionary volunteer student
band last night in Lane hall. The
speaker told the society of the high
ideals which come into every man's
life, saying that when one receives
that call to the larger life, he should
answer it and thereby benefit the
whole world.
Professor Brumm praised the so-
ciety, which is a branch of the na-
tional organization headed by Mr.
John R. Mott. Its work is to furnish
voluntary student missionaries to any
part of the world where their work
may be needed.
County Treasurer Prepares Sale Book
The county. treasurer is now at
work on the tax sale book, an an-
nual catalogue of property to be put
on sale because of non-payment of tax-
es. The book contains information on
about 200 pieces of land which have
been taken over this year.

FOCH PACES NEWO
BOCHE BOUNDARY
ON HINE RIYERi
ALLIES PLAN NO RENEWAL OF
HOSTILITIES ON GERMAN
GOVERNMENT
.
SOLDIERS "SUPERB,"
SAYS GENERALISSIMO
Change of Frontier Protects Civiliza.
tion; Marshal Lauds Help of
America
(By Associated Press)
Paris, Jan. 15 (delayed).-It is the
conviction of Marshal Foch that the
Rhine is to be made the barrier be-
tween Germany and France. He ex-
pressed this clearly today when he
received an American newspaper cor-
respondent. The marshal is here in
connection with the meeting concern-
ing the extension of the German arm-
istice.
Marshal Foch pointed out the diffi-
culty that had been overcome and
said that peace must be commensurate
with the price of victory. Germany
now was beaten, but with resources
especially in men, recuperation in a
comparatively short time was quite
possible. It was no ti$e duty of the
Allies to prevent further aggressions.
Foch Praises U. S. Troops
Marshal Foch praises the work of
the American troops and said that
Generol Pershing had asked that the
American forces be concentrated for
an attack on one sector. The Allied
generalissimo admitted that the Ar-
gonne and Meuse front, where the
Americans began their offensive on
Sept. 26, was a "sector hard to tac-
kle." The marshal said he had told
General Pershing:
"Your men have the double dev-
ils' own punch. , They will get away
with all that. Go to it."
"The American attack succeeded,"
the marshal continued, "and here we
are on the Rhine."
Armistice Not Concluded Too Soon
The armistice was not concluded
too soon and the Allies got all'they
asked for from Germany without
continuing the fighting. The Allies,
the marshal said, were prepared for
another offensive which would have
forced the Germans to give up. This
was to have been made in Lorraine
on Nov. 14, with 6 American and .20
French divisions.
"This is, for me," Marshal Foch
said, "a happy opportunity to say
all of the good things I think of the
American army and of the part it
played on our side. Your soldiers
were superb. They came to us young,
enthusiastic and carried forward a
vigorous idealism and they marched
to battle with admiral gallantry.
Yankees Were "Superb"
"Yes, they were superb. There was
no other word. When they appear-
ed our armies were, as you know,
fatigued of three years of relentless
struggle, and the mantel of war- laid
heavily upon them.
"The youth of the United States
brought a renewal of the. hope that
hastened victory. Not only was this
moral effect of the highest importance,
but you also brought enormous mate-
rial aid and the wealth which you
placed at our disposal, contributed
to the final success. Nobody among
us will ever forget what America
did.''
Germans Gave Their All

Marshal Foch was asked by the cor-
respondent:
"But was not the armistice heed-
ed too soon?"
"It was not possible to do 'other-
wise," answered the marshal, "be-
cause the Germans gave them every-
thing that we asked for at once. They
satisfied our conditions. It was dif-
ficult to ask more. The Germans
were lost. They capitulated. There
is the whole story.
Guarantee Against Future Wars
"And now we must make a peace
which will correspond with the mag-
nitude of our victory. We must have
a peace as absolute as was our suc-
cess and which will guard us against
all future aggressions.
"France has a right to effective
measures of protection after the for-
midable efforts she put forth to save
civilization. The natural frontier
which will protect civilization is the
(Continued on Page Six)

SOPH LITS TO ORGANIZE
CLASS NEXT MONDAY

SURE

To elect a president and appoint a
committee which will'confer on the
soph prom with those committees al-
ready appointed by the sophomore,
class of the other colleges, a special
meeting of the soph lits has been call-
ed by Vice-president Alice E. Beck-
ham, for 4 o'clock Monday in Univer-
sity hall.
STERETEE CALLS MEETING
OF FRESHMAN LIT CLASS
President Frank Steketee has call-
ed a meeting of the fresh lits for 4
o'clock Tuesday in University hill.
Puans will be discussed for class as-
sessments and a committee to ar-
range a frosh frolic will be appoint-
ed. Dean John R. Effinger will ad-
dress the meeting
Classes in economic' at the Univer-
sity of Kansas are over-crowded this
year. An unusually large number of
women have enrolled in commercial

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