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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 17, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

STUDENTS MUST REGISTER
FOR SPRING PRIMARIES
MY VOTE BY ABSENT BALLOT
IF REGISTERED AT
HOME
Students attending the University
who are eligible to vote should reg-
ister with the city clerk of the town in
which they reside before Feb. 15.
Those who were qualified voters and
residents of Ann Arbor before the be-
ginning of the fall semester will be
qualified to vote at the coming elec-
tions. All, however, will be required
to register anew. A student does not
gain residence in Ann Arbor by at-
tendance at the University, but re-
tains residence in his former home
town.
Issue Absenit Voters Ballot j
Many states, Michigan for one, issue
what are known as absent voters' bal-
lots. If anyone is in doubt as to
whether or not his state is among this
number, he should communicate at
once with the city clerk of the town
in which he resides and arrange for
his ballot.
Registration will, continue in Ann
Arbor up to 8 o'clock of the evening
of Feb. 15. Registrants should appY
for registration at the office of the
city clerk. If any fail to register be-
fore the primaries and wish to vote
then, they may register at the polls
just previous to casting their ballot.
Good Until 1921
From March 6 to March 22, inclu-
sive, voters will be given another op-
portunity to register in order to vote

the very last day on whicl anyone
may register. Theymay then be reg- tied Galley
istered at the regular polling places.
Registration which is made at any Daily Offul
of the times above specified is good If the Bee were just jammed with
until 1922, unless the voter moves our nicest young people all more or
from one city ward to another, in less occupied guzzling goo-recuper-
which case he must re-register. ating after one of Ann Arbor's stren-
Beer and Wine Amendment Up uous social evenings-and you were
At the spring primaries the follow- there, sitting on one of those cute
ing state candidates will be nomin- three cornered little chairs, and you
ated: Two regents of the University, leaned back to look at some one and
one superintendent of public instruc- the chair slipped someway and you
tion, one member of the state board of lost your balance or something and
education, two state board of agricul- fell over backward and lay strug-
ture members, and one state highway gling on your dorsal surface while
commissioner. The filling of these of- everyone in the place arose and
fices is of, especial interest to Univer- laughe loudly-now wouldn't.that

sity students. The question of the so-
called beer and wine amendment to
the constitution of the state of Mich-
igan will also be voted upon.
ENROLLMENTS OUT
IN SIX COLLEGES!
Approximate enrollments announc-
ed Thursday for all but the College
of Literature, Science and the Arts,
are as follows: College of Dental Sur-
gery, 250; Medical School, 350; Col-
lege of Pharmacy, 35; Homeopathic
College, 29;, Law School, 70; College
of Engineering, 1000.
Conditions arising from the dis-
banding of the S. A. T. C. and naval.
unit have made it impossible to se-
cure even an approximate enroll-z
ment from the Literary College. The l
numbers given cannot be taken as a
real indication of this yeais enroll-I
ment, as it is probable that the rush
of returning students in February will
I in some cases double the present flg-

be an "offul?"

-.-I

Prineeton to Give Artillery Course
Princeton has accepted the offer of
the war debartment for a field artil-
lery unit. A course will also be given
involving the computation of firing
data and gunnery. A student who suc-
cessfully completes the course will
be commissioned as a second lieuten-
ant in the field artillery reserve corps.
Here's Story of
Howr Union Grew
The first committee meeting ever
held by the Michigan Union met in
December, 1903, in answer to a call
issued for representatives of all clubs
and associations, to consider ways and
means for the club which has finally
evolved into the present Union.
West hall was the scene of the first
meetings, only about a dozenrmen
being regularly present. As the club
progressed, new members were elect-
ed and the place of meeting was
changed to the Law building. The late
President James B. Angell was influ-
ential in starting the movement and
was desirous of its welffare. Other
faculty members who were interested
in the movement were Dean H. M.
Bates of the Law school, Prof. . M.
Wenley, and Prof. F. N. Scott. Its first
president was E. F. Parker, '06L, bet-
ter known on the campus as "Bob"
Parker. Other students connected with

Hymn of the Hater
Meet me on the hillside
Meet me in the dell
Meet me, meet me anywhere,
So's it's not in-Toledo.

the Union in its early days were Paul dinners, receptions, meetings of
Jones, '04L, of Youngstown, Ohio, and ganizations, committee meetings,
Emery Thomason, '04L, of Chicago. informal lectures. When the cony
On June 20, 1904, the Union was or- tion of the Association of Ameri
ganized and incorporated under the Universities was held here a few ye
state laws. From then on till 1906 ago the Union was used as its so
money was raised by entertainments, center.
circuses, county fairs, and member-I A million dollar campaign for ft
ship fees. In 1906 the old homestead with which to erect and maintain
of Judge Cooley son State street was club house came to a close in
bought and after a few alterations was spring of 1916. This campaign
used as the club house. Eleven hund- the most ambitious project ever un
red men were present at the first an- taken by the alumni of any coll
nual dinner given Nov. 11, 1904. That Directly after commencement in
dinner will long be remembered by summer of 1916 the old house was
those present for the enthusiasm and down and work was begun on the
loyalty to Michigan expressed there. building.
"~~n ian r " 'h Tnivtcfrs n

"Michigenda," the union'sfnrst opera;
produced in 1907, was written by Don-
ald Haines, '09, of Kalamazoo. Mr.r
Haines is also the author of this year's
book.
Through its eventful career the Un-
ion has been the scene of countless

Enrollment at Dartmouth fell
of expectations this year. Up to
only 90 men have registered and
these were entering freshmen.
Daily want Ads bring results.

1,-

at the April election. April 2 will be ures.
t._

- " """

Hadf an Hitch Honward
Rightfoot: "Let me move."
Left foot: "No, you just moved."
Tight skirt: "Compromise, and both
of you keep shuffling along."
Once there was a boy. He was very
industrious. He was told to save
everything, that nothing would be use-
less to him. He answered nothing,
but collected everything and stored
it away. He collected diamonds ,and
pieces of rubbish, and beautiful etch-
ings and daubs of mud, and old shoes
and ideas and countless other things
and put them in one cache, and val-
ued each equally, and always had a
great mass of material todraw upon,
but never could find any particular
thing.
He became a college professor.
There was another boy who receiv-
ed the same advice. He also said
nothing. And he collected diamonds,
and beautiful etchings and other
'things of real value, but did not both-
er with old shoes, daubs of mud and
the like. The valuable things he did
collect, he arranged in such fashion
that the could find any particular
needed thing when needed.
He, became a college professor.
D. T.H.
BEST & SAFEST. Money placed
with the Building and Savings Ass'n.
never paid less than 6 per cent. Money
loaned on real estate. H. H. Herbst,
Secretary, 14 Savings Bank Bldg.-
C Adv.

The best insurance is the insurance that yi
will be healthy and live long.
Why not tack on a few years by eating
the CAFETERIA where you can select for
adapted to your needs from ,a great varie
properly prepared from the best material.

s

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0

20% Discount

on Suits and Overcoats
Odd Trousers

We Cater

Especially to Student Trade

MENDING FREE

PHONE

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Main Street

State Street

No
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You will appreciate Blighty Service and Quality

ppV

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II

44

5

U________________________ I -

Leave Copy
at,'I
Quarry's aud
The Doe

CkASSI{FIED
ADVERTISING

Leave Cony
at
Students'
Supply Store

LOST
LOST-Dec. 20. At Michigan Cent;ral
depot, bill fold containing ticket to
New York and several bills. Return
to 705. Oakland. Telephone 1510-R.
Reward.
LOST-A pair of light tortoise shell
rimmed glasses in black case. Phone
2325.
FOUND

FOR RENT
FOR RENT-A desirable room in A.
A. Press building, suitable for- so-
iety, club or office. Steam heated
nand janitor service furnished. Will
rent at reasonable price. Box C.
FOR RE4NT - Front steam heated
rooms on State St. E. E. Calkins.

N

WANTED

I

i

WANTED- Singers: cortralto, bari-
'OUND - Fountain pen in Library. tone, tenor, for church quartet. Ap-
ply to Mrs. Grace Konold at the
'OUND-A way to advertise. Use it! University School of Music on Tues-
The Mihi-an nDaily. day or Thursday at 3:30 P. M.

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