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January 11, 1919 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-01-11

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.0

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

r urr r r . .. -

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER AT THE.
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
ublished every morning except Monday
ing the university year by the Board in
trol of Student Publications.
MBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
he Associated Press is exclusively entitled
the use for republication of all news dis-
ches credited to it or not otherwise credited
this paper and also the local news pub-
ed herein.
ntered at the postofiice at Ann Arbor,
higan, as aecoud class mattei..
ubscriptions by carrier or mail, $3.5o.
Iflices: Ann Arbor Press Building.
hones: Business, goo; Editorial, 2414.
ornmumncations not to exceed 300 words,
signed, the su igatu. not necessarily to ap-
.r iii print, but as an evidence 'of faith, and
ices of events will be published in The
ly at the discretion of the kEditor, if left
or mailed to the oil-ice.
insignedncommunications will receive no
sideration. No manuscript will be re-
ed unless the writer incloses postage.
be Daily does rct necessarily endorse the
inents expressed its the communications.
dred C. Mighell........Managing 1~ditor
old Makinson.........business Manager
ent 11. Riordan...........ews E ditor
aes R. Osius, Jr........City Eyditor
rguerite Clark .. ........Night Edicr
IeS C. J. Martin ....elegraph rdito
id B. Lantis............... Sport editor
tha Guernsey..........Women's Fditor
rk K. Ehlbert...........Associate Litor
len 1. Davis...........Literary Editor
;and A. Gaines..Advertising Manager
ans L. Abele........Publication Manager
ad A LMajore......Circulation Manager
n. .M. L Wevre........... Office Manager

en by the proposed method might
easily prove a factor inundermining
that democracy.
Any new idea should be granted
fair trial, particularly one adv.nced
with the highest of motives and pos-
sessing some apparent benefits, but
a knowledge of Michigan and of the
needs of her women prevents optim-
ism as to the succes o fthis one
A CHANCE FOR FAME
There are few people who haven't
read with wriggly joy humorous and
philosophic paragraphs and bits of
verse in the column of B. L. T. in the
Chicago Tribue, and of F. P. A. in the
New York Tribune. Those men draw
big salaries and are nationally known,
but only by their initials. Nearer
home we have C. C. B., C. T. S., and R.
F. H., with city or state reputations.
Ring Lardner, a Michigan student,
first got recognition by contributing
to some of those columns. The his-
tory of literature is full of men who
are known only by pen names. Rec-
ognition of one's mental personality
is constantly being obtained by those
who contribute to newspaper humor-
ous columns signing only their in-
itials or pen names.
All of which is merely introductory
to the general remark that The Mich-
igan Daily is running a column called
"A Pied Galley," and that the con-
ductor of this column intends to make
it compare favorably with the columns
mentoined in the opening paragraph.
The conductor makes that little re-
mark with due knowledge that it is
modest; he knows that he is a mighty
good judge of jeux d'esprit; he ap-
peals to faculty members to contribute
whimsicalities ofscience, philosophy,
literature or 'students' mistakes and
struggles; he appeals to students to
send in their jeune and sometimes je-
'une views of life; he appeals to the
world in general to communicate with
him concerning its little notions that
bring smiles of sophisticated appre-
ciation to the cultured reader--that is,
cui+ured according to University
lards. The interchange of some-
kindly, sometimes mordant, but
mellow reflections that this
hopes to run will be a real
l to its readers and contribut-
o. i distinctly worth while.

w

omen Receive
Thanks for Kits1.

~iom
A board meeting
eague will be held
horning in Barbour

en
of the Women's
at 9 o'clock this
gymnasium.

OFFICE. CDI
One of the p,

SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1919.
RT FOR 1919
r joys of an office is
IskC
.750

A grateful acknowledgment of the'
comfort bags'dispatched Dec. 29 to the
United States naval hospital, Brook-
lyn, N. Y., has been received by Flor-
ence Field, '20, chairman of the War
Work committee of the Women's
league.
The comfort bags, 144 in number,
contained everything to make a sol-
dier's Christmas happy, from a Gar-
goyle down to chewing gum. Writing
paper, candy, playing cards, peanuts,
pencils, books, cold cream, life savers,
and cigarettes, all were contained in
these kits. In addition to these art-
icles, each bag contained a form letter
sending Christmas wishes and expres-
sions of good will from the women of
Michigan to the sick and wounded
soldiers.
The letter from Capt. G. A. Lung,
commanding officer of the naval hos-
pital, showed appreciation of the,
thoughtfulness and attention that
prompted the sending of the kits. In
addition to the acknowledgment from
the commanding officer of the hospital,
personal letters of thanks have been
received from the 'patients themselves.,

h
m(r

Plans are under, way for an all-
campus mixer to be given by the Uni-
versity Girls' Glee club during Feb-
ruary.
Mr. Stevens to Address Unitarians
Mr. Stanley Stevens will address
the Unitarian Student society at 7
o'clock Sunday evening. The subject
of his talk is to be about the Detroit
Young People's society. The local
society as it was in former times will
be discussed by Miss Louise Georg
and Prof. Edson R. Sunderland. The
object of these talks is to formulate
some plan by which the scope activity
of the society may be enlarged.
All are cordially invited to attend
the lecture and to partake of the so-
cial hour to follow.
Lieut. Cholette Returns to University
Lieut. Paul E. Cholette, '20L, re-
turned to the University yesterday to
attend classes until the beginning of
the second semester when he will re-

A HandF
F

"Excelsior" any
Books, Carr
Suppi

' Diaries, Blank
Typewriter

Don't fail to visit our ne

TERSITY
t STORE

V

nch room.

Everything to1
Hot and Cold Dri

We make our own bake.

ods.

issue
A. Bernstein
e W. Porter
Dailey

LIITO RS
Paul G. Weber
Philip Ringer
E:. Dr Flintermann

REPORTERS
arsrct Christie' lerman Lustfield
ene Ellis Bowen Schurnacter
:ina Apel Henry O'Brien
aric Crozier Mary D. Lane
Renaud Sherwvood

sume his studies in the law school.
Yale LimIts 1st and 2nd Year Men Cholette received his commission in
Yale authorities have decided to the field artillery at Camp Taylor
eliminate all optional studies from early last month. He was publication
t e first and second year curricu- manager of The Daily last year.
lums. Hereafter a required program -
will be given to all freshmen and The Dailytat your door every morn-
sophomores. ing, $2.50 until June.-Adv.

TUTTLE'S LUNCH Rt

338 Maynard.

Across frot

e
de

I -

BUSIN ISS
ark B. Covell
iward Priuhs, Jr.
va .N. elshl
Gorge A. (Cadwell
,el F. Schoergerr

STAFF
Robert E. McKean
Clare W. Weir
Win. A. Leitzinger
D)onnell R.. Shoffner
11 enry Whiting 11

r

SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1919.
Issue Editor-Paul G. Weber
,{RESHMEN AND MARTHA COOK
Martha Cook building, one of tht
most beautiful of American college
buildings and probably the finest hall
of residence for women anywher, isa
to become a dormitory for upperclassi
women only, chosen on a basis of
scholarship and campus activity.
While the reasons for adopting this
radical policy are evident and sin-
cere, and certain benefits will accrue
from it, the announced purpose of the
donors of the building, "the greatest
gdod to the greatest number of col-
lege girls," will be ill-served It is
said that freshman girls who have
lived at Martha Cook have for the
most part joined sororities immedi-
,tely, that their social responsibility
and training has thus been doubled
while other girls went without, and
that the transientanature of these
underclass- girls has resulted in -a
hotel-dweller's attitude toward the
house and its other inmates. But the
entire elimination of freshman girls
is not the solution of this question.
A girl needs the dormitory more
during her first year than she ever
will .again. She needs the lessons of
restraint,regard for the comfort of
others, ideals of womanliness .and de-
mocracy which come from living ina
big, diversified, and closely regulated
community. She does not yet know
her Michigan, and the dorm is the
quickest and surest place to learn
the rudiments of it and to get her
balance.
But during the later years of col-
legt life she should have developed to
the point where freedom and self-ex-
pression are desirable, natural and
entirely safe. In other words, your
jutmior and senior girl should be a
woman, in every sense, not only ca
pable of taking care of herself and
directing her own life, but impelled
to' do so by her own unfolding idi-n
viduality. She has her foundation of
community responsibility; upon it she
should now have the opportunity to
build the structure of differentiated
personality. Dormitory life gives
ability to live with other people, but
complete development requires doing
and thinking by and for one's self.
The proposed system would reverse
the order of this growth, thrusting
freshman girls out to battle with the
unknown conditions of University life
and meet them as best they may;
confining mature girls by the ines-
capable bonds imposed by the'mere
fact of having more than a hundred
house-mates.
If the freshmen at Martha Cook
have joined sororities in such over-
whelming numbers, some system
should be devised to secure more rep-
resentative groups of girls as they.
come from the boarding and high
schools. That some of them after-
ward join sororities is not to be de-
plored; the mixture of sorority and
independent girls in the dormitories
hsbeen one of the strongest factors
in thegrowth of democracy among
Mlchigan women. The segregation

SHEEHAN & CO
FIX UP THE OLD ROOM
EYE SHADES MAKE WORK EASIER
PENNANTS AND WALL BANNERS MAKE YOUR ROOM INVITINC

THE "Y" INN AT LANE VALL
Students! Eat where you get the prope kind of
food. All Home Cooked Food

Lunch, 11:45-12:45
Dinner, 5:30-6:30
Lunch and Dinner,
Service Table d'Hote

. . .4
per week, $5.00

ants
mfts

Here's hoping you have a fine New Year. -Sheehan

Open to Men an j Women

i q

J

I

I

STUDY

STUDY

STUDY

'I
wor.
that
place,
rushed.

{e lots of soldiers in the
iow but it seems incredible
'e enough to police all the
hich "troops are being
rs have pledged them
i Roosevelt's policies.
lve retirement from
ibers of them.

I pen for Bur'noss
IALW ,
I WELO MAE

Be

Prepared

for.

B i

Opportunities

G. 0. . r
selves to
This wou'
public life

.r-T
ti

IF NOT

I

CAMPU

I

You are very apt to experience the sensation of being surpassed by a friend,
just because he knew
STENOGRAPHY

Hotel
IANN ARBOR'ST

LUNCH
**i*

An engint
that flight to
had been, We
it last Novemb
Sinn Feiners 1
stitution for Ire.
one, too.

-rofessor believes
's possible. If it
,ould have made

z

Preparedness!

Preparedn ess!

Preparedness!

Iished a con-
rermany has

NEW COMP(

TON

COURSE SC .VULED
Assistant Prof. Roy W. Cowden
will give a course in Junior compo-
sition the second semester which is not
scheduled in the University Announce-
ment. The course is intended to give
training in the writing and revision
of compositions.
The student will be expected to
submit five or six manuscripts dur-
ing the semester. These manuscripts
are to be carefully revised, the work
of revision continuing until the stu-
dent has made his composition as
nearly perfect as his talents permit.
The course should be elected as
Rhetoric 18. The class will meet
Tuesdays and Thursdays at 10 o'clock
in room 105, West hall. The course
will be open only to juniors who have
had Rhetoric 3 and 4 and is limited
to 20 students. All those wishing to
take this course should consult with
the instructor before making their
election.
BOARD OF EDUCATION PLANS
TO OFFER NEW VOTING PLACES
Plans were discussed at the meet-
ing of the board of education Wed-
nesday night for the probable use of
school buildings As voting precincts.
'Additional voting places are needed
due to the fact that the present pro-
cincts will have to be divided on ac-
count of the new women voters, which
will enlarge the number of voters in
each ward. If the plans are accept-
ed by the city council, school build-
ings may be used as polls in the sec-
ond, fifth, sixth, and seventh wards.
Oberlin Unit Cited for Bravery
Oberlin ambulance unit operating
on the Italian front has been cited for
their bravery inremoving wounded,
under the direct fire of the German

WAS THE SLOGAN OF-
GEO. B. CORTLEYOU, President of the Consolidated Gas Company of
New York City.
EDWARD BOK, Editor of The Ladies' Home Journal.
HUGH CHALMERS, Head of The Chalmers Motor Company, of De-
troit, Michigan.
MISS KATHERINE HARRISON, Called "The Oracle" by Wall
Street. Worth over a MILLION. Was Private Secretary to the
late H. H. Rogers, one of the Standard Oil Magnates.
MISS LILLIAN JONES, Head Cashier of the New York Branch of the
National Bank of Cuba. A few years ago she began as a Sten-
ographer at twelve dollars a week.
All of these unusually successful people made
their start by learning-
Stenography
BECAUSE

Cor.Huron St.
DETROIT UNT
Between Detra'
(C
(East,-- -
Detroit Limited
'm., and hourly to
Jackson Limited
a. m., and every 1
presses make local
Local Cars Eas :
every two hours to 9:05
To, Ypsilanti only, m11:45

Chicke
Sul

ING HOTEL
)inner
y

Fourth Ave.
D LINES
bot and Jackson
1)18)

- ro a.

apr. - .
1:48 p.
st of Ann
. -6:oo.a. :.,. a,.
P. i., 14:54 p. in.
P. In., 12 :20 a. II.,

0

T-
.E-
N-
0-
G-
R-
A-
H-

pells
rains
ncourages
ecessitates
riginates
uarantees you
enders a
ttains for you
repares for
elps you to
ields

T-
E-
N-
U-
-
R-
A-
H-
H-

uccess-
allen-
xcellenc-
egotiatio-
pportunities to out-d-
ood livin-
adiant successo-
new er-
osition at the to-
andle good Englis-
ou big mone-

s
E
N
R
A
P
H
Y

z :io a. M., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local cars West Bound- :48 a. mu., tc
12:2o a. m.
WAI KING LOO
Open from 11:30 a. m. to 12:00 p. m.
Phone 1620-R
814 S. State St. Ann Arbor
Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The bor Savial
porated 1st
Capit Surplus, $550,00'
Resoi ...$4,000'

YOU, SHOULD
Leave nothing undone towards making a success.
We teach the things that have made thousands of people successful.
We have been in the Business over 33 years.
We have turned out hundreds of very successful people.
Our method for Teaching SHORTHAND, TYPEWRITING and
BOOKKEEPING, etc., is the best and the most practical.

Nortl
Li

Uni*1
.ORRILLI

I

OUR JANUARY CLASSES
Tuesday, the 14th. Call and have a talk with us about it.

.ioewgrw41
Mimeograph.

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e

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